I V A A S K S

Documenting The Masses

— @IvaRad on Twitter.

It’s 6:38pm in Belgrade. How appropriate!, is my first thought. Once you’ve watched this new little film, it will be clearer why. The film was made this July in Cyprus, quickly, along the way, for a friend and with a friend…it incorporates the music of a magical instrument santouri, listen to a bit of its magic here. And of course,  WATCH THE FILM.

I’ve only a few days left in the Balkans before heading back to New York. On Thursday, I board the train to spend those last few days in Zagreb, Croatia. It’s the last stop and the place that contains a few remaining images needed for a new film that’s in the works… a postcard from the Balkans

Along the way Evaporating Borders screened at Sarajevo Film Festival and DokuFest in Prizren where it picked up the Award for Best Balkan Documentary. What a beautiful journey.

Yes, there have been a few films along the way, impactful, transformative ones. Göran Olsson's Concerning Violence is one such film. It is based on “The Wretched Of The Earth”, a book on Colonialism by psychiatrist and philosopher Frantz Fanon. Like in his last film, Black Power Mixedtape, Olsson takes old footage from the Swedish television archive to translate the text into film which is narrated by Lauryn Hill. The result is quite brilliant.

If you’re a MUBI fan, you may have caught Balint Kenyeres' Before Dawn, which is available on Youtube but a shame to watch this 35mm beauty of a film in a watered down, bad quality uploaded version. It’s a quiet gem, masterful. His other film A History Of Aviation is also up on vimeo.

At DokuFest, I got a chance to check out Linda Vastrik's Forest of The Dancing Spirits. The film was shot in the Congo on 16mm, in the remote depths of the rainforest. It’s truly a beautiful portrayal of the Yaka/Mbendjele community. In this portrayal the director doesn’t behind the camera to present this Other world to the viewer. She is present, a participator in the action, and delicately injects herself in a humorous and truthful manner. Not to mention the gorgeous cinematography.

And lastly, Marc Cousins and Mania Akbari's Life May Be is poetry, not so much visual but a genial exploration of thoughts, emotions and expression via an exchange of cinematic letters between the two directors, who had never met until after the film was finished. It was such pleasure to hear their insides.

More soon, two short films are in the works.

Until then, 

Enjoy.

<3

Sep 01
It&#8217;s 6:38pm in Belgrade. How appropriate!, is my first thought. Once you&#8217;ve watched this new little film, it will be clearer why. The film was made this July in Cyprus, quickly, along the way, for a friend and with a friend&#8230;it incorporates the music of a magical instrument santouri, listen to a bit of its magic here. And of course,  WATCH THE FILM.
I&#8217;ve only a few days left in the Balkans before heading back to New York. On Thursday, I board the train to spend those last few days in Zagreb, Croatia. It&#8217;s the last stop and the place that contains a few remaining images needed for a new film that&#8217;s in the works&#8230; a postcard from the Balkans&#8230;
Along the way Evaporating Borders screened at Sarajevo Film Festival and DokuFest in Prizren where it picked up the Award for Best Balkan Documentary. What a beautiful journey.
Yes, there have been a few films along the way, impactful, transformative ones. Göran Olsson's Concerning Violence is one such film. It is based on &#8220;The Wretched Of The Earth&#8221;, a book on Colonialism by psychiatrist and philosopher Frantz Fanon. Like in his last film, Black Power Mixedtape, Olsson takes old footage from the Swedish television archive to translate the text into film which is narrated by Lauryn Hill. The result is quite brilliant.
If you&#8217;re a MUBI fan, you may have caught Balint Kenyeres' Before Dawn, which is available on Youtube but a shame to watch this 35mm beauty of a film in a watered down, bad quality uploaded version. It&#8217;s a quiet gem, masterful. His other film A History Of Aviation is also up on vimeo.
At DokuFest, I got a chance to check out Linda Vastrik's Forest of The Dancing Spirits. The film was shot in the Congo on 16mm, in the remote depths of the rainforest. It&#8217;s truly a beautiful portrayal of the Yaka/Mbendjele community. In this portrayal the director doesn&#8217;t behind the camera to present this Other world to the viewer. She is present, a participator in the action, and delicately injects herself in a humorous and truthful manner. Not to mention the gorgeous cinematography.
And lastly, Marc Cousins and Mania Akbari's Life May Be is poetry, not so much visual but a genial exploration of thoughts, emotions and expression via an exchange of cinematic letters between the two directors, who had never met until after the film was finished. It was such pleasure to hear their insides.
More soon, two short films are in the works.
Until then, 
Enjoy.
&lt;3

Yes, it’s been a while since my last post…But a lot has also happened.

It’s been an incredibly busy year, busy with post-production and finishing of my first feature-length film, which is now finally complete and touring the festivals. I’ll quickly summarize the happenings since the film’s completion to make up for the lost time and lack of updates. Hopefully, this is somewhat entertaining. 

Evaporating Borders was completed in January and premiered at International Film Festival Rotterdam to an eager audience!

The film was part of the State of Europe section at the festival along with films like Gianfranco Rossi’s brilliant Sacro Gra and Kaveh Bakhtiari’L’escale. Other gems at the festival included Ilya Khrzhanovsky's 4, Ben Russell and Ben River’s Spell to Ward Off the Darkness (premiering at ND/NF), Ester Martin Bergsmark’s Something Must Break which won the Tiger, Roberto Minervini’s Stop The Pounding Heart (ND/NF), Riad Sattouf’s Jacky Au Royaume des Filles and Vimukthi Jayasundara's The Forsaken Land.

The programming at IFFR is daring and creative… each film had it’s own unique voice and approach and I found the festival as a whole incredibly inspiring.

I joined filmmakers Xiaolu Guo and Thomas Bellinck, as well as Rutger Wolfson on a panel to talk about the State of Europe, spoke to FRED Film Radio on a podcast about the film and came home to NY to find a lovely review of Evaporating Borders by The Hollywood Reporter in which Clarence Tsui calls the film “Thoughtful and lyrical…Radivojevic’s film is a valiant call for a new way of thinking”.

In Rotterdam, we found out the film would have a US premiere at SXSW Film Festival. The film premiered to a full house and received rave reviews.

Film Threat wrote, possibly the best review one could have hoped for, humbling… “Aesthetically, I’ve never seen such magnificent cinematography in a documentary…Equally impressive is Radivojevic’s skill in driving her message home…Evaporating Borders is a must-see movie and its filmmaker is a highly sensitive rarity, with the great ability to open our eyes and change the world.

Nonfics listed Evaporating Borders as one of the Top 5 documentaries at 2014 SXSW Film Festival. Hammer To Nail’s Mike S. Ryan and Jesse Klein selected it as their “Best of SXSW” picks. 

Austin Chronicle described the film as “poetic, stream-of-consciousness narration enhances the beautiful visual essay; its structure – five chapters – serves to efficiently organize a complicated story of shifting borders and cultural paradigms and Cineuropa wrote “through its five chapters full of gentle, honest and simple images, Radivojevic’s story manages to transcend the most thoughtful, and even the most lyrical, aspect of a subject that does not usually have room to accommodate delicacy of any kind.”

The next festival that followed was Thessaloniki Documentary Film Festival. Other films in the program included Michael Obert’s beautiful Song From The Forest and Talal Derki’s Return to Homs, a powerful film.

The audiences in Thessaloniki asked brilliant questions and engaged with the film in the most interesting and intimate way. The kind of discussion that feels organic and productive and enriching. Analytical. A beautiful experience.

From Thessaloniki, the film went to Human Rights Watch London. The conversation there was just as engaging. The best part is that the people relate the story to their own surrounding, their own country and environment. They engage with it on a personal level. At least those who are vocal about it ::: Little Frances’ post summarizes it here.

While there BBC World News Invited us for a chat which was to air live.

A few interviews took place in between, Reelscreen, IndieWire, Filmmaker Mag’s Women of SXSW, Sarah Salovaara’s 5 Questions.

I’m writing all this from Cyprus, where I spent a good portion of the past couple of years making the film. Next week the film will screen at Cyprus Film Days to a local audience. It will be emotional and conflicting and probably intense. We’re looking forward to the discussions.

From there we head to Sarasota FF and HotDocs and luckily the list continues. 

All this to say, that I’m quite overwhelmed and incredibly grateful that the film has found a path and is being well received. It’s been quite special and I couldn’t ask for more. Policies are rarely changed because of documentary films, though I hope it will prove transformative for some.

The life of the film is still in its early stages, but i’m already itching to make, create and work on new projects.

An ivaasks short is long over due and coming soon.

With love.

Enjoy.

Mar 29

Made it! EVAPORATING BORDERS premieres tomorrow, Jan 23rd at 7pm @ IFFR ::: <3 (at Rotterdam)

Jan 22
Made it! EVAPORATING BORDERS premieres tomorrow, Jan 23rd at 7pm @ IFFR ::: &lt;3 (at Rotterdam)

I’m extremely honored, excited and humbled to be included in this year’s list of 25 New Faces of Independent Film by Filmmaker Magazine, along with 24 other talents. The list profiles a selected range of up and coming film talent and work to keep a look out for. A huge thank you to everyone at Filmmaker for this support.

My feature film “Evaporating Borders”, profiled here will also be participating at the IFP Film Week as a part of Spotlight on Documentaries in September. Check out the full list here

Exciting times.

Jul 27
I&#8217;m extremely honored, excited and humbled to be included in this year&#8217;s list of 25 New Faces of Independent Film by Filmmaker Magazine, along with 24 other talents. The list profiles a selected range of up and coming film talent and work to keep a look out for. A huge thank you to everyone at Filmmaker for this support.
My feature film &#8220;Evaporating Borders&#8221;, profiled here will also be participating at the IFP Film Week as a part of Spotlight on Documentaries in September. Check out the full list here. 
Exciting times.

WATCH ::: Between Colors Of I 

Just before diving into the the abyss of post production on Evaporating Borders, I sidetracked a little bit and composed this short hybrid short, loosely based on the recent trip through Morocco.

It attempts to borrow from the Proustian narrator, somewhat elusive, somewhat unknown, fluctuating - he exists in an unknown time period in an undefined space. The voiceover is narrated by a talented musician and a new good friend I encountered on the way Yasser Belaiachi.

Otherwise, this week my short Ben : In The Mind’s Eye screens at the Brooklyn Film Festival - it shares the screen with 5 other intense films, a really strong program. Today is the last day to check it out!

I would skip Harmony Korine’s Spring Breakers and watch or re-watch the brilliant Mystery Train by Jim Jarmusch instead… not that they are connected in anyway, the later is just a beautiful gem I discovered recently.

I’m switching off for a bit and embracing the beast (of a film).

Enjoy everything.

Jun 07
WATCH ::: Between Colors Of I 
Just before diving into the the abyss of post production on Evaporating Borders, I sidetracked a little bit and composed this short hybrid short, loosely based on the recent trip through Morocco.
It attempts to borrow from the Proustian narrator, somewhat elusive, somewhat unknown, fluctuating - he exists in an unknown time period in an undefined space. The voiceover is narrated by a talented musician and a new good friend I encountered on the way Yasser Belaiachi.
Otherwise, this week my short Ben&#160;: In The Mind&#8217;s Eye screens at the Brooklyn Film Festival - it shares the screen with 5 other intense films, a really strong program. Today is the last day to check it out!
I would skip Harmony Korine&#8217;s Spring Breakers and watch or re-watch the brilliant Mystery Train by Jim Jarmusch instead&#8230; not that they are connected in anyway, the later is just a beautiful gem I discovered recently.
I&#8217;m switching off for a bit and embracing the beast (of a film).
Enjoy everything.

WATCH, Evaporating Borders Excerpt ::: https://vimeo.com/65610353

It’s an exciting time. My whole summer is dedicated to the post production of my first feature length documentary and definitely the most ambitious of all my work thus far.

It has been an interesting journey and it continues to be.

Over the years I’ve developed quite an obsession with the Essay Film in the vane of Chris Marker, Agnes Varda, Alain Resnais, Allan Sekula, Harun Farocki. The process allows for exploration and search, it’s an investigation that doesn’t necessarily resolve. And it happens to be the most effective way I can express myself in film. I’m exciting about exploring and pushing those possibilites with this Evaporating Borders.

I was intrigued by some of the thoughts in Timothy Corrigan's book  ”The Essay Film : From Montaigne, After Marker” (enjoy this excerpt).

Two films that I found inspiring recently, both over 30 years old are Alain ResnaisHiroshima Mon Amour" and Sergej Paradjanov's “Color of Pomegranates”. Very different films, but both adventurous, daring, explorative, visually compelling and reflective. Reflecting on memory, tradition, culture and identity.

Enjoy.

Jun 05
WATCH, Evaporating Borders Excerpt ::: https://vimeo.com/65610353
It&#8217;s an exciting time. My whole summer is dedicated to the post production of my first feature length documentary and definitely the most ambitious of all my work thus far.
It has been an interesting journey and it continues to be.
Over the years I&#8217;ve developed quite an obsession with the Essay Film in the vane of Chris Marker, Agnes Varda, Alain Resnais, Allan Sekula, Harun Farocki. The process allows for exploration and search, it&#8217;s an investigation that doesn&#8217;t necessarily resolve. And it happens to be the most effective way I can express myself in film. I&#8217;m exciting about exploring and pushing those possibilites with this Evaporating Borders.
I was intrigued by some of the thoughts in Timothy Corrigan's book  &#8221;The Essay Film&#160;: From Montaigne, After Marker&#8221; (enjoy this excerpt).
Two films that I found inspiring recently, both over 30 years old are Alain Resnais &#8220;Hiroshima Mon Amour" and Sergej Paradjanov's &#8220;Color of Pomegranates&#8221;. Very different films, but both adventurous, daring, explorative, visually compelling and reflective. Reflecting on memory, tradition, culture and identity.
Enjoy.

image

WATCH Our ::: New Times Op - Doc

There’s been quite a lot going on, a busy time and so a while since my last post. In February we wrapped production on our upcoming feature documentary Evaporating Borders, and launched its beautiful website

In the meantime, the New York Times commissioned a short piece based on the material from the film and published my Op-Doc in April. With the controversial subject matter and the extreme economic issues in Cyprus, the short produced an exciting and heated conversations on Facebook and other social media outlets. As hoped for!

While the journalistic approach is not my preferred style of communication, in which a complex story is squeezed in a condensed format, the platform does act as an incredible tool to relay the message and talk about issues that are otherwise tossed aside.

And talking about issues that are tossed aside, a must see film is The Act Of Killing by Joshua Oppenheimer, catch it at the Human Rights Film Festival in New York in June. Joshua’s introduces a new way of documenting, a new way of communicating both in contact with people and through film. The film enters the minds of the perpetrators, makes us like them, draws us into an insane world of bizarre layered multiple realities, imagination and appearances…it’s as much about the Indonesian genocide as it is about ourselves and the art of filmmaking and telling stories. Simply brilliant.

And on the fiction side, Noah Baumbach’s new film Frances Ha is a hilarious adventure, beautifully co-written by the director and Greta Gerwig, my new favorite actress. Loved this film, which my be even more fun and closer to heart for us New Yorkers.

Catch it at IFC!

x

May 20

WATCH ::: https://vimeo.com/58313887

While working on my new film, a long form documentary that addresses displacement, tolerance, refugees and people migration and mainly takes place in Cyprus…I took a little trip to Israel and Palestine. Most asylum seekers in Cyprus are Palestinian, some have never even been to Palestine.
I was curious to find out more about the land… conscious of the privilege I have to explore my curiosity, 
while they will never be allowed to come near their homeland.

During my brief visit to Palestine, I met Avram, also known as John…He chatted for a few hours. Here are his thoughts.

Over the winter holidays, I also took a short detour to Morocco…an intense and beautiful country also polluted by the remnants of colonialism. More visuals and thoughts from there in the next post.

On a filmic note, Sundance just wrapped and published a list of winning films, perhaps some to look out for.

In the meantime, I finally saw  Women On A Verge Of a Nervous Breakdown, Pedro Almodovar's brilliant imagination at its best. Besides the super intelligent narrative dramaturgy, there are various levels of cinematic gems, from colors, compositions, camera movement to symbolic use of objects and devices. Delight!

And one more delightful gem is Tsai Ming-liang’s short film Walker  that won at Cannes last year, you can watch it in its entirety online. Patience is the word. We’re working to break and challenge the 30 second attention span.

If you’re looking for more stimulation, IDFA has a list of short films available for online watching, all of which took part at the festival.

 

Enjoy.

 

 

 

 

Jan 27
WATCH ::: https://vimeo.com/58313887

While working on my new film, a long form documentary that addresses displacement, tolerance, refugees and people migration and mainly takes place in Cyprus&#8230;I took a little trip to Israel and Palestine. Most asylum seekers in Cyprus are Palestinian, some have never even been to Palestine.I was curious to find out more about the land&#8230; conscious of the privilege I have to explore my curiosity, while they will never be allowed to come near their homeland.
During my brief visit to Palestine, I met Avram, also known as John&#8230;He chatted for a few hours. Here are his thoughts.

Over the winter holidays, I also took a short detour to Morocco&#8230;an intense and beautiful country also polluted by the remnants of colonialism. More visuals and thoughts from there in the next post.

On a filmic note, Sundance just wrapped and published a list of winning films, perhaps some to look out for.
In the meantime, I finally saw  Women On A Verge Of a Nervous Breakdown, Pedro Almodovar's brilliant imagination at its best. Besides the super intelligent narrative dramaturgy, there are various levels of cinematic gems, from colors, compositions, camera movement to symbolic use of objects and devices. Delight!
And one more delightful gem is Tsai Ming-liang&#8217;s short film Walker  that won at Cannes last year, you can watch it in its entirety online. Patience is the word. We&#8217;re working to break and challenge the 30 second attention span.
If you&#8217;re looking for more stimulation, IDFA has a list of short films available for online watching, all of which took part at the festival.
 
Enjoy.
 
 
 
  

WATCH IT HERE : https://vimeo.com/53804072

In April I took a little trip down the Mexico. I purposely left the camera at home and brought only a sound recorder and the sick addictive device that is the iphone. The idea was to not spend the entire trip behind the camera lens but to discover what could be created as an alternative…So, I resorted to my other (neglected) loves, illustration, photography and animation. It”s what a day in a small Mexican town felt like.

Last night Union Docs hosted a beautiful screening of shorts by the Brooklyn Filmmakers Collective, it included my short Gawking Red.

I’ve been deeply impressed by two films recently, one fiction and documentary.

Leo Carax's Holy Motors is a must see, a very Brechtian approach to filmmaking. The viewer is never relaxed into a passive indulgence, but is continuously interrupted by new possibilities. The film is densely layered; it addressed our voyeuristic society, our need for sensationalism, how and why we are entertained. It very much comments on acting, roles and audience.


At the same time watching it, the viewer is trying to decipher between multiple realities, that on film and their own. What is real and for who?

What is beautiful and who decides it is so? It also brings to mind the idea of hybrid identities and as Audre Lorde would say, the possibility of being and assuming multiple identities at the same time.


At the other end…

In his 10 advice tips for aspiring filmmakers, the brilliant Russian documentary filmmaker Viktor Kossakovsky says “Don’t film if you want to say something – just say it or write it. Film only if you want to show something, or you want people to see something. This concerns both the film as a whole and every single shot within the film.” Michael Glawogger's Workingman’s Death is a perfect example.  The film covers volumes with its succinct simplicity. Just brilliant.


Enjoy.

Nov 19
WATCH IT HERE : https://vimeo.com/53804072
In April I took a little trip down the Mexico. I purposely left the camera at home and brought only a sound recorder and the sick addictive device that is the iphone. The idea was to not spend the entire trip behind the camera lens but to discover what could be created as an alternative&#8230;So, I resorted to my other (neglected) loves, illustration, photography and animation. It&#8221;s what a day in a small Mexican town felt like.
Last night Union Docs hosted a beautiful screening of shorts by the Brooklyn Filmmakers Collective, it included my short Gawking Red.
I&#8217;ve been deeply impressed by two films recently, one fiction and documentary.
Leo Carax's Holy Motors is a must see, a very Brechtian approach to filmmaking. The viewer is never relaxed into a passive indulgence, but is continuously interrupted by new possibilities. The film is densely layered; it addressed our voyeuristic society, our need for sensationalism, how and why we are entertained. It very much comments on acting, roles and audience.

At the same time watching it, the viewer is trying to decipher between multiple realities, that on film and their own. What is real and for who?
What is beautiful and who decides it is so? It also brings to mind the idea of hybrid identities and as Audre Lorde would say, the possibility of being and assuming multiple identities at the same time.

At the other end&#8230;
In his 10 advice tips for aspiring filmmakers, the brilliant Russian documentary filmmaker Viktor Kossakovsky says &#8220;Don’t film if you want to say something – just say it or write it. Film only if you want to show something, or you want people to see something. This concerns both the film as a whole and every single shot within the film.&#8221; Michael Glawogger's Workingman&#8217;s Death is a perfect example.  The film covers volumes with its succinct simplicity. Just brilliant.

Enjoy.

WATCH HERE ::: http://vimeo.com/50014012

This August, 

I ventured off to Pozega, a beautiful small town in Serbia where summer nights are cold and people are warm. While there for a 10 day film workshop InterDOC, we stayed at Hotel Pozega. Each meal was heavy but brilliantly flavored by Milena’s colorful presence. We caught her just before she took off on her Greek vacation. My partners in crime here and new fantastic friends Isabella Rinaldi and Ana Lucia Ordonez lend their skillful hands. Otherwise the workshop with Zelimir Zilnik and Dragan Elcic were brilliantly insightful.

Otherwise, most of my time was spent in Cyprus and working on my feature-length documentary, working title : Five Star Country. The blog updates are not as frequent because of it but will be done monthly while I orchestrate this beast of a project. In the meantime, some inspiring films…oldies, yes…

Andrei Tarkovsky’s The Mirror is a beautiful abstraction of past and present, reflecting on time, memory, spaces between reality.

It’s also cinematic ecstasy.

On the same principle, of time, space, memory, life and death is Gaspar Noe’s Enter The Void.

This one kind of disturbs you from the inside. But ultimately, the creativity inspires and you remember why you love making films. 

More for September coming soon.

Enjoy.

Aug 20
WATCH HERE ::: http://vimeo.com/50014012
This August, 
I ventured off to Pozega, a beautiful small town in Serbia where summer nights are cold and people are warm. While there for a 10 day film workshop InterDOC, we stayed at Hotel Pozega. Each meal was heavy but brilliantly flavored by Milena&#8217;s colorful presence. We caught her just before she took off on her Greek vacation. My partners in crime here and new fantastic friends Isabella Rinaldi and Ana Lucia Ordonez lend their skillful hands. Otherwise the workshop with Zelimir Zilnik and Dragan Elcic were brilliantly insightful.
Otherwise, most of my time was spent in Cyprus and working on my feature-length documentary, working title&#160;: Five Star Country. The blog updates are not as frequent because of it but will be done monthly while I orchestrate this beast of a project. In the meantime, some inspiring films&#8230;oldies, yes&#8230;
Andrei Tarkovsky&#8217;s The Mirror is a beautiful abstraction of past and present, reflecting on time, memory, spaces between reality.
It&#8217;s also cinematic ecstasy.
On the same principle, of time, space, memory, life and death is Gaspar Noe&#8217;s Enter The Void.
This one kind of disturbs you from the inside. But ultimately, the creativity inspires and you remember why you love making films. 
More for September coming soon.
Enjoy.

Across the seas ::: http://vimeo.com/45797403

I’m dwelling in Mediterranean waters over the summer and working on my first full length documentary
that addresses the lives of political refugees and asylum seekers on the island of Cyprus. Specifically, it addresses tolerance, migration trends, nation-states/nation-building, changing global dynamics and collapse of Eurocentrism through the lens of current migration trends in Cyprus. It has been an interesting journey and a surreal one.

In between incomprehensible refugee stories of exile and plight I return to my life and consider my own reality.
It’s a difficult adjustment. But more than anything else, it reminds me to appreciate it all.
Here on a full moon night, we enjoy Xartini’s song…and appreciate the night.

On a filmic note :::
Here’s a brilliant film by Aris Chatzistefanou and Katerina Kitidi that analyzes the crisis in Greece and elsewhere, political agendas and effects of privatization - it features Naomi Klein, Zizek and others. It’s brilliantly executed and free online ::: CATASTROIKA.

And another brilliant project from Greece, a web doc series that dig into all cultural, socio-economic aspects of the country ::: 
THE PRISM
.

Enjoy.

Jul 16
Across the seas ::: http://vimeo.com/45797403
I&#8217;m dwelling in Mediterranean waters over the summer and working on my first full length documentarythat addresses the lives of political refugees and asylum seekers on the island of Cyprus. Specifically, it addresses tolerance, migration trends, nation-states/nation-building, changing global dynamics and collapse of Eurocentrism through the lens of current migration trends in Cyprus. It has been an interesting journey and a surreal one.
In between incomprehensible refugee stories of exile and plight I return to my life and consider my own reality.It&#8217;s a difficult adjustment. But more than anything else, it reminds me to appreciate it all.Here on a full moon night, we enjoy Xartini&#8217;s song&#8230;and appreciate the night.
On a filmic note :::Here&#8217;s a brilliant film by Aris Chatzistefanou and Katerina Kitidi that analyzes the crisis in Greece and elsewhere, political agendas and effects of privatization - it features Naomi Klein, Zizek and others. It&#8217;s brilliantly executed and free online ::: CATASTROIKA.
And another brilliant project from Greece, a web doc series that dig into all cultural, socio-economic aspects of the country ::: THE PRISM.
Enjoy.

June’s Steel Drum Orchestras ::: http://vimeo.com/45010190

This is very quick and dirty.
Last summer my partner in crime Sarah Hagey and I made a short film on Despers USA,
a full steel drum orchestra from Trinidad. Throughout the summer, various bands gather
throughout brooklyn to practice and prepare for the annual competition in September.
Last year’s winners were Adlib, this is a small excerpt of their performance that Sarah and I
had a pleasure of checking out. The Despers put on a night that featured the best of the best
and asked us to film the event. We haven’t yet had a chance to edit the entire thing.
But here’s a little taste, I was elevated by Adlib and perhaps you will be too.

Our short film, Despers USA is screening at Rooftop films on June 29th, and the
Despers are performing!

Be sure to check it out - they transport you into a trance!

Otherwise, I’m currently in Cyprus working on my first feature films and so the posts are less
frequent but are nevertheless coming…I will be posting some interesting stuff over the summer.


In the meantime,
One of my new all time favorite films 5 Broken Cameras.
Absolutely ingenius, done jointly by a Palestinian and an Israeli director.
It’s conveys the problems as you have never seen it before, cleverly and emotionally structured.
Brilliant editing too.

Find it!

Jun 18
June&#8217;s Steel Drum Orchestras ::: http://vimeo.com/45010190
This is very quick and dirty.Last summer my partner in crime Sarah Hagey and I made a short film on Despers USA,a full steel drum orchestra from Trinidad. Throughout the summer, various bands gatherthroughout brooklyn to practice and prepare for the annual competition in September.Last year&#8217;s winners were Adlib, this is a small excerpt of their performance that Sarah and Ihad a pleasure of checking out. The Despers put on a night that featured the best of the bestand asked us to film the event. We haven&#8217;t yet had a chance to edit the entire thing.But here&#8217;s a little taste, I was elevated by Adlib and perhaps you will be too.
Our short film, Despers USA is screening at Rooftop films on June 29th, and theDespers are performing!
Be sure to check it out - they transport you into a trance!
Otherwise, I&#8217;m currently in Cyprus working on my first feature films and so the posts are lessfrequent but are nevertheless coming&#8230;I will be posting some interesting stuff over the summer.
In the meantime,One of my new all time favorite films 5 Broken Cameras.Absolutely ingenius, done jointly by a Palestinian and an Israeli director.It&#8217;s conveys the problems as you have never seen it before, cleverly and emotionally structured.Brilliant editing too.
Find it!

It’s been a super busy year so far. Since last year I’ve been working with Benjamin Moylen on a short film that addresses schizophrenia. It’s not finally complete, in its 13 minutes of length. Here is a very small excerpt from a the film. Ben is a character portrait of a person living with schizophrenia. The film addresses behaviors and challenges associated with the condition and illustrates how it is channelled into an artistic process.


I was lucky to have lots of advice and assistance on the film namely from the Brooklyn Filmmakers Collective, my comrades from Hunter’s IMA MFA Program and the brilliant Laura Poitras.

You might enjoy the teaser ::: http://vimeo.com/45010218

On a filmic note :::
Yes, I’m late with this one…but…Michael Haneke's Cache is a must see, (he also just won Palme d’Or at Cannes for his new film Amour)
Brilliantly constructed, it investigates social infrastructures as a direct result of of French colonial practices and
how these translate into the modernity as social tensions, immigration intolerance, phobia of the outsider and pseudo liberalism…
all this through a window of a guilty conscious of the protagonist.

Here’s an interesting interview with the director.
An insightful quote from it :::
In all of my films, I try to fuel mistrust in our faith in reality. We know nothing about the world, except the things we have experienced directly. And we can examine these things. But everything else we experience through the media. And this functions like Chinese whispers, a piece of information is related from one person to the next. You only have to look at what Bush does with that. I see it as my aesthetic duty to reflect this. It’s no coincidence that post-War literature signalled the end of classical narrative literature. It came from the experience of fascism, and the same applies to film.

Enjoy.

May 14
It&#8217;s been a super busy year so far. Since last year I&#8217;ve been working with Benjamin Moylen on a short film that addresses schizophrenia. It&#8217;s not finally complete, in its 13 minutes of length. Here is a very small excerpt from a the film. Ben is a character portrait of a person living with schizophrenia. The film addresses behaviors and challenges associated with the condition and illustrates how it is channelled into an artistic process.
I was lucky to have lots of advice and assistance on the film namely from the Brooklyn Filmmakers Collective, my comrades from Hunter&#8217;s IMA MFA Program and the brilliant Laura Poitras.
You might enjoy the teaser ::: http://vimeo.com/45010218
On a filmic note :::Yes, I&#8217;m late with this one&#8230;but&#8230;Michael Haneke's Cache is a must see, (he also just won Palme d’Or at Cannes for his new film Amour)Brilliantly constructed, it investigates social infrastructures as a direct result of of French colonial practices andhow these translate into the modernity as social tensions, immigration intolerance, phobia of the outsider and pseudo liberalism&#8230;all this through a window of a guilty conscious of the protagonist.
Here&#8217;s an interesting interview with the director.An insightful quote from it :::&#8221;In all of my films, I try to fuel mistrust in our faith in reality. We know nothing about the world, except the things we have experienced directly. And we can examine these things. But everything else we experience through the media. And this functions like Chinese whispers, a piece of information is related from one person to the next. You only have to look at what Bush does with that. I see it as my aesthetic duty to reflect this. It&#8217;s no coincidence that post-War literature signalled the end of classical narrative literature. It came from the experience of fascism, and the same applies to film.&#8221;
Enjoy.

Over Christmas ::: http://vimeo.com/39613317

I took a little road trip to Vermont, to my friend Tennessee Watson and her father Bill.
Their beautiful house on the creek, a “hotbed for radical feminism” was once owned by Aunt Lou,
a jailbird Suffragette, who fought for women’s right to vote in Vermont. Here’s her-story.

I’ve been quite busy developing my next project, feature documentary which I am shooting this summer in Cyprus…loosely based on an interview i did with Simon Khan. In thinking about the structure of the film, I’m exploring non traditional documentary forms, others ways of expressing and telling a story and so I have been researching such works.

I picked out a few highlights from experimental filmmaker Trinh T. Minh-ha’s book Woman, Native, Other - to stay on the topic of feminism. Her writing is abstract, involved and provoking, as are her films, here are some of her thoughts :

"In this unwonted spectacle made of reality and fiction, where redoubled images form and reform, neither I nor you come first. No primary core of irradiation can be caught hold of, no hierarchical first, second, or third exists except as mere illusion. All is empty when one is plural. Yet how difficult is it to keep our mirrors clean…Theory oppresses, when it wills or perpetuates existing power relations, when it presents itself as a means to exert authority - the Voice of Knowledge…And theory as a tool of survival needs to be rethought in relation to gender in discursive practice… He who represents his own discourse on myths as a myth is acutely aware of the illusion of all reference to a subject as absolute center. The packaging of myths must somehow bear the form of that which it attempts to enclose, if it wishes to come closest to its subject. One cannot seize without smothering,for the will to freeze (capture) brings about a frozen (emptied) object.”

I also recently read an interesting interview with Armenian filmmaker Artavazd Peleshian in which he talks about his “distance montage” method which “creates a magnetic field around the film…it allows you to defeat time…when you reach the end, you’re also back at the beginning…And the effect is that the film revolves; it is “revolution” in a new sense…Orbits are created. Sound and image cross each other, intersect each other, switch, change territories. The sound enters the territory of the picture and the image enters the territory of the sound. You start to see the sound, and you hear the picture”.

He closes his the interview with a thought that deeply resonates with me personally when talking about film and ones work:
"I’ve tried to simplify things to get ideas across. But my films are precisely not about language, about verbal communications. The difficulty is that one cannot express with words what one finds in my films. If it were possible to say it with words, the films would be useless. Words cannot express it. One should not talk about films, one should watch them. This is why I have always been against interviews."

In terms of films to watch, I also checked out a screening of Yugoslavian Experimental Films this past week at Anthology Archives.

Two that stuck out the most are Zelimir Zilnik’s Inventory and Ivica Matic’s Classifieds. They are probably hard to find, but worth noting.

Enjoy.

Apr 26
Over Christmas ::: http://vimeo.com/39613317
I took a little road trip to Vermont, to my friend Tennessee Watson and her father Bill.Their beautiful house on the creek, a &#8220;hotbed for radical feminism&#8221; was once owned by Aunt Lou,a jailbird Suffragette, who fought for women&#8217;s right to vote in Vermont. Here&#8217;s her-story.
I&#8217;ve been quite busy developing my next project, feature documentary which I am shooting this summer in Cyprus&#8230;loosely based on an interview i did with Simon Khan. In thinking about the structure of the film, I&#8217;m exploring non traditional documentary forms, others ways of expressing and telling a story and so I have been researching such works.
I picked out a few highlights from experimental filmmaker Trinh T. Minh-ha&#8217;s book Woman, Native, Other - to stay on the topic of feminism. Her writing is abstract, involved and provoking, as are her films, here are some of her thoughts&#160;:
"In this unwonted spectacle made of reality and fiction, where redoubled images form and reform, neither I nor you come first. No primary core of irradiation can be caught hold of, no hierarchical first, second, or third exists except as mere illusion. All is empty when one is plural. Yet how difficult is it to keep our mirrors clean&#8230;Theory oppresses, when it wills or perpetuates existing power relations, when it presents itself as a means to exert authority - the Voice of Knowledge&#8230;And theory as a tool of survival needs to be rethought in relation to gender in discursive practice&#8230; He who represents his own discourse on myths as a myth is acutely aware of the illusion of all reference to a subject as absolute center. The packaging of myths must somehow bear the form of that which it attempts to enclose, if it wishes to come closest to its subject. One cannot seize without smothering,for the will to freeze (capture) brings about a frozen (emptied) object.&#8221;
I also recently read an interesting interview with Armenian filmmaker Artavazd Peleshian in which he talks about his &#8220;distance montage&#8221; method which &#8220;creates a magnetic field around the film&#8230;it allows you to defeat time&#8230;when you reach the end, you&#8217;re also back at the beginning&#8230;And the effect is that the film revolves; it is &#8220;revolution&#8221; in a new sense&#8230;Orbits are created. Sound and image cross each other, intersect each other, switch, change territories. The sound enters the territory of the picture and the image enters the territory of the sound. You start to see the sound, and you hear the picture&#8221;.
He closes his the interview with a thought that deeply resonates with me personally when talking about film and ones work:"I&#8217;ve tried to simplify things to get ideas across. But my films are precisely not about language, about verbal communications. The difficulty is that one cannot express with words what one finds in my films. If it were possible to say it with words, the films would be useless. Words cannot express it. One should not talk about films, one should watch them. This is why I have always been against interviews."
In terms of films to watch, I also checked out a screening of Yugoslavian Experimental Films this past week at Anthology Archives.
Two that stuck out the most are Zelimir Zilnik&#8217;s Inventory and Ivica Matic&#8217;s Classifieds. They are probably hard to find, but worth noting.
Enjoy.

Toward the end of last year ::: http://vimeo.com/39156555

My partner in crime Martyna and I filmed, quite a few actions that extended form the Occupy Wall Street movement, namely the student protests and teach-ins.
One of these was organized by Students United For A Free Cuny in which Louis Reyes Rivera, (poet, lecturer, activist, educator, freedom fighter among other things) passed on some of his wisdom from the 1969 Student Take Over of City College to a new generation of young activists.

Rivera has since passed, earlier this month…this film is dedicated to his memory.
Perhaps his words will resonate with you.
Enjoy.

On a filmic note :::
I just watched Nuri Bilge Ceylan’s Distant - apparently available in its entirety on youtube though i don’t recommend you watch it this way.
The cinematography is mesmerizing (and youtube degrades it).
In watching, in its meditative pace, the viewer feels sucked in - enters another’s life completely.

But…
What I was really inspired by this week was a film by Srdjan Keca, whom I met at the Berlinale Talent Campus last month. His A Letter To Dad is premiering at Full Frame next month. Brilliantly and sensitively crafted… transformative.

Catch it, somewhere.

Mar 26
Toward the end of last year ::: http://vimeo.com/39156555
My partner in crime Martyna and I filmed, quite a few actions that extended form the Occupy Wall Street movement, namely the student protests and teach-ins.One of these was organized by Students United For A Free Cuny in which Louis Reyes Rivera, (poet, lecturer, activist, educator, freedom fighter among other things) passed on some of his wisdom from the 1969 Student Take Over of City College to a new generation of young activists.
Rivera has since passed, earlier this month&#8230;this film is dedicated to his memory.Perhaps his words will resonate with you.Enjoy.
On a filmic note :::I just watched Nuri Bilge Ceylan&#8217;s Distant - apparently available in its entirety on youtube though i don&#8217;t recommend you watch it this way.The cinematography is mesmerizing (and youtube degrades it).In watching, in its meditative pace, the viewer feels sucked in - enters another&#8217;s life completely.
But&#8230;What I was really inspired by this week was a film by Srdjan Keca, whom I met at the Berlinale Talent Campus last month. His A Letter To Dad is premiering at Full Frame next month. Brilliantly and sensitively crafted&#8230; transformative.
Catch it, somewhere.
It&#8217;s 6:38pm in Belgrade. How appropriate!, is my first thought. Once you&#8217;ve watched this new little film, it will be clearer why. The film was made this July in Cyprus, quickly, along the way, for a friend and with a friend&#8230;it incorporates the music of a magical instrument santouri, listen to a bit of its magic here. And of course,  WATCH THE FILM.
I&#8217;ve only a few days left in the Balkans before heading back to New York. On Thursday, I board the train to spend those last few days in Zagreb, Croatia. It&#8217;s the last stop and the place that contains a few remaining images needed for a new film that&#8217;s in the works&#8230; a postcard from the Balkans&#8230;
Along the way Evaporating Borders screened at Sarajevo Film Festival and DokuFest in Prizren where it picked up the Award for Best Balkan Documentary. What a beautiful journey.
Yes, there have been a few films along the way, impactful, transformative ones. Göran Olsson's Concerning Violence is one such film. It is based on &#8220;The Wretched Of The Earth&#8221;, a book on Colonialism by psychiatrist and philosopher Frantz Fanon. Like in his last film, Black Power Mixedtape, Olsson takes old footage from the Swedish television archive to translate the text into film which is narrated by Lauryn Hill. The result is quite brilliant.
If you&#8217;re a MUBI fan, you may have caught Balint Kenyeres' Before Dawn, which is available on Youtube but a shame to watch this 35mm beauty of a film in a watered down, bad quality uploaded version. It&#8217;s a quiet gem, masterful. His other film A History Of Aviation is also up on vimeo.
At DokuFest, I got a chance to check out Linda Vastrik's Forest of The Dancing Spirits. The film was shot in the Congo on 16mm, in the remote depths of the rainforest. It&#8217;s truly a beautiful portrayal of the Yaka/Mbendjele community. In this portrayal the director doesn&#8217;t behind the camera to present this Other world to the viewer. She is present, a participator in the action, and delicately injects herself in a humorous and truthful manner. Not to mention the gorgeous cinematography.
And lastly, Marc Cousins and Mania Akbari's Life May Be is poetry, not so much visual but a genial exploration of thoughts, emotions and expression via an exchange of cinematic letters between the two directors, who had never met until after the film was finished. It was such pleasure to hear their insides.
More soon, two short films are in the works.
Until then, 
Enjoy.
&lt;3
It&#8217;s 6:38pm in Belgrade. How appropriate!, is my first thought. Once you&#8217;ve watched this new little film, it will be clearer why. The film was made this July in Cyprus, quickly, along the way, for a friend and with a friend&#8230;it incorporates the music of a magical instrument santouri, listen to a bit of its magic here. And of course,  WATCH THE FILM.
I&#8217;ve only a few days left in the Balkans before heading back to New York. On Thursday, I board the train to spend those last few days in Zagreb, Croatia. It&#8217;s the last stop and the place that contains a few remaining images needed for a new film that&#8217;s in the works&#8230; a postcard from the Balkans&#8230;
Along the way Evaporating Borders screened at Sarajevo Film Festival and DokuFest in Prizren where it picked up the Award for Best Balkan Documentary. What a beautiful journey.
Yes, there have been a few films along the way, impactful, transformative ones. Göran Olsson's Concerning Violence is one such film. It is based on &#8220;The Wretched Of The Earth&#8221;, a book on Colonialism by psychiatrist and philosopher Frantz Fanon. Like in his last film, Black Power Mixedtape, Olsson takes old footage from the Swedish television archive to translate the text into film which is narrated by Lauryn Hill. The result is quite brilliant.
If you&#8217;re a MUBI fan, you may have caught Balint Kenyeres' Before Dawn, which is available on Youtube but a shame to watch this 35mm beauty of a film in a watered down, bad quality uploaded version. It&#8217;s a quiet gem, masterful. His other film A History Of Aviation is also up on vimeo.
At DokuFest, I got a chance to check out Linda Vastrik's Forest of The Dancing Spirits. The film was shot in the Congo on 16mm, in the remote depths of the rainforest. It&#8217;s truly a beautiful portrayal of the Yaka/Mbendjele community. In this portrayal the director doesn&#8217;t behind the camera to present this Other world to the viewer. She is present, a participator in the action, and delicately injects herself in a humorous and truthful manner. Not to mention the gorgeous cinematography.
And lastly, Marc Cousins and Mania Akbari's Life May Be is poetry, not so much visual but a genial exploration of thoughts, emotions and expression via an exchange of cinematic letters between the two directors, who had never met until after the film was finished. It was such pleasure to hear their insides.
More soon, two short films are in the works.
Until then, 
Enjoy.
&lt;3

It’s 6:38pm in Belgrade. How appropriate!, is my first thought. Once you’ve watched this new little film, it will be clearer why. The film was made this July in Cyprus, quickly, along the way, for a friend and with a friend…it incorporates the music of a magical instrument santouri, listen to a bit of its magic here. And of course,  WATCH THE FILM.

I’ve only a few days left in the Balkans before heading back to New York. On Thursday, I board the train to spend those last few days in Zagreb, Croatia. It’s the last stop and the place that contains a few remaining images needed for a new film that’s in the works… a postcard from the Balkans

Along the way Evaporating Borders screened at Sarajevo Film Festival and DokuFest in Prizren where it picked up the Award for Best Balkan Documentary. What a beautiful journey.

Yes, there have been a few films along the way, impactful, transformative ones. Göran Olsson's Concerning Violence is one such film. It is based on “The Wretched Of The Earth”, a book on Colonialism by psychiatrist and philosopher Frantz Fanon. Like in his last film, Black Power Mixedtape, Olsson takes old footage from the Swedish television archive to translate the text into film which is narrated by Lauryn Hill. The result is quite brilliant.

If you’re a MUBI fan, you may have caught Balint Kenyeres' Before Dawn, which is available on Youtube but a shame to watch this 35mm beauty of a film in a watered down, bad quality uploaded version. It’s a quiet gem, masterful. His other film A History Of Aviation is also up on vimeo.

At DokuFest, I got a chance to check out Linda Vastrik's Forest of The Dancing Spirits. The film was shot in the Congo on 16mm, in the remote depths of the rainforest. It’s truly a beautiful portrayal of the Yaka/Mbendjele community. In this portrayal the director doesn’t behind the camera to present this Other world to the viewer. She is present, a participator in the action, and delicately injects herself in a humorous and truthful manner. Not to mention the gorgeous cinematography.

And lastly, Marc Cousins and Mania Akbari's Life May Be is poetry, not so much visual but a genial exploration of thoughts, emotions and expression via an exchange of cinematic letters between the two directors, who had never met until after the film was finished. It was such pleasure to hear their insides.

More soon, two short films are in the works.

Until then, 

Enjoy.

<3

Yes, it’s been a while since my last post…But a lot has also happened.

It’s been an incredibly busy year, busy with post-production and finishing of my first feature-length film, which is now finally complete and touring the festivals. I’ll quickly summarize the happenings since the film’s completion to make up for the lost time and lack of updates. Hopefully, this is somewhat entertaining. 

Evaporating Borders was completed in January and premiered at International Film Festival Rotterdam to an eager audience!

The film was part of the State of Europe section at the festival along with films like Gianfranco Rossi’s brilliant Sacro Gra and Kaveh Bakhtiari’L’escale. Other gems at the festival included Ilya Khrzhanovsky's 4, Ben Russell and Ben River’s Spell to Ward Off the Darkness (premiering at ND/NF), Ester Martin Bergsmark’s Something Must Break which won the Tiger, Roberto Minervini’s Stop The Pounding Heart (ND/NF), Riad Sattouf’s Jacky Au Royaume des Filles and Vimukthi Jayasundara's The Forsaken Land.

The programming at IFFR is daring and creative… each film had it’s own unique voice and approach and I found the festival as a whole incredibly inspiring.

I joined filmmakers Xiaolu Guo and Thomas Bellinck, as well as Rutger Wolfson on a panel to talk about the State of Europe, spoke to FRED Film Radio on a podcast about the film and came home to NY to find a lovely review of Evaporating Borders by The Hollywood Reporter in which Clarence Tsui calls the film “Thoughtful and lyrical…Radivojevic’s film is a valiant call for a new way of thinking”.

In Rotterdam, we found out the film would have a US premiere at SXSW Film Festival. The film premiered to a full house and received rave reviews.

Film Threat wrote, possibly the best review one could have hoped for, humbling… “Aesthetically, I’ve never seen such magnificent cinematography in a documentary…Equally impressive is Radivojevic’s skill in driving her message home…Evaporating Borders is a must-see movie and its filmmaker is a highly sensitive rarity, with the great ability to open our eyes and change the world.

Nonfics listed Evaporating Borders as one of the Top 5 documentaries at 2014 SXSW Film Festival. Hammer To Nail’s Mike S. Ryan and Jesse Klein selected it as their “Best of SXSW” picks. 

Austin Chronicle described the film as “poetic, stream-of-consciousness narration enhances the beautiful visual essay; its structure – five chapters – serves to efficiently organize a complicated story of shifting borders and cultural paradigms and Cineuropa wrote “through its five chapters full of gentle, honest and simple images, Radivojevic’s story manages to transcend the most thoughtful, and even the most lyrical, aspect of a subject that does not usually have room to accommodate delicacy of any kind.”

The next festival that followed was Thessaloniki Documentary Film Festival. Other films in the program included Michael Obert’s beautiful Song From The Forest and Talal Derki’s Return to Homs, a powerful film.

The audiences in Thessaloniki asked brilliant questions and engaged with the film in the most interesting and intimate way. The kind of discussion that feels organic and productive and enriching. Analytical. A beautiful experience.

From Thessaloniki, the film went to Human Rights Watch London. The conversation there was just as engaging. The best part is that the people relate the story to their own surrounding, their own country and environment. They engage with it on a personal level. At least those who are vocal about it ::: Little Frances’ post summarizes it here.

While there BBC World News Invited us for a chat which was to air live.

A few interviews took place in between, Reelscreen, IndieWire, Filmmaker Mag’s Women of SXSW, Sarah Salovaara’s 5 Questions.

I’m writing all this from Cyprus, where I spent a good portion of the past couple of years making the film. Next week the film will screen at Cyprus Film Days to a local audience. It will be emotional and conflicting and probably intense. We’re looking forward to the discussions.

From there we head to Sarasota FF and HotDocs and luckily the list continues. 

All this to say, that I’m quite overwhelmed and incredibly grateful that the film has found a path and is being well received. It’s been quite special and I couldn’t ask for more. Policies are rarely changed because of documentary films, though I hope it will prove transformative for some.

The life of the film is still in its early stages, but i’m already itching to make, create and work on new projects.

An ivaasks short is long over due and coming soon.

With love.

Enjoy.

Made it! EVAPORATING BORDERS premieres tomorrow, Jan 23rd at 7pm @ IFFR ::: &lt;3 (at Rotterdam)
Made it! EVAPORATING BORDERS premieres tomorrow, Jan 23rd at 7pm @ IFFR ::: &lt;3 (at Rotterdam)

Made it! EVAPORATING BORDERS premieres tomorrow, Jan 23rd at 7pm @ IFFR ::: <3 (at Rotterdam)

I V A A S K S

Posted on Saturday July 27th 2013 at 04:21pm. Its tags are listed below.

I&#8217;m extremely honored, excited and humbled to be included in this year&#8217;s list of 25 New Faces of Independent Film by Filmmaker Magazine, along with 24 other talents. The list profiles a selected range of up and coming film talent and work to keep a look out for. A huge thank you to everyone at Filmmaker for this support.
My feature film &#8220;Evaporating Borders&#8221;, profiled here will also be participating at the IFP Film Week as a part of Spotlight on Documentaries in September. Check out the full list here. 
Exciting times.
I&#8217;m extremely honored, excited and humbled to be included in this year&#8217;s list of 25 New Faces of Independent Film by Filmmaker Magazine, along with 24 other talents. The list profiles a selected range of up and coming film talent and work to keep a look out for. A huge thank you to everyone at Filmmaker for this support.
My feature film &#8220;Evaporating Borders&#8221;, profiled here will also be participating at the IFP Film Week as a part of Spotlight on Documentaries in September. Check out the full list here. 
Exciting times.

I’m extremely honored, excited and humbled to be included in this year’s list of 25 New Faces of Independent Film by Filmmaker Magazine, along with 24 other talents. The list profiles a selected range of up and coming film talent and work to keep a look out for. A huge thank you to everyone at Filmmaker for this support.

My feature film “Evaporating Borders”, profiled here will also be participating at the IFP Film Week as a part of Spotlight on Documentaries in September. Check out the full list here

Exciting times.

WATCH ::: Between Colors Of I 
Just before diving into the the abyss of post production on Evaporating Borders, I sidetracked a little bit and composed this short hybrid short, loosely based on the recent trip through Morocco.
It attempts to borrow from the Proustian narrator, somewhat elusive, somewhat unknown, fluctuating - he exists in an unknown time period in an undefined space. The voiceover is narrated by a talented musician and a new good friend I encountered on the way Yasser Belaiachi.
Otherwise, this week my short Ben&#160;: In The Mind&#8217;s Eye screens at the Brooklyn Film Festival - it shares the screen with 5 other intense films, a really strong program. Today is the last day to check it out!
I would skip Harmony Korine&#8217;s Spring Breakers and watch or re-watch the brilliant Mystery Train by Jim Jarmusch instead&#8230; not that they are connected in anyway, the later is just a beautiful gem I discovered recently.
I&#8217;m switching off for a bit and embracing the beast (of a film).
Enjoy everything.
WATCH ::: Between Colors Of I 
Just before diving into the the abyss of post production on Evaporating Borders, I sidetracked a little bit and composed this short hybrid short, loosely based on the recent trip through Morocco.
It attempts to borrow from the Proustian narrator, somewhat elusive, somewhat unknown, fluctuating - he exists in an unknown time period in an undefined space. The voiceover is narrated by a talented musician and a new good friend I encountered on the way Yasser Belaiachi.
Otherwise, this week my short Ben&#160;: In The Mind&#8217;s Eye screens at the Brooklyn Film Festival - it shares the screen with 5 other intense films, a really strong program. Today is the last day to check it out!
I would skip Harmony Korine&#8217;s Spring Breakers and watch or re-watch the brilliant Mystery Train by Jim Jarmusch instead&#8230; not that they are connected in anyway, the later is just a beautiful gem I discovered recently.
I&#8217;m switching off for a bit and embracing the beast (of a film).
Enjoy everything.

WATCH ::: Between Colors Of I 

Just before diving into the the abyss of post production on Evaporating Borders, I sidetracked a little bit and composed this short hybrid short, loosely based on the recent trip through Morocco.

It attempts to borrow from the Proustian narrator, somewhat elusive, somewhat unknown, fluctuating - he exists in an unknown time period in an undefined space. The voiceover is narrated by a talented musician and a new good friend I encountered on the way Yasser Belaiachi.

Otherwise, this week my short Ben : In The Mind’s Eye screens at the Brooklyn Film Festival - it shares the screen with 5 other intense films, a really strong program. Today is the last day to check it out!

I would skip Harmony Korine’s Spring Breakers and watch or re-watch the brilliant Mystery Train by Jim Jarmusch instead… not that they are connected in anyway, the later is just a beautiful gem I discovered recently.

I’m switching off for a bit and embracing the beast (of a film).

Enjoy everything.

WATCH, Evaporating Borders Excerpt ::: https://vimeo.com/65610353
It&#8217;s an exciting time. My whole summer is dedicated to the post production of my first feature length documentary and definitely the most ambitious of all my work thus far.
It has been an interesting journey and it continues to be.
Over the years I&#8217;ve developed quite an obsession with the Essay Film in the vane of Chris Marker, Agnes Varda, Alain Resnais, Allan Sekula, Harun Farocki. The process allows for exploration and search, it&#8217;s an investigation that doesn&#8217;t necessarily resolve. And it happens to be the most effective way I can express myself in film. I&#8217;m exciting about exploring and pushing those possibilites with this Evaporating Borders.
I was intrigued by some of the thoughts in Timothy Corrigan's book  &#8221;The Essay Film&#160;: From Montaigne, After Marker&#8221; (enjoy this excerpt).
Two films that I found inspiring recently, both over 30 years old are Alain Resnais &#8220;Hiroshima Mon Amour" and Sergej Paradjanov's &#8220;Color of Pomegranates&#8221;. Very different films, but both adventurous, daring, explorative, visually compelling and reflective. Reflecting on memory, tradition, culture and identity.
Enjoy.
WATCH, Evaporating Borders Excerpt ::: https://vimeo.com/65610353
It&#8217;s an exciting time. My whole summer is dedicated to the post production of my first feature length documentary and definitely the most ambitious of all my work thus far.
It has been an interesting journey and it continues to be.
Over the years I&#8217;ve developed quite an obsession with the Essay Film in the vane of Chris Marker, Agnes Varda, Alain Resnais, Allan Sekula, Harun Farocki. The process allows for exploration and search, it&#8217;s an investigation that doesn&#8217;t necessarily resolve. And it happens to be the most effective way I can express myself in film. I&#8217;m exciting about exploring and pushing those possibilites with this Evaporating Borders.
I was intrigued by some of the thoughts in Timothy Corrigan's book  &#8221;The Essay Film&#160;: From Montaigne, After Marker&#8221; (enjoy this excerpt).
Two films that I found inspiring recently, both over 30 years old are Alain Resnais &#8220;Hiroshima Mon Amour" and Sergej Paradjanov's &#8220;Color of Pomegranates&#8221;. Very different films, but both adventurous, daring, explorative, visually compelling and reflective. Reflecting on memory, tradition, culture and identity.
Enjoy.

WATCH, Evaporating Borders Excerpt ::: https://vimeo.com/65610353

It’s an exciting time. My whole summer is dedicated to the post production of my first feature length documentary and definitely the most ambitious of all my work thus far.

It has been an interesting journey and it continues to be.

Over the years I’ve developed quite an obsession with the Essay Film in the vane of Chris Marker, Agnes Varda, Alain Resnais, Allan Sekula, Harun Farocki. The process allows for exploration and search, it’s an investigation that doesn’t necessarily resolve. And it happens to be the most effective way I can express myself in film. I’m exciting about exploring and pushing those possibilites with this Evaporating Borders.

I was intrigued by some of the thoughts in Timothy Corrigan's book  ”The Essay Film : From Montaigne, After Marker” (enjoy this excerpt).

Two films that I found inspiring recently, both over 30 years old are Alain ResnaisHiroshima Mon Amour" and Sergej Paradjanov's “Color of Pomegranates”. Very different films, but both adventurous, daring, explorative, visually compelling and reflective. Reflecting on memory, tradition, culture and identity.

Enjoy.

EVAPORATING BORDERS : on : Ny Times Op-Doc

image

WATCH Our ::: New Times Op - Doc

There’s been quite a lot going on, a busy time and so a while since my last post. In February we wrapped production on our upcoming feature documentary Evaporating Borders, and launched its beautiful website

In the meantime, the New York Times commissioned a short piece based on the material from the film and published my Op-Doc in April. With the controversial subject matter and the extreme economic issues in Cyprus, the short produced an exciting and heated conversations on Facebook and other social media outlets. As hoped for!

While the journalistic approach is not my preferred style of communication, in which a complex story is squeezed in a condensed format, the platform does act as an incredible tool to relay the message and talk about issues that are otherwise tossed aside.

And talking about issues that are tossed aside, a must see film is The Act Of Killing by Joshua Oppenheimer, catch it at the Human Rights Film Festival in New York in June. Joshua’s introduces a new way of documenting, a new way of communicating both in contact with people and through film. The film enters the minds of the perpetrators, makes us like them, draws us into an insane world of bizarre layered multiple realities, imagination and appearances…it’s as much about the Indonesian genocide as it is about ourselves and the art of filmmaking and telling stories. Simply brilliant.

And on the fiction side, Noah Baumbach’s new film Frances Ha is a hilarious adventure, beautifully co-written by the director and Greta Gerwig, my new favorite actress. Loved this film, which my be even more fun and closer to heart for us New Yorkers.

Catch it at IFC!

x

WATCH ::: https://vimeo.com/58313887

While working on my new film, a long form documentary that addresses displacement, tolerance, refugees and people migration and mainly takes place in Cyprus&#8230;I took a little trip to Israel and Palestine. Most asylum seekers in Cyprus are Palestinian, some have never even been to Palestine.I was curious to find out more about the land&#8230; conscious of the privilege I have to explore my curiosity, while they will never be allowed to come near their homeland.
During my brief visit to Palestine, I met Avram, also known as John&#8230;He chatted for a few hours. Here are his thoughts.

Over the winter holidays, I also took a short detour to Morocco&#8230;an intense and beautiful country also polluted by the remnants of colonialism. More visuals and thoughts from there in the next post.

On a filmic note, Sundance just wrapped and published a list of winning films, perhaps some to look out for.
In the meantime, I finally saw  Women On A Verge Of a Nervous Breakdown, Pedro Almodovar's brilliant imagination at its best. Besides the super intelligent narrative dramaturgy, there are various levels of cinematic gems, from colors, compositions, camera movement to symbolic use of objects and devices. Delight!
And one more delightful gem is Tsai Ming-liang&#8217;s short film Walker  that won at Cannes last year, you can watch it in its entirety online. Patience is the word. We&#8217;re working to break and challenge the 30 second attention span.
If you&#8217;re looking for more stimulation, IDFA has a list of short films available for online watching, all of which took part at the festival.
 
Enjoy.
 
 
 
  
WATCH ::: https://vimeo.com/58313887

While working on my new film, a long form documentary that addresses displacement, tolerance, refugees and people migration and mainly takes place in Cyprus&#8230;I took a little trip to Israel and Palestine. Most asylum seekers in Cyprus are Palestinian, some have never even been to Palestine.I was curious to find out more about the land&#8230; conscious of the privilege I have to explore my curiosity, while they will never be allowed to come near their homeland.
During my brief visit to Palestine, I met Avram, also known as John&#8230;He chatted for a few hours. Here are his thoughts.

Over the winter holidays, I also took a short detour to Morocco&#8230;an intense and beautiful country also polluted by the remnants of colonialism. More visuals and thoughts from there in the next post.

On a filmic note, Sundance just wrapped and published a list of winning films, perhaps some to look out for.
In the meantime, I finally saw  Women On A Verge Of a Nervous Breakdown, Pedro Almodovar's brilliant imagination at its best. Besides the super intelligent narrative dramaturgy, there are various levels of cinematic gems, from colors, compositions, camera movement to symbolic use of objects and devices. Delight!
And one more delightful gem is Tsai Ming-liang&#8217;s short film Walker  that won at Cannes last year, you can watch it in its entirety online. Patience is the word. We&#8217;re working to break and challenge the 30 second attention span.
If you&#8217;re looking for more stimulation, IDFA has a list of short films available for online watching, all of which took part at the festival.
 
Enjoy.
 
 
 
  

WATCH ::: https://vimeo.com/58313887

While working on my new film, a long form documentary that addresses displacement, tolerance, refugees and people migration and mainly takes place in Cyprus…I took a little trip to Israel and Palestine. Most asylum seekers in Cyprus are Palestinian, some have never even been to Palestine.
I was curious to find out more about the land… conscious of the privilege I have to explore my curiosity, 
while they will never be allowed to come near their homeland.

During my brief visit to Palestine, I met Avram, also known as John…He chatted for a few hours. Here are his thoughts.

Over the winter holidays, I also took a short detour to Morocco…an intense and beautiful country also polluted by the remnants of colonialism. More visuals and thoughts from there in the next post.

On a filmic note, Sundance just wrapped and published a list of winning films, perhaps some to look out for.

In the meantime, I finally saw  Women On A Verge Of a Nervous Breakdown, Pedro Almodovar's brilliant imagination at its best. Besides the super intelligent narrative dramaturgy, there are various levels of cinematic gems, from colors, compositions, camera movement to symbolic use of objects and devices. Delight!

And one more delightful gem is Tsai Ming-liang’s short film Walker  that won at Cannes last year, you can watch it in its entirety online. Patience is the word. We’re working to break and challenge the 30 second attention span.

If you’re looking for more stimulation, IDFA has a list of short films available for online watching, all of which took part at the festival.

 

Enjoy.

 

 

 

 

WATCH IT HERE : https://vimeo.com/53804072
In April I took a little trip down the Mexico. I purposely left the camera at home and brought only a sound recorder and the sick addictive device that is the iphone. The idea was to not spend the entire trip behind the camera lens but to discover what could be created as an alternative&#8230;So, I resorted to my other (neglected) loves, illustration, photography and animation. It&#8221;s what a day in a small Mexican town felt like.
Last night Union Docs hosted a beautiful screening of shorts by the Brooklyn Filmmakers Collective, it included my short Gawking Red.
I&#8217;ve been deeply impressed by two films recently, one fiction and documentary.
Leo Carax's Holy Motors is a must see, a very Brechtian approach to filmmaking. The viewer is never relaxed into a passive indulgence, but is continuously interrupted by new possibilities. The film is densely layered; it addressed our voyeuristic society, our need for sensationalism, how and why we are entertained. It very much comments on acting, roles and audience.

At the same time watching it, the viewer is trying to decipher between multiple realities, that on film and their own. What is real and for who?
What is beautiful and who decides it is so? It also brings to mind the idea of hybrid identities and as Audre Lorde would say, the possibility of being and assuming multiple identities at the same time.

At the other end&#8230;
In his 10 advice tips for aspiring filmmakers, the brilliant Russian documentary filmmaker Viktor Kossakovsky says &#8220;Don’t film if you want to say something – just say it or write it. Film only if you want to show something, or you want people to see something. This concerns both the film as a whole and every single shot within the film.&#8221; Michael Glawogger's Workingman&#8217;s Death is a perfect example.  The film covers volumes with its succinct simplicity. Just brilliant.

Enjoy.
WATCH IT HERE : https://vimeo.com/53804072
In April I took a little trip down the Mexico. I purposely left the camera at home and brought only a sound recorder and the sick addictive device that is the iphone. The idea was to not spend the entire trip behind the camera lens but to discover what could be created as an alternative&#8230;So, I resorted to my other (neglected) loves, illustration, photography and animation. It&#8221;s what a day in a small Mexican town felt like.
Last night Union Docs hosted a beautiful screening of shorts by the Brooklyn Filmmakers Collective, it included my short Gawking Red.
I&#8217;ve been deeply impressed by two films recently, one fiction and documentary.
Leo Carax's Holy Motors is a must see, a very Brechtian approach to filmmaking. The viewer is never relaxed into a passive indulgence, but is continuously interrupted by new possibilities. The film is densely layered; it addressed our voyeuristic society, our need for sensationalism, how and why we are entertained. It very much comments on acting, roles and audience.

At the same time watching it, the viewer is trying to decipher between multiple realities, that on film and their own. What is real and for who?
What is beautiful and who decides it is so? It also brings to mind the idea of hybrid identities and as Audre Lorde would say, the possibility of being and assuming multiple identities at the same time.

At the other end&#8230;
In his 10 advice tips for aspiring filmmakers, the brilliant Russian documentary filmmaker Viktor Kossakovsky says &#8220;Don’t film if you want to say something – just say it or write it. Film only if you want to show something, or you want people to see something. This concerns both the film as a whole and every single shot within the film.&#8221; Michael Glawogger's Workingman&#8217;s Death is a perfect example.  The film covers volumes with its succinct simplicity. Just brilliant.

Enjoy.

WATCH IT HERE : https://vimeo.com/53804072

In April I took a little trip down the Mexico. I purposely left the camera at home and brought only a sound recorder and the sick addictive device that is the iphone. The idea was to not spend the entire trip behind the camera lens but to discover what could be created as an alternative…So, I resorted to my other (neglected) loves, illustration, photography and animation. It”s what a day in a small Mexican town felt like.

Last night Union Docs hosted a beautiful screening of shorts by the Brooklyn Filmmakers Collective, it included my short Gawking Red.

I’ve been deeply impressed by two films recently, one fiction and documentary.

Leo Carax's Holy Motors is a must see, a very Brechtian approach to filmmaking. The viewer is never relaxed into a passive indulgence, but is continuously interrupted by new possibilities. The film is densely layered; it addressed our voyeuristic society, our need for sensationalism, how and why we are entertained. It very much comments on acting, roles and audience.


At the same time watching it, the viewer is trying to decipher between multiple realities, that on film and their own. What is real and for who?

What is beautiful and who decides it is so? It also brings to mind the idea of hybrid identities and as Audre Lorde would say, the possibility of being and assuming multiple identities at the same time.


At the other end…

In his 10 advice tips for aspiring filmmakers, the brilliant Russian documentary filmmaker Viktor Kossakovsky says “Don’t film if you want to say something – just say it or write it. Film only if you want to show something, or you want people to see something. This concerns both the film as a whole and every single shot within the film.” Michael Glawogger's Workingman’s Death is a perfect example.  The film covers volumes with its succinct simplicity. Just brilliant.


Enjoy.

I V A A S K S

Posted on Monday August 20th 2012 at 07:54pm. Its tags are listed below.

WATCH HERE ::: http://vimeo.com/50014012
This August, 
I ventured off to Pozega, a beautiful small town in Serbia where summer nights are cold and people are warm. While there for a 10 day film workshop InterDOC, we stayed at Hotel Pozega. Each meal was heavy but brilliantly flavored by Milena&#8217;s colorful presence. We caught her just before she took off on her Greek vacation. My partners in crime here and new fantastic friends Isabella Rinaldi and Ana Lucia Ordonez lend their skillful hands. Otherwise the workshop with Zelimir Zilnik and Dragan Elcic were brilliantly insightful.
Otherwise, most of my time was spent in Cyprus and working on my feature-length documentary, working title&#160;: Five Star Country. The blog updates are not as frequent because of it but will be done monthly while I orchestrate this beast of a project. In the meantime, some inspiring films&#8230;oldies, yes&#8230;
Andrei Tarkovsky&#8217;s The Mirror is a beautiful abstraction of past and present, reflecting on time, memory, spaces between reality.
It&#8217;s also cinematic ecstasy.
On the same principle, of time, space, memory, life and death is Gaspar Noe&#8217;s Enter The Void.
This one kind of disturbs you from the inside. But ultimately, the creativity inspires and you remember why you love making films. 
More for September coming soon.
Enjoy.
WATCH HERE ::: http://vimeo.com/50014012
This August, 
I ventured off to Pozega, a beautiful small town in Serbia where summer nights are cold and people are warm. While there for a 10 day film workshop InterDOC, we stayed at Hotel Pozega. Each meal was heavy but brilliantly flavored by Milena&#8217;s colorful presence. We caught her just before she took off on her Greek vacation. My partners in crime here and new fantastic friends Isabella Rinaldi and Ana Lucia Ordonez lend their skillful hands. Otherwise the workshop with Zelimir Zilnik and Dragan Elcic were brilliantly insightful.
Otherwise, most of my time was spent in Cyprus and working on my feature-length documentary, working title&#160;: Five Star Country. The blog updates are not as frequent because of it but will be done monthly while I orchestrate this beast of a project. In the meantime, some inspiring films&#8230;oldies, yes&#8230;
Andrei Tarkovsky&#8217;s The Mirror is a beautiful abstraction of past and present, reflecting on time, memory, spaces between reality.
It&#8217;s also cinematic ecstasy.
On the same principle, of time, space, memory, life and death is Gaspar Noe&#8217;s Enter The Void.
This one kind of disturbs you from the inside. But ultimately, the creativity inspires and you remember why you love making films. 
More for September coming soon.
Enjoy.

WATCH HERE ::: http://vimeo.com/50014012

This August, 

I ventured off to Pozega, a beautiful small town in Serbia where summer nights are cold and people are warm. While there for a 10 day film workshop InterDOC, we stayed at Hotel Pozega. Each meal was heavy but brilliantly flavored by Milena’s colorful presence. We caught her just before she took off on her Greek vacation. My partners in crime here and new fantastic friends Isabella Rinaldi and Ana Lucia Ordonez lend their skillful hands. Otherwise the workshop with Zelimir Zilnik and Dragan Elcic were brilliantly insightful.

Otherwise, most of my time was spent in Cyprus and working on my feature-length documentary, working title : Five Star Country. The blog updates are not as frequent because of it but will be done monthly while I orchestrate this beast of a project. In the meantime, some inspiring films…oldies, yes…

Andrei Tarkovsky’s The Mirror is a beautiful abstraction of past and present, reflecting on time, memory, spaces between reality.

It’s also cinematic ecstasy.

On the same principle, of time, space, memory, life and death is Gaspar Noe’s Enter The Void.

This one kind of disturbs you from the inside. But ultimately, the creativity inspires and you remember why you love making films. 

More for September coming soon.

Enjoy.

Across the seas ::: http://vimeo.com/45797403
I&#8217;m dwelling in Mediterranean waters over the summer and working on my first full length documentarythat addresses the lives of political refugees and asylum seekers on the island of Cyprus. Specifically, it addresses tolerance, migration trends, nation-states/nation-building, changing global dynamics and collapse of Eurocentrism through the lens of current migration trends in Cyprus. It has been an interesting journey and a surreal one.
In between incomprehensible refugee stories of exile and plight I return to my life and consider my own reality.It&#8217;s a difficult adjustment. But more than anything else, it reminds me to appreciate it all.Here on a full moon night, we enjoy Xartini&#8217;s song&#8230;and appreciate the night.
On a filmic note :::Here&#8217;s a brilliant film by Aris Chatzistefanou and Katerina Kitidi that analyzes the crisis in Greece and elsewhere, political agendas and effects of privatization - it features Naomi Klein, Zizek and others. It&#8217;s brilliantly executed and free online ::: CATASTROIKA.
And another brilliant project from Greece, a web doc series that dig into all cultural, socio-economic aspects of the country ::: THE PRISM.
Enjoy.
Across the seas ::: http://vimeo.com/45797403
I&#8217;m dwelling in Mediterranean waters over the summer and working on my first full length documentarythat addresses the lives of political refugees and asylum seekers on the island of Cyprus. Specifically, it addresses tolerance, migration trends, nation-states/nation-building, changing global dynamics and collapse of Eurocentrism through the lens of current migration trends in Cyprus. It has been an interesting journey and a surreal one.
In between incomprehensible refugee stories of exile and plight I return to my life and consider my own reality.It&#8217;s a difficult adjustment. But more than anything else, it reminds me to appreciate it all.Here on a full moon night, we enjoy Xartini&#8217;s song&#8230;and appreciate the night.
On a filmic note :::Here&#8217;s a brilliant film by Aris Chatzistefanou and Katerina Kitidi that analyzes the crisis in Greece and elsewhere, political agendas and effects of privatization - it features Naomi Klein, Zizek and others. It&#8217;s brilliantly executed and free online ::: CATASTROIKA.
And another brilliant project from Greece, a web doc series that dig into all cultural, socio-economic aspects of the country ::: THE PRISM.
Enjoy.

Across the seas ::: http://vimeo.com/45797403

I’m dwelling in Mediterranean waters over the summer and working on my first full length documentary
that addresses the lives of political refugees and asylum seekers on the island of Cyprus. Specifically, it addresses tolerance, migration trends, nation-states/nation-building, changing global dynamics and collapse of Eurocentrism through the lens of current migration trends in Cyprus. It has been an interesting journey and a surreal one.

In between incomprehensible refugee stories of exile and plight I return to my life and consider my own reality.
It’s a difficult adjustment. But more than anything else, it reminds me to appreciate it all.
Here on a full moon night, we enjoy Xartini’s song…and appreciate the night.

On a filmic note :::
Here’s a brilliant film by Aris Chatzistefanou and Katerina Kitidi that analyzes the crisis in Greece and elsewhere, political agendas and effects of privatization - it features Naomi Klein, Zizek and others. It’s brilliantly executed and free online ::: CATASTROIKA.

And another brilliant project from Greece, a web doc series that dig into all cultural, socio-economic aspects of the country ::: 
THE PRISM
.

Enjoy.

June&#8217;s Steel Drum Orchestras ::: http://vimeo.com/45010190
This is very quick and dirty.Last summer my partner in crime Sarah Hagey and I made a short film on Despers USA,a full steel drum orchestra from Trinidad. Throughout the summer, various bands gatherthroughout brooklyn to practice and prepare for the annual competition in September.Last year&#8217;s winners were Adlib, this is a small excerpt of their performance that Sarah and Ihad a pleasure of checking out. The Despers put on a night that featured the best of the bestand asked us to film the event. We haven&#8217;t yet had a chance to edit the entire thing.But here&#8217;s a little taste, I was elevated by Adlib and perhaps you will be too.
Our short film, Despers USA is screening at Rooftop films on June 29th, and theDespers are performing!
Be sure to check it out - they transport you into a trance!
Otherwise, I&#8217;m currently in Cyprus working on my first feature films and so the posts are lessfrequent but are nevertheless coming&#8230;I will be posting some interesting stuff over the summer.
In the meantime,One of my new all time favorite films 5 Broken Cameras.Absolutely ingenius, done jointly by a Palestinian and an Israeli director.It&#8217;s conveys the problems as you have never seen it before, cleverly and emotionally structured.Brilliant editing too.
Find it!
June&#8217;s Steel Drum Orchestras ::: http://vimeo.com/45010190
This is very quick and dirty.Last summer my partner in crime Sarah Hagey and I made a short film on Despers USA,a full steel drum orchestra from Trinidad. Throughout the summer, various bands gatherthroughout brooklyn to practice and prepare for the annual competition in September.Last year&#8217;s winners were Adlib, this is a small excerpt of their performance that Sarah and Ihad a pleasure of checking out. The Despers put on a night that featured the best of the bestand asked us to film the event. We haven&#8217;t yet had a chance to edit the entire thing.But here&#8217;s a little taste, I was elevated by Adlib and perhaps you will be too.
Our short film, Despers USA is screening at Rooftop films on June 29th, and theDespers are performing!
Be sure to check it out - they transport you into a trance!
Otherwise, I&#8217;m currently in Cyprus working on my first feature films and so the posts are lessfrequent but are nevertheless coming&#8230;I will be posting some interesting stuff over the summer.
In the meantime,One of my new all time favorite films 5 Broken Cameras.Absolutely ingenius, done jointly by a Palestinian and an Israeli director.It&#8217;s conveys the problems as you have never seen it before, cleverly and emotionally structured.Brilliant editing too.
Find it!

June’s Steel Drum Orchestras ::: http://vimeo.com/45010190

This is very quick and dirty.
Last summer my partner in crime Sarah Hagey and I made a short film on Despers USA,
a full steel drum orchestra from Trinidad. Throughout the summer, various bands gather
throughout brooklyn to practice and prepare for the annual competition in September.
Last year’s winners were Adlib, this is a small excerpt of their performance that Sarah and I
had a pleasure of checking out. The Despers put on a night that featured the best of the best
and asked us to film the event. We haven’t yet had a chance to edit the entire thing.
But here’s a little taste, I was elevated by Adlib and perhaps you will be too.

Our short film, Despers USA is screening at Rooftop films on June 29th, and the
Despers are performing!

Be sure to check it out - they transport you into a trance!

Otherwise, I’m currently in Cyprus working on my first feature films and so the posts are less
frequent but are nevertheless coming…I will be posting some interesting stuff over the summer.


In the meantime,
One of my new all time favorite films 5 Broken Cameras.
Absolutely ingenius, done jointly by a Palestinian and an Israeli director.
It’s conveys the problems as you have never seen it before, cleverly and emotionally structured.
Brilliant editing too.

Find it!

It&#8217;s been a super busy year so far. Since last year I&#8217;ve been working with Benjamin Moylen on a short film that addresses schizophrenia. It&#8217;s not finally complete, in its 13 minutes of length. Here is a very small excerpt from a the film. Ben is a character portrait of a person living with schizophrenia. The film addresses behaviors and challenges associated with the condition and illustrates how it is channelled into an artistic process.
I was lucky to have lots of advice and assistance on the film namely from the Brooklyn Filmmakers Collective, my comrades from Hunter&#8217;s IMA MFA Program and the brilliant Laura Poitras.
You might enjoy the teaser ::: http://vimeo.com/45010218
On a filmic note :::Yes, I&#8217;m late with this one&#8230;but&#8230;Michael Haneke's Cache is a must see, (he also just won Palme d’Or at Cannes for his new film Amour)Brilliantly constructed, it investigates social infrastructures as a direct result of of French colonial practices andhow these translate into the modernity as social tensions, immigration intolerance, phobia of the outsider and pseudo liberalism&#8230;all this through a window of a guilty conscious of the protagonist.
Here&#8217;s an interesting interview with the director.An insightful quote from it :::&#8221;In all of my films, I try to fuel mistrust in our faith in reality. We know nothing about the world, except the things we have experienced directly. And we can examine these things. But everything else we experience through the media. And this functions like Chinese whispers, a piece of information is related from one person to the next. You only have to look at what Bush does with that. I see it as my aesthetic duty to reflect this. It&#8217;s no coincidence that post-War literature signalled the end of classical narrative literature. It came from the experience of fascism, and the same applies to film.&#8221;
Enjoy.
It&#8217;s been a super busy year so far. Since last year I&#8217;ve been working with Benjamin Moylen on a short film that addresses schizophrenia. It&#8217;s not finally complete, in its 13 minutes of length. Here is a very small excerpt from a the film. Ben is a character portrait of a person living with schizophrenia. The film addresses behaviors and challenges associated with the condition and illustrates how it is channelled into an artistic process.
I was lucky to have lots of advice and assistance on the film namely from the Brooklyn Filmmakers Collective, my comrades from Hunter&#8217;s IMA MFA Program and the brilliant Laura Poitras.
You might enjoy the teaser ::: http://vimeo.com/45010218
On a filmic note :::Yes, I&#8217;m late with this one&#8230;but&#8230;Michael Haneke's Cache is a must see, (he also just won Palme d’Or at Cannes for his new film Amour)Brilliantly constructed, it investigates social infrastructures as a direct result of of French colonial practices andhow these translate into the modernity as social tensions, immigration intolerance, phobia of the outsider and pseudo liberalism&#8230;all this through a window of a guilty conscious of the protagonist.
Here&#8217;s an interesting interview with the director.An insightful quote from it :::&#8221;In all of my films, I try to fuel mistrust in our faith in reality. We know nothing about the world, except the things we have experienced directly. And we can examine these things. But everything else we experience through the media. And this functions like Chinese whispers, a piece of information is related from one person to the next. You only have to look at what Bush does with that. I see it as my aesthetic duty to reflect this. It&#8217;s no coincidence that post-War literature signalled the end of classical narrative literature. It came from the experience of fascism, and the same applies to film.&#8221;
Enjoy.

It’s been a super busy year so far. Since last year I’ve been working with Benjamin Moylen on a short film that addresses schizophrenia. It’s not finally complete, in its 13 minutes of length. Here is a very small excerpt from a the film. Ben is a character portrait of a person living with schizophrenia. The film addresses behaviors and challenges associated with the condition and illustrates how it is channelled into an artistic process.


I was lucky to have lots of advice and assistance on the film namely from the Brooklyn Filmmakers Collective, my comrades from Hunter’s IMA MFA Program and the brilliant Laura Poitras.

You might enjoy the teaser ::: http://vimeo.com/45010218

On a filmic note :::
Yes, I’m late with this one…but…Michael Haneke's Cache is a must see, (he also just won Palme d’Or at Cannes for his new film Amour)
Brilliantly constructed, it investigates social infrastructures as a direct result of of French colonial practices and
how these translate into the modernity as social tensions, immigration intolerance, phobia of the outsider and pseudo liberalism…
all this through a window of a guilty conscious of the protagonist.

Here’s an interesting interview with the director.
An insightful quote from it :::
In all of my films, I try to fuel mistrust in our faith in reality. We know nothing about the world, except the things we have experienced directly. And we can examine these things. But everything else we experience through the media. And this functions like Chinese whispers, a piece of information is related from one person to the next. You only have to look at what Bush does with that. I see it as my aesthetic duty to reflect this. It’s no coincidence that post-War literature signalled the end of classical narrative literature. It came from the experience of fascism, and the same applies to film.

Enjoy.

Over Christmas ::: http://vimeo.com/39613317
I took a little road trip to Vermont, to my friend Tennessee Watson and her father Bill.Their beautiful house on the creek, a &#8220;hotbed for radical feminism&#8221; was once owned by Aunt Lou,a jailbird Suffragette, who fought for women&#8217;s right to vote in Vermont. Here&#8217;s her-story.
I&#8217;ve been quite busy developing my next project, feature documentary which I am shooting this summer in Cyprus&#8230;loosely based on an interview i did with Simon Khan. In thinking about the structure of the film, I&#8217;m exploring non traditional documentary forms, others ways of expressing and telling a story and so I have been researching such works.
I picked out a few highlights from experimental filmmaker Trinh T. Minh-ha&#8217;s book Woman, Native, Other - to stay on the topic of feminism. Her writing is abstract, involved and provoking, as are her films, here are some of her thoughts&#160;:
"In this unwonted spectacle made of reality and fiction, where redoubled images form and reform, neither I nor you come first. No primary core of irradiation can be caught hold of, no hierarchical first, second, or third exists except as mere illusion. All is empty when one is plural. Yet how difficult is it to keep our mirrors clean&#8230;Theory oppresses, when it wills or perpetuates existing power relations, when it presents itself as a means to exert authority - the Voice of Knowledge&#8230;And theory as a tool of survival needs to be rethought in relation to gender in discursive practice&#8230; He who represents his own discourse on myths as a myth is acutely aware of the illusion of all reference to a subject as absolute center. The packaging of myths must somehow bear the form of that which it attempts to enclose, if it wishes to come closest to its subject. One cannot seize without smothering,for the will to freeze (capture) brings about a frozen (emptied) object.&#8221;
I also recently read an interesting interview with Armenian filmmaker Artavazd Peleshian in which he talks about his &#8220;distance montage&#8221; method which &#8220;creates a magnetic field around the film&#8230;it allows you to defeat time&#8230;when you reach the end, you&#8217;re also back at the beginning&#8230;And the effect is that the film revolves; it is &#8220;revolution&#8221; in a new sense&#8230;Orbits are created. Sound and image cross each other, intersect each other, switch, change territories. The sound enters the territory of the picture and the image enters the territory of the sound. You start to see the sound, and you hear the picture&#8221;.
He closes his the interview with a thought that deeply resonates with me personally when talking about film and ones work:"I&#8217;ve tried to simplify things to get ideas across. But my films are precisely not about language, about verbal communications. The difficulty is that one cannot express with words what one finds in my films. If it were possible to say it with words, the films would be useless. Words cannot express it. One should not talk about films, one should watch them. This is why I have always been against interviews."
In terms of films to watch, I also checked out a screening of Yugoslavian Experimental Films this past week at Anthology Archives.
Two that stuck out the most are Zelimir Zilnik&#8217;s Inventory and Ivica Matic&#8217;s Classifieds. They are probably hard to find, but worth noting.
Enjoy.
Over Christmas ::: http://vimeo.com/39613317
I took a little road trip to Vermont, to my friend Tennessee Watson and her father Bill.Their beautiful house on the creek, a &#8220;hotbed for radical feminism&#8221; was once owned by Aunt Lou,a jailbird Suffragette, who fought for women&#8217;s right to vote in Vermont. Here&#8217;s her-story.
I&#8217;ve been quite busy developing my next project, feature documentary which I am shooting this summer in Cyprus&#8230;loosely based on an interview i did with Simon Khan. In thinking about the structure of the film, I&#8217;m exploring non traditional documentary forms, others ways of expressing and telling a story and so I have been researching such works.
I picked out a few highlights from experimental filmmaker Trinh T. Minh-ha&#8217;s book Woman, Native, Other - to stay on the topic of feminism. Her writing is abstract, involved and provoking, as are her films, here are some of her thoughts&#160;:
"In this unwonted spectacle made of reality and fiction, where redoubled images form and reform, neither I nor you come first. No primary core of irradiation can be caught hold of, no hierarchical first, second, or third exists except as mere illusion. All is empty when one is plural. Yet how difficult is it to keep our mirrors clean&#8230;Theory oppresses, when it wills or perpetuates existing power relations, when it presents itself as a means to exert authority - the Voice of Knowledge&#8230;And theory as a tool of survival needs to be rethought in relation to gender in discursive practice&#8230; He who represents his own discourse on myths as a myth is acutely aware of the illusion of all reference to a subject as absolute center. The packaging of myths must somehow bear the form of that which it attempts to enclose, if it wishes to come closest to its subject. One cannot seize without smothering,for the will to freeze (capture) brings about a frozen (emptied) object.&#8221;
I also recently read an interesting interview with Armenian filmmaker Artavazd Peleshian in which he talks about his &#8220;distance montage&#8221; method which &#8220;creates a magnetic field around the film&#8230;it allows you to defeat time&#8230;when you reach the end, you&#8217;re also back at the beginning&#8230;And the effect is that the film revolves; it is &#8220;revolution&#8221; in a new sense&#8230;Orbits are created. Sound and image cross each other, intersect each other, switch, change territories. The sound enters the territory of the picture and the image enters the territory of the sound. You start to see the sound, and you hear the picture&#8221;.
He closes his the interview with a thought that deeply resonates with me personally when talking about film and ones work:"I&#8217;ve tried to simplify things to get ideas across. But my films are precisely not about language, about verbal communications. The difficulty is that one cannot express with words what one finds in my films. If it were possible to say it with words, the films would be useless. Words cannot express it. One should not talk about films, one should watch them. This is why I have always been against interviews."
In terms of films to watch, I also checked out a screening of Yugoslavian Experimental Films this past week at Anthology Archives.
Two that stuck out the most are Zelimir Zilnik&#8217;s Inventory and Ivica Matic&#8217;s Classifieds. They are probably hard to find, but worth noting.
Enjoy.

Over Christmas ::: http://vimeo.com/39613317

I took a little road trip to Vermont, to my friend Tennessee Watson and her father Bill.
Their beautiful house on the creek, a “hotbed for radical feminism” was once owned by Aunt Lou,
a jailbird Suffragette, who fought for women’s right to vote in Vermont. Here’s her-story.

I’ve been quite busy developing my next project, feature documentary which I am shooting this summer in Cyprus…loosely based on an interview i did with Simon Khan. In thinking about the structure of the film, I’m exploring non traditional documentary forms, others ways of expressing and telling a story and so I have been researching such works.

I picked out a few highlights from experimental filmmaker Trinh T. Minh-ha’s book Woman, Native, Other - to stay on the topic of feminism. Her writing is abstract, involved and provoking, as are her films, here are some of her thoughts :

"In this unwonted spectacle made of reality and fiction, where redoubled images form and reform, neither I nor you come first. No primary core of irradiation can be caught hold of, no hierarchical first, second, or third exists except as mere illusion. All is empty when one is plural. Yet how difficult is it to keep our mirrors clean…Theory oppresses, when it wills or perpetuates existing power relations, when it presents itself as a means to exert authority - the Voice of Knowledge…And theory as a tool of survival needs to be rethought in relation to gender in discursive practice… He who represents his own discourse on myths as a myth is acutely aware of the illusion of all reference to a subject as absolute center. The packaging of myths must somehow bear the form of that which it attempts to enclose, if it wishes to come closest to its subject. One cannot seize without smothering,for the will to freeze (capture) brings about a frozen (emptied) object.”

I also recently read an interesting interview with Armenian filmmaker Artavazd Peleshian in which he talks about his “distance montage” method which “creates a magnetic field around the film…it allows you to defeat time…when you reach the end, you’re also back at the beginning…And the effect is that the film revolves; it is “revolution” in a new sense…Orbits are created. Sound and image cross each other, intersect each other, switch, change territories. The sound enters the territory of the picture and the image enters the territory of the sound. You start to see the sound, and you hear the picture”.

He closes his the interview with a thought that deeply resonates with me personally when talking about film and ones work:
"I’ve tried to simplify things to get ideas across. But my films are precisely not about language, about verbal communications. The difficulty is that one cannot express with words what one finds in my films. If it were possible to say it with words, the films would be useless. Words cannot express it. One should not talk about films, one should watch them. This is why I have always been against interviews."

In terms of films to watch, I also checked out a screening of Yugoslavian Experimental Films this past week at Anthology Archives.

Two that stuck out the most are Zelimir Zilnik’s Inventory and Ivica Matic’s Classifieds. They are probably hard to find, but worth noting.

Enjoy.

Toward the end of last year ::: http://vimeo.com/39156555
My partner in crime Martyna and I filmed, quite a few actions that extended form the Occupy Wall Street movement, namely the student protests and teach-ins.One of these was organized by Students United For A Free Cuny in which Louis Reyes Rivera, (poet, lecturer, activist, educator, freedom fighter among other things) passed on some of his wisdom from the 1969 Student Take Over of City College to a new generation of young activists.
Rivera has since passed, earlier this month&#8230;this film is dedicated to his memory.Perhaps his words will resonate with you.Enjoy.
On a filmic note :::I just watched Nuri Bilge Ceylan&#8217;s Distant - apparently available in its entirety on youtube though i don&#8217;t recommend you watch it this way.The cinematography is mesmerizing (and youtube degrades it).In watching, in its meditative pace, the viewer feels sucked in - enters another&#8217;s life completely.
But&#8230;What I was really inspired by this week was a film by Srdjan Keca, whom I met at the Berlinale Talent Campus last month. His A Letter To Dad is premiering at Full Frame next month. Brilliantly and sensitively crafted&#8230; transformative.
Catch it, somewhere.
Toward the end of last year ::: http://vimeo.com/39156555
My partner in crime Martyna and I filmed, quite a few actions that extended form the Occupy Wall Street movement, namely the student protests and teach-ins.One of these was organized by Students United For A Free Cuny in which Louis Reyes Rivera, (poet, lecturer, activist, educator, freedom fighter among other things) passed on some of his wisdom from the 1969 Student Take Over of City College to a new generation of young activists.
Rivera has since passed, earlier this month&#8230;this film is dedicated to his memory.Perhaps his words will resonate with you.Enjoy.
On a filmic note :::I just watched Nuri Bilge Ceylan&#8217;s Distant - apparently available in its entirety on youtube though i don&#8217;t recommend you watch it this way.The cinematography is mesmerizing (and youtube degrades it).In watching, in its meditative pace, the viewer feels sucked in - enters another&#8217;s life completely.
But&#8230;What I was really inspired by this week was a film by Srdjan Keca, whom I met at the Berlinale Talent Campus last month. His A Letter To Dad is premiering at Full Frame next month. Brilliantly and sensitively crafted&#8230; transformative.
Catch it, somewhere.

Toward the end of last year ::: http://vimeo.com/39156555

My partner in crime Martyna and I filmed, quite a few actions that extended form the Occupy Wall Street movement, namely the student protests and teach-ins.
One of these was organized by Students United For A Free Cuny in which Louis Reyes Rivera, (poet, lecturer, activist, educator, freedom fighter among other things) passed on some of his wisdom from the 1969 Student Take Over of City College to a new generation of young activists.

Rivera has since passed, earlier this month…this film is dedicated to his memory.
Perhaps his words will resonate with you.
Enjoy.

On a filmic note :::
I just watched Nuri Bilge Ceylan’s Distant - apparently available in its entirety on youtube though i don’t recommend you watch it this way.
The cinematography is mesmerizing (and youtube degrades it).
In watching, in its meditative pace, the viewer feels sucked in - enters another’s life completely.

But…
What I was really inspired by this week was a film by Srdjan Keca, whom I met at the Berlinale Talent Campus last month. His A Letter To Dad is premiering at Full Frame next month. Brilliantly and sensitively crafted… transformative.

Catch it, somewhere.