I V A A S K S

Documenting The Masses

— @IvaRad on Twitter.

Tagged 3D:

November was a dance month,

WATCH ::: http://vimeo.com/34694148

I saw a beautiful performance piece put together by some friends :::
A brilliant composer (and my collaborator) Alexander Berne whose music transforms, Karolien Soete a talented artist and the Stefanie Nelson Dance Group.
I was touched…here’s a little extract of it.

On the topic of dance…PINA in 3D! Yes!
Probably the first film I really enjoyed watching in 3D. Though I found some of the cuts between interviews and performances a bit awkward, the film is beautiful.
Pina's quotes are inspiring as is Wenders' imaginative direction…and the dancers leave you breathless. To paraphrase Pina's words, “sometimes you're left speechless, when words fail to evoke…then there is dance.” Indeed, watching it I remembered how to feel.

I also recently saw Bombay Beach by Alma Har’el.
Though beautifully shot, dreamy and poetic, the film left no mark. I was struggling to find any transformative purpose to the film.
It portrays impoverished America, romanticizes it and brings it to a theater near you, to watch and feel better about not being an inhabitant of Bombay Beach. The protagonist (a tough old man) opens the film to offer some “wise” insights into life but also happens to be racist.
Is there something romantic about poverty? I saw some pretty pictures but learnt nothing new.

Read "What’s Wrong With The Liberal Documentary" by Jill Godmilow to get a better sense of what we should strive for in documentary films.

Dec 26
November was a dance month,
WATCH ::: http://vimeo.com/34694148
I saw a beautiful performance piece put together by some friends :::A brilliant composer (and my collaborator) Alexander Berne whose music transforms, Karolien Soete a talented artist and the Stefanie Nelson Dance Group.I was touched…here’s a little extract of it.
On the topic of dance…PINA in 3D! Yes!Probably the first film I really enjoyed watching in 3D. Though I found some of the cuts between interviews and performances a bit awkward, the film is beautiful.Pina's quotes are inspiring as is Wenders' imaginative direction…and the dancers leave you breathless. To paraphrase Pina's words, “sometimes you're left speechless, when words fail to evoke…then there is dance.” Indeed, watching it I remembered how to feel.
I also recently saw Bombay Beach by Alma Har’el.Though beautifully shot, dreamy and poetic, the film left no mark. I was struggling to find any transformative purpose to the film.It portrays impoverished America, romanticizes it and brings it to a theater near you, to watch and feel better about not being an inhabitant of Bombay Beach. The protagonist (a tough old man) opens the film to offer some “wise” insights into life but also happens to be racist.Is there something romantic about poverty? I saw some pretty pictures but learnt nothing new.
Read "What’s Wrong With The Liberal Documentary" by Jill Godmilow to get a better sense of what we should strive for in documentary films.

About a month ago, my friend Tara and I ventured off to the Morning Mist Farm. There we met Mary Loudin who lives on 24 acres of forest, meadow and swamp land. She prolongs lives of chickens and has a pet vulture. Her place is a little paradise.

Check it out ::: http://vimeo.com/25868681

Otherwise, I recently read an article by Roger Ebert about film projections in theaters.
It talked about the use of 3D projectors to screen 2D films - the problem being that 3D projection uses polarizers which absorb 50% of the light, resulting in a drastically darker image on screen. And this is most theaters! Since reading the article I’ve been paying close attention and have noticed the difference.
Read the article, it’s insightful.

On films:
I saw Terrence Malick’s Tree of Life. There are definitely parts of the film that are challenging to engage with, i.e. what seemed like a 20min sequence of planets, cosmos, cells etc.
Perhaps it was challenging to me, not because of the content (I rather enjoy watching depictions of the universe) but more because the representations weren’t so spectacular. Now, of course visually this film is absolutely stunning…as if shot is just perfect. I’m not a fan of Brad Pitt or his acting skills but I found the boys were so wonderful I could watch them forever. What I loved most about the film is it’s non linear nature, it’s non conformity to conventional narrative structure.
Malick is daring, allowing the story to fluctuate and be told in an unconstrained manner. I enjoyed being lost and having to find my way through the film.
The audiences have been conditioned to a certain type story structure and pace that caters to the MTV inspired 30sec attention span, which is a real problem. I give full support to filmmakers who attempt to break that mold and cross the boundaries and Tree of Life does just that.
I’ll go see it again.

Jun 27
About a month ago, my friend Tara and I ventured off to the Morning Mist Farm. There we met Mary Loudin who lives on 24 acres of forest, meadow and swamp land. She prolongs lives of chickens and has a pet vulture. Her place is a little paradise. 
Check it out ::: http://vimeo.com/25868681
Otherwise, I recently read an article by Roger Ebert about film projections in theaters.It talked about the use of 3D projectors to screen 2D films - the problem being that 3D projection uses polarizers which absorb 50% of the light, resulting in a drastically darker image on screen. And this is most theaters! Since reading the article I’ve been paying close attention and have noticed the difference.Read the article, it’s insightful.
On films:I saw Terrence Malick’s Tree of Life. There are definitely parts of the film that are challenging to engage with, i.e. what seemed like a 20min sequence of planets, cosmos, cells etc.Perhaps it was challenging to me, not because of the content (I rather enjoy watching depictions of the universe) but more because the representations weren’t so spectacular. Now, of course visually this film is absolutely stunning…as if shot is just perfect. I’m not a fan of Brad Pitt or his acting skills but I found the boys were so wonderful I could watch them forever. What I loved most about the film is it’s non linear nature, it’s non conformity to conventional narrative structure.Malick is daring, allowing the story to fluctuate and be told in an unconstrained manner. I enjoyed being lost and having to find my way through the film.The audiences have been conditioned to a certain type story structure and pace that caters to the MTV inspired 30sec attention span, which is a real problem. I give full support to filmmakers who attempt to break that mold and cross the boundaries and Tree of Life does just that.I’ll go see it again.
November was a dance month,
WATCH ::: http://vimeo.com/34694148
I saw a beautiful performance piece put together by some friends :::A brilliant composer (and my collaborator) Alexander Berne whose music transforms, Karolien Soete a talented artist and the Stefanie Nelson Dance Group.I was touched…here’s a little extract of it.
On the topic of dance…PINA in 3D! Yes!Probably the first film I really enjoyed watching in 3D. Though I found some of the cuts between interviews and performances a bit awkward, the film is beautiful.Pina's quotes are inspiring as is Wenders' imaginative direction…and the dancers leave you breathless. To paraphrase Pina's words, “sometimes you're left speechless, when words fail to evoke…then there is dance.” Indeed, watching it I remembered how to feel.
I also recently saw Bombay Beach by Alma Har’el.Though beautifully shot, dreamy and poetic, the film left no mark. I was struggling to find any transformative purpose to the film.It portrays impoverished America, romanticizes it and brings it to a theater near you, to watch and feel better about not being an inhabitant of Bombay Beach. The protagonist (a tough old man) opens the film to offer some “wise” insights into life but also happens to be racist.Is there something romantic about poverty? I saw some pretty pictures but learnt nothing new.
Read "What’s Wrong With The Liberal Documentary" by Jill Godmilow to get a better sense of what we should strive for in documentary films.
November was a dance month,
WATCH ::: http://vimeo.com/34694148
I saw a beautiful performance piece put together by some friends :::A brilliant composer (and my collaborator) Alexander Berne whose music transforms, Karolien Soete a talented artist and the Stefanie Nelson Dance Group.I was touched…here’s a little extract of it.
On the topic of dance…PINA in 3D! Yes!Probably the first film I really enjoyed watching in 3D. Though I found some of the cuts between interviews and performances a bit awkward, the film is beautiful.Pina's quotes are inspiring as is Wenders' imaginative direction…and the dancers leave you breathless. To paraphrase Pina's words, “sometimes you're left speechless, when words fail to evoke…then there is dance.” Indeed, watching it I remembered how to feel.
I also recently saw Bombay Beach by Alma Har’el.Though beautifully shot, dreamy and poetic, the film left no mark. I was struggling to find any transformative purpose to the film.It portrays impoverished America, romanticizes it and brings it to a theater near you, to watch and feel better about not being an inhabitant of Bombay Beach. The protagonist (a tough old man) opens the film to offer some “wise” insights into life but also happens to be racist.Is there something romantic about poverty? I saw some pretty pictures but learnt nothing new.
Read "What’s Wrong With The Liberal Documentary" by Jill Godmilow to get a better sense of what we should strive for in documentary films.

November was a dance month,

WATCH ::: http://vimeo.com/34694148

I saw a beautiful performance piece put together by some friends :::
A brilliant composer (and my collaborator) Alexander Berne whose music transforms, Karolien Soete a talented artist and the Stefanie Nelson Dance Group.
I was touched…here’s a little extract of it.

On the topic of dance…PINA in 3D! Yes!
Probably the first film I really enjoyed watching in 3D. Though I found some of the cuts between interviews and performances a bit awkward, the film is beautiful.
Pina's quotes are inspiring as is Wenders' imaginative direction…and the dancers leave you breathless. To paraphrase Pina's words, “sometimes you're left speechless, when words fail to evoke…then there is dance.” Indeed, watching it I remembered how to feel.

I also recently saw Bombay Beach by Alma Har’el.
Though beautifully shot, dreamy and poetic, the film left no mark. I was struggling to find any transformative purpose to the film.
It portrays impoverished America, romanticizes it and brings it to a theater near you, to watch and feel better about not being an inhabitant of Bombay Beach. The protagonist (a tough old man) opens the film to offer some “wise” insights into life but also happens to be racist.
Is there something romantic about poverty? I saw some pretty pictures but learnt nothing new.

Read "What’s Wrong With The Liberal Documentary" by Jill Godmilow to get a better sense of what we should strive for in documentary films.

About a month ago, my friend Tara and I ventured off to the Morning Mist Farm. There we met Mary Loudin who lives on 24 acres of forest, meadow and swamp land. She prolongs lives of chickens and has a pet vulture. Her place is a little paradise. 
Check it out ::: http://vimeo.com/25868681
Otherwise, I recently read an article by Roger Ebert about film projections in theaters.It talked about the use of 3D projectors to screen 2D films - the problem being that 3D projection uses polarizers which absorb 50% of the light, resulting in a drastically darker image on screen. And this is most theaters! Since reading the article I’ve been paying close attention and have noticed the difference.Read the article, it’s insightful.
On films:I saw Terrence Malick’s Tree of Life. There are definitely parts of the film that are challenging to engage with, i.e. what seemed like a 20min sequence of planets, cosmos, cells etc.Perhaps it was challenging to me, not because of the content (I rather enjoy watching depictions of the universe) but more because the representations weren’t so spectacular. Now, of course visually this film is absolutely stunning…as if shot is just perfect. I’m not a fan of Brad Pitt or his acting skills but I found the boys were so wonderful I could watch them forever. What I loved most about the film is it’s non linear nature, it’s non conformity to conventional narrative structure.Malick is daring, allowing the story to fluctuate and be told in an unconstrained manner. I enjoyed being lost and having to find my way through the film.The audiences have been conditioned to a certain type story structure and pace that caters to the MTV inspired 30sec attention span, which is a real problem. I give full support to filmmakers who attempt to break that mold and cross the boundaries and Tree of Life does just that.I’ll go see it again.
About a month ago, my friend Tara and I ventured off to the Morning Mist Farm. There we met Mary Loudin who lives on 24 acres of forest, meadow and swamp land. She prolongs lives of chickens and has a pet vulture. Her place is a little paradise. 
Check it out ::: http://vimeo.com/25868681
Otherwise, I recently read an article by Roger Ebert about film projections in theaters.It talked about the use of 3D projectors to screen 2D films - the problem being that 3D projection uses polarizers which absorb 50% of the light, resulting in a drastically darker image on screen. And this is most theaters! Since reading the article I’ve been paying close attention and have noticed the difference.Read the article, it’s insightful.
On films:I saw Terrence Malick’s Tree of Life. There are definitely parts of the film that are challenging to engage with, i.e. what seemed like a 20min sequence of planets, cosmos, cells etc.Perhaps it was challenging to me, not because of the content (I rather enjoy watching depictions of the universe) but more because the representations weren’t so spectacular. Now, of course visually this film is absolutely stunning…as if shot is just perfect. I’m not a fan of Brad Pitt or his acting skills but I found the boys were so wonderful I could watch them forever. What I loved most about the film is it’s non linear nature, it’s non conformity to conventional narrative structure.Malick is daring, allowing the story to fluctuate and be told in an unconstrained manner. I enjoyed being lost and having to find my way through the film.The audiences have been conditioned to a certain type story structure and pace that caters to the MTV inspired 30sec attention span, which is a real problem. I give full support to filmmakers who attempt to break that mold and cross the boundaries and Tree of Life does just that.I’ll go see it again.

About a month ago, my friend Tara and I ventured off to the Morning Mist Farm. There we met Mary Loudin who lives on 24 acres of forest, meadow and swamp land. She prolongs lives of chickens and has a pet vulture. Her place is a little paradise.

Check it out ::: http://vimeo.com/25868681

Otherwise, I recently read an article by Roger Ebert about film projections in theaters.
It talked about the use of 3D projectors to screen 2D films - the problem being that 3D projection uses polarizers which absorb 50% of the light, resulting in a drastically darker image on screen. And this is most theaters! Since reading the article I’ve been paying close attention and have noticed the difference.
Read the article, it’s insightful.

On films:
I saw Terrence Malick’s Tree of Life. There are definitely parts of the film that are challenging to engage with, i.e. what seemed like a 20min sequence of planets, cosmos, cells etc.
Perhaps it was challenging to me, not because of the content (I rather enjoy watching depictions of the universe) but more because the representations weren’t so spectacular. Now, of course visually this film is absolutely stunning…as if shot is just perfect. I’m not a fan of Brad Pitt or his acting skills but I found the boys were so wonderful I could watch them forever. What I loved most about the film is it’s non linear nature, it’s non conformity to conventional narrative structure.
Malick is daring, allowing the story to fluctuate and be told in an unconstrained manner. I enjoyed being lost and having to find my way through the film.
The audiences have been conditioned to a certain type story structure and pace that caters to the MTV inspired 30sec attention span, which is a real problem. I give full support to filmmakers who attempt to break that mold and cross the boundaries and Tree of Life does just that.
I’ll go see it again.