I V A A S K S

Documenting The Masses

— @IvaRad on Twitter.

Tagged Audre Lorde:

WATCH IT HERE : https://vimeo.com/53804072

In April I took a little trip down the Mexico. I purposely left the camera at home and brought only a sound recorder and the sick addictive device that is the iphone. The idea was to not spend the entire trip behind the camera lens but to discover what could be created as an alternative…So, I resorted to my other (neglected) loves, illustration, photography and animation. It”s what a day in a small Mexican town felt like.

Last night Union Docs hosted a beautiful screening of shorts by the Brooklyn Filmmakers Collective, it included my short Gawking Red.

I’ve been deeply impressed by two films recently, one fiction and documentary.

Leo Carax's Holy Motors is a must see, a very Brechtian approach to filmmaking. The viewer is never relaxed into a passive indulgence, but is continuously interrupted by new possibilities. The film is densely layered; it addressed our voyeuristic society, our need for sensationalism, how and why we are entertained. It very much comments on acting, roles and audience.


At the same time watching it, the viewer is trying to decipher between multiple realities, that on film and their own. What is real and for who?

What is beautiful and who decides it is so? It also brings to mind the idea of hybrid identities and as Audre Lorde would say, the possibility of being and assuming multiple identities at the same time.


At the other end…

In his 10 advice tips for aspiring filmmakers, the brilliant Russian documentary filmmaker Viktor Kossakovsky says “Don’t film if you want to say something – just say it or write it. Film only if you want to show something, or you want people to see something. This concerns both the film as a whole and every single shot within the film.” Michael Glawogger's Workingman’s Death is a perfect example.  The film covers volumes with its succinct simplicity. Just brilliant.


Enjoy.

Nov 19
WATCH IT HERE : https://vimeo.com/53804072
In April I took a little trip down the Mexico. I purposely left the camera at home and brought only a sound recorder and the sick addictive device that is the iphone. The idea was to not spend the entire trip behind the camera lens but to discover what could be created as an alternative…So, I resorted to my other (neglected) loves, illustration, photography and animation. It”s what a day in a small Mexican town felt like.
Last night Union Docs hosted a beautiful screening of shorts by the Brooklyn Filmmakers Collective, it included my short Gawking Red.
I’ve been deeply impressed by two films recently, one fiction and documentary.
Leo Carax's Holy Motors is a must see, a very Brechtian approach to filmmaking. The viewer is never relaxed into a passive indulgence, but is continuously interrupted by new possibilities. The film is densely layered; it addressed our voyeuristic society, our need for sensationalism, how and why we are entertained. It very much comments on acting, roles and audience.

At the same time watching it, the viewer is trying to decipher between multiple realities, that on film and their own. What is real and for who?
What is beautiful and who decides it is so? It also brings to mind the idea of hybrid identities and as Audre Lorde would say, the possibility of being and assuming multiple identities at the same time.

At the other end…
In his 10 advice tips for aspiring filmmakers, the brilliant Russian documentary filmmaker Viktor Kossakovsky says “Don’t film if you want to say something – just say it or write it. Film only if you want to show something, or you want people to see something. This concerns both the film as a whole and every single shot within the film.” Michael Glawogger's Workingman’s Death is a perfect example.  The film covers volumes with its succinct simplicity. Just brilliant.

Enjoy.
WATCH IT HERE : https://vimeo.com/53804072
In April I took a little trip down the Mexico. I purposely left the camera at home and brought only a sound recorder and the sick addictive device that is the iphone. The idea was to not spend the entire trip behind the camera lens but to discover what could be created as an alternative…So, I resorted to my other (neglected) loves, illustration, photography and animation. It”s what a day in a small Mexican town felt like.
Last night Union Docs hosted a beautiful screening of shorts by the Brooklyn Filmmakers Collective, it included my short Gawking Red.
I’ve been deeply impressed by two films recently, one fiction and documentary.
Leo Carax's Holy Motors is a must see, a very Brechtian approach to filmmaking. The viewer is never relaxed into a passive indulgence, but is continuously interrupted by new possibilities. The film is densely layered; it addressed our voyeuristic society, our need for sensationalism, how and why we are entertained. It very much comments on acting, roles and audience.

At the same time watching it, the viewer is trying to decipher between multiple realities, that on film and their own. What is real and for who?
What is beautiful and who decides it is so? It also brings to mind the idea of hybrid identities and as Audre Lorde would say, the possibility of being and assuming multiple identities at the same time.

At the other end…
In his 10 advice tips for aspiring filmmakers, the brilliant Russian documentary filmmaker Viktor Kossakovsky says “Don’t film if you want to say something – just say it or write it. Film only if you want to show something, or you want people to see something. This concerns both the film as a whole and every single shot within the film.” Michael Glawogger's Workingman’s Death is a perfect example.  The film covers volumes with its succinct simplicity. Just brilliant.

Enjoy.
WATCH IT HERE : https://vimeo.com/53804072
In April I took a little trip down the Mexico. I purposely left the camera at home and brought only a sound recorder and the sick addictive device that is the iphone. The idea was to not spend the entire trip behind the camera lens but to discover what could be created as an alternative…So, I resorted to my other (neglected) loves, illustration, photography and animation. It”s what a day in a small Mexican town felt like.
Last night Union Docs hosted a beautiful screening of shorts by the Brooklyn Filmmakers Collective, it included my short Gawking Red.
I’ve been deeply impressed by two films recently, one fiction and documentary.
Leo Carax's Holy Motors is a must see, a very Brechtian approach to filmmaking. The viewer is never relaxed into a passive indulgence, but is continuously interrupted by new possibilities. The film is densely layered; it addressed our voyeuristic society, our need for sensationalism, how and why we are entertained. It very much comments on acting, roles and audience.

At the same time watching it, the viewer is trying to decipher between multiple realities, that on film and their own. What is real and for who?
What is beautiful and who decides it is so? It also brings to mind the idea of hybrid identities and as Audre Lorde would say, the possibility of being and assuming multiple identities at the same time.

At the other end…
In his 10 advice tips for aspiring filmmakers, the brilliant Russian documentary filmmaker Viktor Kossakovsky says “Don’t film if you want to say something – just say it or write it. Film only if you want to show something, or you want people to see something. This concerns both the film as a whole and every single shot within the film.” Michael Glawogger's Workingman’s Death is a perfect example.  The film covers volumes with its succinct simplicity. Just brilliant.

Enjoy.

WATCH IT HERE : https://vimeo.com/53804072

In April I took a little trip down the Mexico. I purposely left the camera at home and brought only a sound recorder and the sick addictive device that is the iphone. The idea was to not spend the entire trip behind the camera lens but to discover what could be created as an alternative…So, I resorted to my other (neglected) loves, illustration, photography and animation. It”s what a day in a small Mexican town felt like.

Last night Union Docs hosted a beautiful screening of shorts by the Brooklyn Filmmakers Collective, it included my short Gawking Red.

I’ve been deeply impressed by two films recently, one fiction and documentary.

Leo Carax's Holy Motors is a must see, a very Brechtian approach to filmmaking. The viewer is never relaxed into a passive indulgence, but is continuously interrupted by new possibilities. The film is densely layered; it addressed our voyeuristic society, our need for sensationalism, how and why we are entertained. It very much comments on acting, roles and audience.


At the same time watching it, the viewer is trying to decipher between multiple realities, that on film and their own. What is real and for who?

What is beautiful and who decides it is so? It also brings to mind the idea of hybrid identities and as Audre Lorde would say, the possibility of being and assuming multiple identities at the same time.


At the other end…

In his 10 advice tips for aspiring filmmakers, the brilliant Russian documentary filmmaker Viktor Kossakovsky says “Don’t film if you want to say something – just say it or write it. Film only if you want to show something, or you want people to see something. This concerns both the film as a whole and every single shot within the film.” Michael Glawogger's Workingman’s Death is a perfect example.  The film covers volumes with its succinct simplicity. Just brilliant.


Enjoy.