I V A A S K S

Documenting The Masses

— @IvaRad on Twitter.

Tagged Hotdocs:

Yes, it’s been a while since my last post…But a lot has also happened.

It’s been an incredibly busy year, busy with post-production and finishing of my first feature-length film, which is now finally complete and touring the festivals. I’ll quickly summarize the happenings since the film’s completion to make up for the lost time and lack of updates. Hopefully, this is somewhat entertaining. 

Evaporating Borders was completed in January and premiered at International Film Festival Rotterdam to an eager audience!

The film was part of the State of Europe section at the festival along with films like Gianfranco Rossi’s brilliant Sacro Gra and Kaveh Bakhtiari’L’escale. Other gems at the festival included Ilya Khrzhanovsky's 4, Ben Russell and Ben River’s Spell to Ward Off the Darkness (premiering at ND/NF), Ester Martin Bergsmark’s Something Must Break which won the Tiger, Roberto Minervini’s Stop The Pounding Heart (ND/NF), Riad Sattouf’s Jacky Au Royaume des Filles and Vimukthi Jayasundara's The Forsaken Land.

The programming at IFFR is daring and creative… each film had it’s own unique voice and approach and I found the festival as a whole incredibly inspiring.

I joined filmmakers Xiaolu Guo and Thomas Bellinck, as well as Rutger Wolfson on a panel to talk about the State of Europe, spoke to FRED Film Radio on a podcast about the film and came home to NY to find a lovely review of Evaporating Borders by The Hollywood Reporter in which Clarence Tsui calls the film “Thoughtful and lyrical…Radivojevic’s film is a valiant call for a new way of thinking”.

In Rotterdam, we found out the film would have a US premiere at SXSW Film Festival. The film premiered to a full house and received rave reviews.

Film Threat wrote, possibly the best review one could have hoped for, humbling… “Aesthetically, I’ve never seen such magnificent cinematography in a documentary…Equally impressive is Radivojevic’s skill in driving her message home…Evaporating Borders is a must-see movie and its filmmaker is a highly sensitive rarity, with the great ability to open our eyes and change the world.

Nonfics listed Evaporating Borders as one of the Top 5 documentaries at 2014 SXSW Film Festival. Hammer To Nail’s Mike S. Ryan and Jesse Klein selected it as their “Best of SXSW” picks. 

Austin Chronicle described the film as “poetic, stream-of-consciousness narration enhances the beautiful visual essay; its structure – five chapters – serves to efficiently organize a complicated story of shifting borders and cultural paradigms and Cineuropa wrote “through its five chapters full of gentle, honest and simple images, Radivojevic’s story manages to transcend the most thoughtful, and even the most lyrical, aspect of a subject that does not usually have room to accommodate delicacy of any kind.”

The next festival that followed was Thessaloniki Documentary Film Festival. Other films in the program included Michael Obert’s beautiful Song From The Forest and Talal Derki’s Return to Homs, a powerful film.

The audiences in Thessaloniki asked brilliant questions and engaged with the film in the most interesting and intimate way. The kind of discussion that feels organic and productive and enriching. Analytical. A beautiful experience.

From Thessaloniki, the film went to Human Rights Watch London. The conversation there was just as engaging. The best part is that the people relate the story to their own surrounding, their own country and environment. They engage with it on a personal level. At least those who are vocal about it ::: Little Frances’ post summarizes it here.

While there BBC World News Invited us for a chat which was to air live.

A few interviews took place in between, Reelscreen, IndieWire, Filmmaker Mag’s Women of SXSW, Sarah Salovaara’s 5 Questions.

I’m writing all this from Cyprus, where I spent a good portion of the past couple of years making the film. Next week the film will screen at Cyprus Film Days to a local audience. It will be emotional and conflicting and probably intense. We’re looking forward to the discussions.

From there we head to Sarasota FF and HotDocs and luckily the list continues. 

All this to say, that I’m quite overwhelmed and incredibly grateful that the film has found a path and is being well received. It’s been quite special and I couldn’t ask for more. Policies are rarely changed because of documentary films, though I hope it will prove transformative for some.

The life of the film is still in its early stages, but i’m already itching to make, create and work on new projects.

An ivaasks short is long over due and coming soon.

With love.

Enjoy.

Mar 29

My wonderful teammates (Laura Hadden , Alex Mallis and Tennessee Watson) won the International Documentary Challenge at HotDocs in Toronto. The way it works is, you receive a theme and genre on a Thursday morning and have 5 days to find a topic, characters, produce and deliver a 4-7min documentary film. It’s fun for many reasons but also because you never know where you will find yourself over the course of the next few days.

So this year, we went back for more and welcomed the brilliant Jay Sterrenberg to our team and found ourselves on a 70 year old oil tanker…We can’t release the film just yet but the still image is a teaser. I love this challenge!

On the film front, I watched a couple of interesting docs that were in a way similar.

The first gives a larger scale portrait of modern day society spanning over 10 countries and the other concentrates on small town Middlefart in Denmark.

Abendland from Austrian filmmaker Nikolaus Geyrhalter, though described as a demonstration of “the empowering, unifying, and alienating nature of technology” to me acts more as a brilliant overview of the European society in 2010s…African immigrants are denied residence, Big brother watches on massive camera arrays in London, annual anti-nuclear activist gathering, Spanish boarder patrol watches for illegal activity, thousands of ravers dance in a techno-liscious stadium…

all very very beautiful filmed.

The other film was The Average of the Average by Dutch filmmaker Michael Madsen (not the actor!). He attempts to define the town through 13 chapters of “average” events, approaching the subject matter as if it was to be exhibited in a museum. And it also happens to be Denmark’s first 3D film.

And to end with here’s what Filmmaker Mag’s Scott Macauley is looking forward to at SXSW.

Enjoy.

Mar 05
My wonderful teammates (Laura Hadden , Alex Mallis and Tennessee Watson) won the International Documentary Challenge at HotDocs in Toronto. The way it works is, you receive a theme and genre on a Thursday morning and have 5 days to find a topic, characters, produce and deliver a 4-7min documentary film. It’s fun for many reasons but also because you never know where you will find yourself over the course of the next few days.
So this year, we went back for more and welcomed the brilliant Jay Sterrenberg to our team and found ourselves on a 70 year old oil tanker…We can’t release the film just yet but the still image is a teaser. I love this challenge!
On the film front, I watched a couple of interesting docs that were in a way similar.
The first gives a larger scale portrait of modern day society spanning over 10 countries and the other concentrates on small town Middlefart in Denmark.
Abendland from Austrian filmmaker Nikolaus Geyrhalter, though described as a demonstration of “the empowering, unifying, and alienating nature of technology” to me acts more as a brilliant overview of the European society in 2010s…African immigrants are denied residence, Big brother watches on massive camera arrays in London, annual anti-nuclear activist gathering, Spanish boarder patrol watches for illegal activity, thousands of ravers dance in a techno-liscious stadium…
all very very beautiful filmed.
The other film was The Average of the Average by Dutch filmmaker Michael Madsen (not the actor!). He attempts to define the town through 13 chapters of “average” events, approaching the subject matter as if it was to be exhibited in a museum. And it also happens to be Denmark’s first 3D film.
And to end with here’s what Filmmaker Mag’s Scott Macauley is looking forward to at SXSW.
Enjoy.

Back in March, I ganged up with some friends to take part in the International Documentary Challenge where participants are required to make a film in 5 days with a specific theme and genre (disclosed only on the first day).  Together with my fantastic teammates Tennessee Watson, Laura Hadden and Alex Mallis we tracked down Matt and cooked up this concoction.

WATCH ::: https://vimeo.com/23349102

The great news is we went up to Toronto last week to Hot Docs Film Festival where the finalists were being screened…and…Not only did we make the final round but we also won the challenge and walked away with the prize for Best Film, Best Director and Best Use of Genre. Exciting…! We are eligible for an Audience Award so please take 2 minutes to register and vote for Matthew 24:14

While there I checked out some films, the one that made a lasting impression is a 2008 film by Jean-Pierre Duret and Andrea Santana, Because We Were Born. An incredibly stunning ethnographic film that centers around two 13 year old boys in rural Brazil.  Devoid of interviews, entirely observational and visually ecstatic. Emotional and inspiring. 

Here’s an excerpt from a conversation between the two boys :

Nego, “Do you know who you are, Cocada? “

Cocada: “Yes. I know. “

Nego, “Who are you? “

Cocada “Cocada! I am what I am. 

But I do not know why I lie a lot. “

Nego: “We need partners to know who we are. “

I was also visually inspired by Sira - Songs of The Crescent Moon. A beautiful peek into an old musical traditional of Egypt, as well as culture, politics and structure of the society by Sandra Gysi & Ahmed Abdel Mohsen.  There are scenes that the film could have lived without or have edited differently to make the story flow better - but a treat for the eyes non the less.

And lastly, Kumare which won the Audience Award at SXSW was immensely entertaining.  The director Vikram Ghandi (a fellow Brooklynite) transforms himself into a spiritual guru from India and sets of for Arizona where he finds numerous followers seeking some kind of enlightenment.

Check it out, you’ll be entertained…he got a standing ovation at Hot Docs.

May 02
Back in March, I ganged up with some friends to take part in the International Documentary Challenge where participants are required to make a film in 5 days with a specific theme and genre (disclosed only on the first day).  Together with my fantastic teammates Tennessee Watson, Laura Hadden and Alex Mallis we tracked down Matt and cooked up this concoction.
WATCH ::: https://vimeo.com/23349102
The great news is we went up to Toronto last week to Hot Docs Film Festival where the finalists were being screened…and…Not only did we make the final round but we also won the challenge and walked away with the prize for Best Film, Best Director and Best Use of Genre. Exciting…! We are eligible for an Audience Award so please take 2 minutes to register and vote for Matthew 24:14! 
While there I checked out some films, the one that made a lasting impression is a 2008 film by Jean-Pierre Duret and Andrea Santana, Because We Were Born. An incredibly stunning ethnographic film that centers around two 13 year old boys in rural Brazil.  Devoid of interviews, entirely observational and visually ecstatic. Emotional and inspiring. 
Here’s an excerpt from a conversation between the two boys :
Nego, “Do you know who you are, Cocada? “
Cocada: “Yes. I know. “
Nego, “Who are you? “
Cocada “Cocada! I am what I am. 
But I do not know why I lie a lot. “
Nego: “We need partners to know who we are. “
I was also visually inspired by Sira - Songs of The Crescent Moon. A beautiful peek into an old musical traditional of Egypt, as well as culture, politics and structure of the society by Sandra Gysi & Ahmed Abdel Mohsen.  There are scenes that the film could have lived without or have edited differently to make the story flow better - but a treat for the eyes non the less.
And lastly, Kumare which won the Audience Award at SXSW was immensely entertaining.  The director Vikram Ghandi (a fellow Brooklynite) transforms himself into a spiritual guru from India and sets of for Arizona where he finds numerous followers seeking some kind of enlightenment.
Check it out, you’ll be entertained…he got a standing ovation at Hot Docs.

Yes, it’s been a while since my last post…But a lot has also happened.

It’s been an incredibly busy year, busy with post-production and finishing of my first feature-length film, which is now finally complete and touring the festivals. I’ll quickly summarize the happenings since the film’s completion to make up for the lost time and lack of updates. Hopefully, this is somewhat entertaining. 

Evaporating Borders was completed in January and premiered at International Film Festival Rotterdam to an eager audience!

The film was part of the State of Europe section at the festival along with films like Gianfranco Rossi’s brilliant Sacro Gra and Kaveh Bakhtiari’L’escale. Other gems at the festival included Ilya Khrzhanovsky's 4, Ben Russell and Ben River’s Spell to Ward Off the Darkness (premiering at ND/NF), Ester Martin Bergsmark’s Something Must Break which won the Tiger, Roberto Minervini’s Stop The Pounding Heart (ND/NF), Riad Sattouf’s Jacky Au Royaume des Filles and Vimukthi Jayasundara's The Forsaken Land.

The programming at IFFR is daring and creative… each film had it’s own unique voice and approach and I found the festival as a whole incredibly inspiring.

I joined filmmakers Xiaolu Guo and Thomas Bellinck, as well as Rutger Wolfson on a panel to talk about the State of Europe, spoke to FRED Film Radio on a podcast about the film and came home to NY to find a lovely review of Evaporating Borders by The Hollywood Reporter in which Clarence Tsui calls the film “Thoughtful and lyrical…Radivojevic’s film is a valiant call for a new way of thinking”.

In Rotterdam, we found out the film would have a US premiere at SXSW Film Festival. The film premiered to a full house and received rave reviews.

Film Threat wrote, possibly the best review one could have hoped for, humbling… “Aesthetically, I’ve never seen such magnificent cinematography in a documentary…Equally impressive is Radivojevic’s skill in driving her message home…Evaporating Borders is a must-see movie and its filmmaker is a highly sensitive rarity, with the great ability to open our eyes and change the world.

Nonfics listed Evaporating Borders as one of the Top 5 documentaries at 2014 SXSW Film Festival. Hammer To Nail’s Mike S. Ryan and Jesse Klein selected it as their “Best of SXSW” picks. 

Austin Chronicle described the film as “poetic, stream-of-consciousness narration enhances the beautiful visual essay; its structure – five chapters – serves to efficiently organize a complicated story of shifting borders and cultural paradigms and Cineuropa wrote “through its five chapters full of gentle, honest and simple images, Radivojevic’s story manages to transcend the most thoughtful, and even the most lyrical, aspect of a subject that does not usually have room to accommodate delicacy of any kind.”

The next festival that followed was Thessaloniki Documentary Film Festival. Other films in the program included Michael Obert’s beautiful Song From The Forest and Talal Derki’s Return to Homs, a powerful film.

The audiences in Thessaloniki asked brilliant questions and engaged with the film in the most interesting and intimate way. The kind of discussion that feels organic and productive and enriching. Analytical. A beautiful experience.

From Thessaloniki, the film went to Human Rights Watch London. The conversation there was just as engaging. The best part is that the people relate the story to their own surrounding, their own country and environment. They engage with it on a personal level. At least those who are vocal about it ::: Little Frances’ post summarizes it here.

While there BBC World News Invited us for a chat which was to air live.

A few interviews took place in between, Reelscreen, IndieWire, Filmmaker Mag’s Women of SXSW, Sarah Salovaara’s 5 Questions.

I’m writing all this from Cyprus, where I spent a good portion of the past couple of years making the film. Next week the film will screen at Cyprus Film Days to a local audience. It will be emotional and conflicting and probably intense. We’re looking forward to the discussions.

From there we head to Sarasota FF and HotDocs and luckily the list continues. 

All this to say, that I’m quite overwhelmed and incredibly grateful that the film has found a path and is being well received. It’s been quite special and I couldn’t ask for more. Policies are rarely changed because of documentary films, though I hope it will prove transformative for some.

The life of the film is still in its early stages, but i’m already itching to make, create and work on new projects.

An ivaasks short is long over due and coming soon.

With love.

Enjoy.

My wonderful teammates (Laura Hadden , Alex Mallis and Tennessee Watson) won the International Documentary Challenge at HotDocs in Toronto. The way it works is, you receive a theme and genre on a Thursday morning and have 5 days to find a topic, characters, produce and deliver a 4-7min documentary film. It’s fun for many reasons but also because you never know where you will find yourself over the course of the next few days.
So this year, we went back for more and welcomed the brilliant Jay Sterrenberg to our team and found ourselves on a 70 year old oil tanker…We can’t release the film just yet but the still image is a teaser. I love this challenge!
On the film front, I watched a couple of interesting docs that were in a way similar.
The first gives a larger scale portrait of modern day society spanning over 10 countries and the other concentrates on small town Middlefart in Denmark.
Abendland from Austrian filmmaker Nikolaus Geyrhalter, though described as a demonstration of “the empowering, unifying, and alienating nature of technology” to me acts more as a brilliant overview of the European society in 2010s…African immigrants are denied residence, Big brother watches on massive camera arrays in London, annual anti-nuclear activist gathering, Spanish boarder patrol watches for illegal activity, thousands of ravers dance in a techno-liscious stadium…
all very very beautiful filmed.
The other film was The Average of the Average by Dutch filmmaker Michael Madsen (not the actor!). He attempts to define the town through 13 chapters of “average” events, approaching the subject matter as if it was to be exhibited in a museum. And it also happens to be Denmark’s first 3D film.
And to end with here’s what Filmmaker Mag’s Scott Macauley is looking forward to at SXSW.
Enjoy.
My wonderful teammates (Laura Hadden , Alex Mallis and Tennessee Watson) won the International Documentary Challenge at HotDocs in Toronto. The way it works is, you receive a theme and genre on a Thursday morning and have 5 days to find a topic, characters, produce and deliver a 4-7min documentary film. It’s fun for many reasons but also because you never know where you will find yourself over the course of the next few days.
So this year, we went back for more and welcomed the brilliant Jay Sterrenberg to our team and found ourselves on a 70 year old oil tanker…We can’t release the film just yet but the still image is a teaser. I love this challenge!
On the film front, I watched a couple of interesting docs that were in a way similar.
The first gives a larger scale portrait of modern day society spanning over 10 countries and the other concentrates on small town Middlefart in Denmark.
Abendland from Austrian filmmaker Nikolaus Geyrhalter, though described as a demonstration of “the empowering, unifying, and alienating nature of technology” to me acts more as a brilliant overview of the European society in 2010s…African immigrants are denied residence, Big brother watches on massive camera arrays in London, annual anti-nuclear activist gathering, Spanish boarder patrol watches for illegal activity, thousands of ravers dance in a techno-liscious stadium…
all very very beautiful filmed.
The other film was The Average of the Average by Dutch filmmaker Michael Madsen (not the actor!). He attempts to define the town through 13 chapters of “average” events, approaching the subject matter as if it was to be exhibited in a museum. And it also happens to be Denmark’s first 3D film.
And to end with here’s what Filmmaker Mag’s Scott Macauley is looking forward to at SXSW.
Enjoy.

My wonderful teammates (Laura Hadden , Alex Mallis and Tennessee Watson) won the International Documentary Challenge at HotDocs in Toronto. The way it works is, you receive a theme and genre on a Thursday morning and have 5 days to find a topic, characters, produce and deliver a 4-7min documentary film. It’s fun for many reasons but also because you never know where you will find yourself over the course of the next few days.

So this year, we went back for more and welcomed the brilliant Jay Sterrenberg to our team and found ourselves on a 70 year old oil tanker…We can’t release the film just yet but the still image is a teaser. I love this challenge!

On the film front, I watched a couple of interesting docs that were in a way similar.

The first gives a larger scale portrait of modern day society spanning over 10 countries and the other concentrates on small town Middlefart in Denmark.

Abendland from Austrian filmmaker Nikolaus Geyrhalter, though described as a demonstration of “the empowering, unifying, and alienating nature of technology” to me acts more as a brilliant overview of the European society in 2010s…African immigrants are denied residence, Big brother watches on massive camera arrays in London, annual anti-nuclear activist gathering, Spanish boarder patrol watches for illegal activity, thousands of ravers dance in a techno-liscious stadium…

all very very beautiful filmed.

The other film was The Average of the Average by Dutch filmmaker Michael Madsen (not the actor!). He attempts to define the town through 13 chapters of “average” events, approaching the subject matter as if it was to be exhibited in a museum. And it also happens to be Denmark’s first 3D film.

And to end with here’s what Filmmaker Mag’s Scott Macauley is looking forward to at SXSW.

Enjoy.

Back in March, I ganged up with some friends to take part in the International Documentary Challenge where participants are required to make a film in 5 days with a specific theme and genre (disclosed only on the first day).  Together with my fantastic teammates Tennessee Watson, Laura Hadden and Alex Mallis we tracked down Matt and cooked up this concoction.
WATCH ::: https://vimeo.com/23349102
The great news is we went up to Toronto last week to Hot Docs Film Festival where the finalists were being screened…and…Not only did we make the final round but we also won the challenge and walked away with the prize for Best Film, Best Director and Best Use of Genre. Exciting…! We are eligible for an Audience Award so please take 2 minutes to register and vote for Matthew 24:14! 
While there I checked out some films, the one that made a lasting impression is a 2008 film by Jean-Pierre Duret and Andrea Santana, Because We Were Born. An incredibly stunning ethnographic film that centers around two 13 year old boys in rural Brazil.  Devoid of interviews, entirely observational and visually ecstatic. Emotional and inspiring. 
Here’s an excerpt from a conversation between the two boys :
Nego, “Do you know who you are, Cocada? “
Cocada: “Yes. I know. “
Nego, “Who are you? “
Cocada “Cocada! I am what I am. 
But I do not know why I lie a lot. “
Nego: “We need partners to know who we are. “
I was also visually inspired by Sira - Songs of The Crescent Moon. A beautiful peek into an old musical traditional of Egypt, as well as culture, politics and structure of the society by Sandra Gysi & Ahmed Abdel Mohsen.  There are scenes that the film could have lived without or have edited differently to make the story flow better - but a treat for the eyes non the less.
And lastly, Kumare which won the Audience Award at SXSW was immensely entertaining.  The director Vikram Ghandi (a fellow Brooklynite) transforms himself into a spiritual guru from India and sets of for Arizona where he finds numerous followers seeking some kind of enlightenment.
Check it out, you’ll be entertained…he got a standing ovation at Hot Docs.
Back in March, I ganged up with some friends to take part in the International Documentary Challenge where participants are required to make a film in 5 days with a specific theme and genre (disclosed only on the first day).  Together with my fantastic teammates Tennessee Watson, Laura Hadden and Alex Mallis we tracked down Matt and cooked up this concoction.
WATCH ::: https://vimeo.com/23349102
The great news is we went up to Toronto last week to Hot Docs Film Festival where the finalists were being screened…and…Not only did we make the final round but we also won the challenge and walked away with the prize for Best Film, Best Director and Best Use of Genre. Exciting…! We are eligible for an Audience Award so please take 2 minutes to register and vote for Matthew 24:14! 
While there I checked out some films, the one that made a lasting impression is a 2008 film by Jean-Pierre Duret and Andrea Santana, Because We Were Born. An incredibly stunning ethnographic film that centers around two 13 year old boys in rural Brazil.  Devoid of interviews, entirely observational and visually ecstatic. Emotional and inspiring. 
Here’s an excerpt from a conversation between the two boys :
Nego, “Do you know who you are, Cocada? “
Cocada: “Yes. I know. “
Nego, “Who are you? “
Cocada “Cocada! I am what I am. 
But I do not know why I lie a lot. “
Nego: “We need partners to know who we are. “
I was also visually inspired by Sira - Songs of The Crescent Moon. A beautiful peek into an old musical traditional of Egypt, as well as culture, politics and structure of the society by Sandra Gysi & Ahmed Abdel Mohsen.  There are scenes that the film could have lived without or have edited differently to make the story flow better - but a treat for the eyes non the less.
And lastly, Kumare which won the Audience Award at SXSW was immensely entertaining.  The director Vikram Ghandi (a fellow Brooklynite) transforms himself into a spiritual guru from India and sets of for Arizona where he finds numerous followers seeking some kind of enlightenment.
Check it out, you’ll be entertained…he got a standing ovation at Hot Docs.

Back in March, I ganged up with some friends to take part in the International Documentary Challenge where participants are required to make a film in 5 days with a specific theme and genre (disclosed only on the first day).  Together with my fantastic teammates Tennessee Watson, Laura Hadden and Alex Mallis we tracked down Matt and cooked up this concoction.

WATCH ::: https://vimeo.com/23349102

The great news is we went up to Toronto last week to Hot Docs Film Festival where the finalists were being screened…and…Not only did we make the final round but we also won the challenge and walked away with the prize for Best Film, Best Director and Best Use of Genre. Exciting…! We are eligible for an Audience Award so please take 2 minutes to register and vote for Matthew 24:14

While there I checked out some films, the one that made a lasting impression is a 2008 film by Jean-Pierre Duret and Andrea Santana, Because We Were Born. An incredibly stunning ethnographic film that centers around two 13 year old boys in rural Brazil.  Devoid of interviews, entirely observational and visually ecstatic. Emotional and inspiring. 

Here’s an excerpt from a conversation between the two boys :

Nego, “Do you know who you are, Cocada? “

Cocada: “Yes. I know. “

Nego, “Who are you? “

Cocada “Cocada! I am what I am. 

But I do not know why I lie a lot. “

Nego: “We need partners to know who we are. “

I was also visually inspired by Sira - Songs of The Crescent Moon. A beautiful peek into an old musical traditional of Egypt, as well as culture, politics and structure of the society by Sandra Gysi & Ahmed Abdel Mohsen.  There are scenes that the film could have lived without or have edited differently to make the story flow better - but a treat for the eyes non the less.

And lastly, Kumare which won the Audience Award at SXSW was immensely entertaining.  The director Vikram Ghandi (a fellow Brooklynite) transforms himself into a spiritual guru from India and sets of for Arizona where he finds numerous followers seeking some kind of enlightenment.

Check it out, you’ll be entertained…he got a standing ovation at Hot Docs.