I V A A S K S

Documenting The Masses

— @IvaRad on Twitter.

Tagged International Documentary Challenge:

My wonderful teammates (Laura Hadden , Alex Mallis and Tennessee Watson) won the International Documentary Challenge at HotDocs in Toronto. The way it works is, you receive a theme and genre on a Thursday morning and have 5 days to find a topic, characters, produce and deliver a 4-7min documentary film. It’s fun for many reasons but also because you never know where you will find yourself over the course of the next few days.

So this year, we went back for more and welcomed the brilliant Jay Sterrenberg to our team and found ourselves on a 70 year old oil tanker…We can’t release the film just yet but the still image is a teaser. I love this challenge!

On the film front, I watched a couple of interesting docs that were in a way similar.

The first gives a larger scale portrait of modern day society spanning over 10 countries and the other concentrates on small town Middlefart in Denmark.

Abendland from Austrian filmmaker Nikolaus Geyrhalter, though described as a demonstration of “the empowering, unifying, and alienating nature of technology” to me acts more as a brilliant overview of the European society in 2010s…African immigrants are denied residence, Big brother watches on massive camera arrays in London, annual anti-nuclear activist gathering, Spanish boarder patrol watches for illegal activity, thousands of ravers dance in a techno-liscious stadium…

all very very beautiful filmed.

The other film was The Average of the Average by Dutch filmmaker Michael Madsen (not the actor!). He attempts to define the town through 13 chapters of “average” events, approaching the subject matter as if it was to be exhibited in a museum. And it also happens to be Denmark’s first 3D film.

And to end with here’s what Filmmaker Mag’s Scott Macauley is looking forward to at SXSW.

Enjoy.

Mar 05
My wonderful teammates (Laura Hadden , Alex Mallis and Tennessee Watson) won the International Documentary Challenge at HotDocs in Toronto. The way it works is, you receive a theme and genre on a Thursday morning and have 5 days to find a topic, characters, produce and deliver a 4-7min documentary film. It’s fun for many reasons but also because you never know where you will find yourself over the course of the next few days.
So this year, we went back for more and welcomed the brilliant Jay Sterrenberg to our team and found ourselves on a 70 year old oil tanker…We can’t release the film just yet but the still image is a teaser. I love this challenge!
On the film front, I watched a couple of interesting docs that were in a way similar.
The first gives a larger scale portrait of modern day society spanning over 10 countries and the other concentrates on small town Middlefart in Denmark.
Abendland from Austrian filmmaker Nikolaus Geyrhalter, though described as a demonstration of “the empowering, unifying, and alienating nature of technology” to me acts more as a brilliant overview of the European society in 2010s…African immigrants are denied residence, Big brother watches on massive camera arrays in London, annual anti-nuclear activist gathering, Spanish boarder patrol watches for illegal activity, thousands of ravers dance in a techno-liscious stadium…
all very very beautiful filmed.
The other film was The Average of the Average by Dutch filmmaker Michael Madsen (not the actor!). He attempts to define the town through 13 chapters of “average” events, approaching the subject matter as if it was to be exhibited in a museum. And it also happens to be Denmark’s first 3D film.
And to end with here’s what Filmmaker Mag’s Scott Macauley is looking forward to at SXSW.
Enjoy.

Back in March, I ganged up with some friends to take part in the International Documentary Challenge where participants are required to make a film in 5 days with a specific theme and genre (disclosed only on the first day).  Together with my fantastic teammates Tennessee Watson, Laura Hadden and Alex Mallis we tracked down Matt and cooked up this concoction.

WATCH ::: https://vimeo.com/23349102

The great news is we went up to Toronto last week to Hot Docs Film Festival where the finalists were being screened…and…Not only did we make the final round but we also won the challenge and walked away with the prize for Best Film, Best Director and Best Use of Genre. Exciting…! We are eligible for an Audience Award so please take 2 minutes to register and vote for Matthew 24:14

While there I checked out some films, the one that made a lasting impression is a 2008 film by Jean-Pierre Duret and Andrea Santana, Because We Were Born. An incredibly stunning ethnographic film that centers around two 13 year old boys in rural Brazil.  Devoid of interviews, entirely observational and visually ecstatic. Emotional and inspiring. 

Here’s an excerpt from a conversation between the two boys :

Nego, “Do you know who you are, Cocada? “

Cocada: “Yes. I know. “

Nego, “Who are you? “

Cocada “Cocada! I am what I am. 

But I do not know why I lie a lot. “

Nego: “We need partners to know who we are. “

I was also visually inspired by Sira - Songs of The Crescent Moon. A beautiful peek into an old musical traditional of Egypt, as well as culture, politics and structure of the society by Sandra Gysi & Ahmed Abdel Mohsen.  There are scenes that the film could have lived without or have edited differently to make the story flow better - but a treat for the eyes non the less.

And lastly, Kumare which won the Audience Award at SXSW was immensely entertaining.  The director Vikram Ghandi (a fellow Brooklynite) transforms himself into a spiritual guru from India and sets of for Arizona where he finds numerous followers seeking some kind of enlightenment.

Check it out, you’ll be entertained…he got a standing ovation at Hot Docs.

May 02
Back in March, I ganged up with some friends to take part in the International Documentary Challenge where participants are required to make a film in 5 days with a specific theme and genre (disclosed only on the first day).  Together with my fantastic teammates Tennessee Watson, Laura Hadden and Alex Mallis we tracked down Matt and cooked up this concoction.
WATCH ::: https://vimeo.com/23349102
The great news is we went up to Toronto last week to Hot Docs Film Festival where the finalists were being screened…and…Not only did we make the final round but we also won the challenge and walked away with the prize for Best Film, Best Director and Best Use of Genre. Exciting…! We are eligible for an Audience Award so please take 2 minutes to register and vote for Matthew 24:14! 
While there I checked out some films, the one that made a lasting impression is a 2008 film by Jean-Pierre Duret and Andrea Santana, Because We Were Born. An incredibly stunning ethnographic film that centers around two 13 year old boys in rural Brazil.  Devoid of interviews, entirely observational and visually ecstatic. Emotional and inspiring. 
Here’s an excerpt from a conversation between the two boys :
Nego, “Do you know who you are, Cocada? “
Cocada: “Yes. I know. “
Nego, “Who are you? “
Cocada “Cocada! I am what I am. 
But I do not know why I lie a lot. “
Nego: “We need partners to know who we are. “
I was also visually inspired by Sira - Songs of The Crescent Moon. A beautiful peek into an old musical traditional of Egypt, as well as culture, politics and structure of the society by Sandra Gysi & Ahmed Abdel Mohsen.  There are scenes that the film could have lived without or have edited differently to make the story flow better - but a treat for the eyes non the less.
And lastly, Kumare which won the Audience Award at SXSW was immensely entertaining.  The director Vikram Ghandi (a fellow Brooklynite) transforms himself into a spiritual guru from India and sets of for Arizona where he finds numerous followers seeking some kind of enlightenment.
Check it out, you’ll be entertained…he got a standing ovation at Hot Docs.

This week I enrolled in the 5 day International Documentary Challenge with a group of school friends.

The idea was to make a short doc in 5 days, the theme and genre of which we find out on the first day of the challenge.  Easy enough!  The theme was Movement, the genre a character study.  We decided to document Matt Lewis a firm believer of Harold Camping’s theory that May 21st is Judgement Day.

Though I can’t post the video online just yet…it will be made available once the judging is over.  Most challenging of the challenge is orienting oneself to the group dynamic and adapting ideas to the the ideas of the team…not so easy but a great learning experience.

In the mean time, two fantastic movies I saw recently. A 1964 film by Hiroshi Teshigahara, and my new personal favorite Woman In The Dunes.  Brilliant. Intense. With music by Tôru Takemitsu…Film Forum recently had a retrospective of his work (music composed for film).

And Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s recent film Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives. So beautiful crafted in its simplicity and abstraction. Fascinating. Film Screening tomorrow and More clips soon.

Mar 07
This week I enrolled in the 5 day International Documentary Challenge with a group of school friends.
The idea was to make a short doc in 5 days, the theme and genre of which we find out on the first day of the challenge.  Easy enough!  The theme was Movement, the genre a character study.  We decided to document Matt Lewis a firm believer of Harold Camping’s theory that May 21st is Judgement Day.
Though I can’t post the video online just yet…it will be made available once the judging is over.  Most challenging of the challenge is orienting oneself to the group dynamic and adapting ideas to the the ideas of the team…not so easy but a great learning experience.
In the mean time, two fantastic movies I saw recently. A 1964 film by Hiroshi Teshigahara, and my new personal favorite Woman In The Dunes.  Brilliant. Intense. With music by Tôru Takemitsu…Film Forum recently had a retrospective of his work (music composed for film).
And Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s recent film Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives. So beautiful crafted in its simplicity and abstraction. Fascinating. Film Screening tomorrow and More clips soon.
My wonderful teammates (Laura Hadden , Alex Mallis and Tennessee Watson) won the International Documentary Challenge at HotDocs in Toronto. The way it works is, you receive a theme and genre on a Thursday morning and have 5 days to find a topic, characters, produce and deliver a 4-7min documentary film. It’s fun for many reasons but also because you never know where you will find yourself over the course of the next few days.
So this year, we went back for more and welcomed the brilliant Jay Sterrenberg to our team and found ourselves on a 70 year old oil tanker…We can’t release the film just yet but the still image is a teaser. I love this challenge!
On the film front, I watched a couple of interesting docs that were in a way similar.
The first gives a larger scale portrait of modern day society spanning over 10 countries and the other concentrates on small town Middlefart in Denmark.
Abendland from Austrian filmmaker Nikolaus Geyrhalter, though described as a demonstration of “the empowering, unifying, and alienating nature of technology” to me acts more as a brilliant overview of the European society in 2010s…African immigrants are denied residence, Big brother watches on massive camera arrays in London, annual anti-nuclear activist gathering, Spanish boarder patrol watches for illegal activity, thousands of ravers dance in a techno-liscious stadium…
all very very beautiful filmed.
The other film was The Average of the Average by Dutch filmmaker Michael Madsen (not the actor!). He attempts to define the town through 13 chapters of “average” events, approaching the subject matter as if it was to be exhibited in a museum. And it also happens to be Denmark’s first 3D film.
And to end with here’s what Filmmaker Mag’s Scott Macauley is looking forward to at SXSW.
Enjoy.
My wonderful teammates (Laura Hadden , Alex Mallis and Tennessee Watson) won the International Documentary Challenge at HotDocs in Toronto. The way it works is, you receive a theme and genre on a Thursday morning and have 5 days to find a topic, characters, produce and deliver a 4-7min documentary film. It’s fun for many reasons but also because you never know where you will find yourself over the course of the next few days.
So this year, we went back for more and welcomed the brilliant Jay Sterrenberg to our team and found ourselves on a 70 year old oil tanker…We can’t release the film just yet but the still image is a teaser. I love this challenge!
On the film front, I watched a couple of interesting docs that were in a way similar.
The first gives a larger scale portrait of modern day society spanning over 10 countries and the other concentrates on small town Middlefart in Denmark.
Abendland from Austrian filmmaker Nikolaus Geyrhalter, though described as a demonstration of “the empowering, unifying, and alienating nature of technology” to me acts more as a brilliant overview of the European society in 2010s…African immigrants are denied residence, Big brother watches on massive camera arrays in London, annual anti-nuclear activist gathering, Spanish boarder patrol watches for illegal activity, thousands of ravers dance in a techno-liscious stadium…
all very very beautiful filmed.
The other film was The Average of the Average by Dutch filmmaker Michael Madsen (not the actor!). He attempts to define the town through 13 chapters of “average” events, approaching the subject matter as if it was to be exhibited in a museum. And it also happens to be Denmark’s first 3D film.
And to end with here’s what Filmmaker Mag’s Scott Macauley is looking forward to at SXSW.
Enjoy.

My wonderful teammates (Laura Hadden , Alex Mallis and Tennessee Watson) won the International Documentary Challenge at HotDocs in Toronto. The way it works is, you receive a theme and genre on a Thursday morning and have 5 days to find a topic, characters, produce and deliver a 4-7min documentary film. It’s fun for many reasons but also because you never know where you will find yourself over the course of the next few days.

So this year, we went back for more and welcomed the brilliant Jay Sterrenberg to our team and found ourselves on a 70 year old oil tanker…We can’t release the film just yet but the still image is a teaser. I love this challenge!

On the film front, I watched a couple of interesting docs that were in a way similar.

The first gives a larger scale portrait of modern day society spanning over 10 countries and the other concentrates on small town Middlefart in Denmark.

Abendland from Austrian filmmaker Nikolaus Geyrhalter, though described as a demonstration of “the empowering, unifying, and alienating nature of technology” to me acts more as a brilliant overview of the European society in 2010s…African immigrants are denied residence, Big brother watches on massive camera arrays in London, annual anti-nuclear activist gathering, Spanish boarder patrol watches for illegal activity, thousands of ravers dance in a techno-liscious stadium…

all very very beautiful filmed.

The other film was The Average of the Average by Dutch filmmaker Michael Madsen (not the actor!). He attempts to define the town through 13 chapters of “average” events, approaching the subject matter as if it was to be exhibited in a museum. And it also happens to be Denmark’s first 3D film.

And to end with here’s what Filmmaker Mag’s Scott Macauley is looking forward to at SXSW.

Enjoy.

Back in March, I ganged up with some friends to take part in the International Documentary Challenge where participants are required to make a film in 5 days with a specific theme and genre (disclosed only on the first day).  Together with my fantastic teammates Tennessee Watson, Laura Hadden and Alex Mallis we tracked down Matt and cooked up this concoction.
WATCH ::: https://vimeo.com/23349102
The great news is we went up to Toronto last week to Hot Docs Film Festival where the finalists were being screened…and…Not only did we make the final round but we also won the challenge and walked away with the prize for Best Film, Best Director and Best Use of Genre. Exciting…! We are eligible for an Audience Award so please take 2 minutes to register and vote for Matthew 24:14! 
While there I checked out some films, the one that made a lasting impression is a 2008 film by Jean-Pierre Duret and Andrea Santana, Because We Were Born. An incredibly stunning ethnographic film that centers around two 13 year old boys in rural Brazil.  Devoid of interviews, entirely observational and visually ecstatic. Emotional and inspiring. 
Here’s an excerpt from a conversation between the two boys :
Nego, “Do you know who you are, Cocada? “
Cocada: “Yes. I know. “
Nego, “Who are you? “
Cocada “Cocada! I am what I am. 
But I do not know why I lie a lot. “
Nego: “We need partners to know who we are. “
I was also visually inspired by Sira - Songs of The Crescent Moon. A beautiful peek into an old musical traditional of Egypt, as well as culture, politics and structure of the society by Sandra Gysi & Ahmed Abdel Mohsen.  There are scenes that the film could have lived without or have edited differently to make the story flow better - but a treat for the eyes non the less.
And lastly, Kumare which won the Audience Award at SXSW was immensely entertaining.  The director Vikram Ghandi (a fellow Brooklynite) transforms himself into a spiritual guru from India and sets of for Arizona where he finds numerous followers seeking some kind of enlightenment.
Check it out, you’ll be entertained…he got a standing ovation at Hot Docs.
Back in March, I ganged up with some friends to take part in the International Documentary Challenge where participants are required to make a film in 5 days with a specific theme and genre (disclosed only on the first day).  Together with my fantastic teammates Tennessee Watson, Laura Hadden and Alex Mallis we tracked down Matt and cooked up this concoction.
WATCH ::: https://vimeo.com/23349102
The great news is we went up to Toronto last week to Hot Docs Film Festival where the finalists were being screened…and…Not only did we make the final round but we also won the challenge and walked away with the prize for Best Film, Best Director and Best Use of Genre. Exciting…! We are eligible for an Audience Award so please take 2 minutes to register and vote for Matthew 24:14! 
While there I checked out some films, the one that made a lasting impression is a 2008 film by Jean-Pierre Duret and Andrea Santana, Because We Were Born. An incredibly stunning ethnographic film that centers around two 13 year old boys in rural Brazil.  Devoid of interviews, entirely observational and visually ecstatic. Emotional and inspiring. 
Here’s an excerpt from a conversation between the two boys :
Nego, “Do you know who you are, Cocada? “
Cocada: “Yes. I know. “
Nego, “Who are you? “
Cocada “Cocada! I am what I am. 
But I do not know why I lie a lot. “
Nego: “We need partners to know who we are. “
I was also visually inspired by Sira - Songs of The Crescent Moon. A beautiful peek into an old musical traditional of Egypt, as well as culture, politics and structure of the society by Sandra Gysi & Ahmed Abdel Mohsen.  There are scenes that the film could have lived without or have edited differently to make the story flow better - but a treat for the eyes non the less.
And lastly, Kumare which won the Audience Award at SXSW was immensely entertaining.  The director Vikram Ghandi (a fellow Brooklynite) transforms himself into a spiritual guru from India and sets of for Arizona where he finds numerous followers seeking some kind of enlightenment.
Check it out, you’ll be entertained…he got a standing ovation at Hot Docs.

Back in March, I ganged up with some friends to take part in the International Documentary Challenge where participants are required to make a film in 5 days with a specific theme and genre (disclosed only on the first day).  Together with my fantastic teammates Tennessee Watson, Laura Hadden and Alex Mallis we tracked down Matt and cooked up this concoction.

WATCH ::: https://vimeo.com/23349102

The great news is we went up to Toronto last week to Hot Docs Film Festival where the finalists were being screened…and…Not only did we make the final round but we also won the challenge and walked away with the prize for Best Film, Best Director and Best Use of Genre. Exciting…! We are eligible for an Audience Award so please take 2 minutes to register and vote for Matthew 24:14

While there I checked out some films, the one that made a lasting impression is a 2008 film by Jean-Pierre Duret and Andrea Santana, Because We Were Born. An incredibly stunning ethnographic film that centers around two 13 year old boys in rural Brazil.  Devoid of interviews, entirely observational and visually ecstatic. Emotional and inspiring. 

Here’s an excerpt from a conversation between the two boys :

Nego, “Do you know who you are, Cocada? “

Cocada: “Yes. I know. “

Nego, “Who are you? “

Cocada “Cocada! I am what I am. 

But I do not know why I lie a lot. “

Nego: “We need partners to know who we are. “

I was also visually inspired by Sira - Songs of The Crescent Moon. A beautiful peek into an old musical traditional of Egypt, as well as culture, politics and structure of the society by Sandra Gysi & Ahmed Abdel Mohsen.  There are scenes that the film could have lived without or have edited differently to make the story flow better - but a treat for the eyes non the less.

And lastly, Kumare which won the Audience Award at SXSW was immensely entertaining.  The director Vikram Ghandi (a fellow Brooklynite) transforms himself into a spiritual guru from India and sets of for Arizona where he finds numerous followers seeking some kind of enlightenment.

Check it out, you’ll be entertained…he got a standing ovation at Hot Docs.

This week I enrolled in the 5 day International Documentary Challenge with a group of school friends.
The idea was to make a short doc in 5 days, the theme and genre of which we find out on the first day of the challenge.  Easy enough!  The theme was Movement, the genre a character study.  We decided to document Matt Lewis a firm believer of Harold Camping’s theory that May 21st is Judgement Day.
Though I can’t post the video online just yet…it will be made available once the judging is over.  Most challenging of the challenge is orienting oneself to the group dynamic and adapting ideas to the the ideas of the team…not so easy but a great learning experience.
In the mean time, two fantastic movies I saw recently. A 1964 film by Hiroshi Teshigahara, and my new personal favorite Woman In The Dunes.  Brilliant. Intense. With music by Tôru Takemitsu…Film Forum recently had a retrospective of his work (music composed for film).
And Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s recent film Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives. So beautiful crafted in its simplicity and abstraction. Fascinating. Film Screening tomorrow and More clips soon.
This week I enrolled in the 5 day International Documentary Challenge with a group of school friends.
The idea was to make a short doc in 5 days, the theme and genre of which we find out on the first day of the challenge.  Easy enough!  The theme was Movement, the genre a character study.  We decided to document Matt Lewis a firm believer of Harold Camping’s theory that May 21st is Judgement Day.
Though I can’t post the video online just yet…it will be made available once the judging is over.  Most challenging of the challenge is orienting oneself to the group dynamic and adapting ideas to the the ideas of the team…not so easy but a great learning experience.
In the mean time, two fantastic movies I saw recently. A 1964 film by Hiroshi Teshigahara, and my new personal favorite Woman In The Dunes.  Brilliant. Intense. With music by Tôru Takemitsu…Film Forum recently had a retrospective of his work (music composed for film).
And Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s recent film Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives. So beautiful crafted in its simplicity and abstraction. Fascinating. Film Screening tomorrow and More clips soon.

This week I enrolled in the 5 day International Documentary Challenge with a group of school friends.

The idea was to make a short doc in 5 days, the theme and genre of which we find out on the first day of the challenge.  Easy enough!  The theme was Movement, the genre a character study.  We decided to document Matt Lewis a firm believer of Harold Camping’s theory that May 21st is Judgement Day.

Though I can’t post the video online just yet…it will be made available once the judging is over.  Most challenging of the challenge is orienting oneself to the group dynamic and adapting ideas to the the ideas of the team…not so easy but a great learning experience.

In the mean time, two fantastic movies I saw recently. A 1964 film by Hiroshi Teshigahara, and my new personal favorite Woman In The Dunes.  Brilliant. Intense. With music by Tôru Takemitsu…Film Forum recently had a retrospective of his work (music composed for film).

And Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s recent film Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives. So beautiful crafted in its simplicity and abstraction. Fascinating. Film Screening tomorrow and More clips soon.