I V A A S K S

Documenting The Masses

— @IvaRad on Twitter.

Tagged New Jersey:

It’s been a super busy year so far. Since last year I’ve been working with Benjamin Moylen on a short film that addresses schizophrenia. It’s not finally complete, in its 13 minutes of length. Here is a very small excerpt from a the film. Ben is a character portrait of a person living with schizophrenia. The film addresses behaviors and challenges associated with the condition and illustrates how it is channelled into an artistic process.


I was lucky to have lots of advice and assistance on the film namely from the Brooklyn Filmmakers Collective, my comrades from Hunter’s IMA MFA Program and the brilliant Laura Poitras.

You might enjoy the teaser ::: http://vimeo.com/45010218

On a filmic note :::
Yes, I’m late with this one…but…Michael Haneke's Cache is a must see, (he also just won Palme d’Or at Cannes for his new film Amour)
Brilliantly constructed, it investigates social infrastructures as a direct result of of French colonial practices and
how these translate into the modernity as social tensions, immigration intolerance, phobia of the outsider and pseudo liberalism…
all this through a window of a guilty conscious of the protagonist.

Here’s an interesting interview with the director.
An insightful quote from it :::
In all of my films, I try to fuel mistrust in our faith in reality. We know nothing about the world, except the things we have experienced directly. And we can examine these things. But everything else we experience through the media. And this functions like Chinese whispers, a piece of information is related from one person to the next. You only have to look at what Bush does with that. I see it as my aesthetic duty to reflect this. It’s no coincidence that post-War literature signalled the end of classical narrative literature. It came from the experience of fascism, and the same applies to film.

Enjoy.

May 14
It’s been a super busy year so far. Since last year I’ve been working with Benjamin Moylen on a short film that addresses schizophrenia. It’s not finally complete, in its 13 minutes of length. Here is a very small excerpt from a the film. Ben is a character portrait of a person living with schizophrenia. The film addresses behaviors and challenges associated with the condition and illustrates how it is channelled into an artistic process.
I was lucky to have lots of advice and assistance on the film namely from the Brooklyn Filmmakers Collective, my comrades from Hunter’s IMA MFA Program and the brilliant Laura Poitras.
You might enjoy the teaser ::: http://vimeo.com/45010218
On a filmic note :::Yes, I’m late with this one…but…Michael Haneke's Cache is a must see, (he also just won Palme d’Or at Cannes for his new film Amour)Brilliantly constructed, it investigates social infrastructures as a direct result of of French colonial practices andhow these translate into the modernity as social tensions, immigration intolerance, phobia of the outsider and pseudo liberalism…all this through a window of a guilty conscious of the protagonist.
Here’s an interesting interview with the director.An insightful quote from it :::”In all of my films, I try to fuel mistrust in our faith in reality. We know nothing about the world, except the things we have experienced directly. And we can examine these things. But everything else we experience through the media. And this functions like Chinese whispers, a piece of information is related from one person to the next. You only have to look at what Bush does with that. I see it as my aesthetic duty to reflect this. It’s no coincidence that post-War literature signalled the end of classical narrative literature. It came from the experience of fascism, and the same applies to film.”
Enjoy.

About a month ago, my friend Tara and I ventured off to the Morning Mist Farm. There we met Mary Loudin who lives on 24 acres of forest, meadow and swamp land. She prolongs lives of chickens and has a pet vulture. Her place is a little paradise.

Check it out ::: http://vimeo.com/25868681

Otherwise, I recently read an article by Roger Ebert about film projections in theaters.
It talked about the use of 3D projectors to screen 2D films - the problem being that 3D projection uses polarizers which absorb 50% of the light, resulting in a drastically darker image on screen. And this is most theaters! Since reading the article I’ve been paying close attention and have noticed the difference.
Read the article, it’s insightful.

On films:
I saw Terrence Malick’s Tree of Life. There are definitely parts of the film that are challenging to engage with, i.e. what seemed like a 20min sequence of planets, cosmos, cells etc.
Perhaps it was challenging to me, not because of the content (I rather enjoy watching depictions of the universe) but more because the representations weren’t so spectacular. Now, of course visually this film is absolutely stunning…as if shot is just perfect. I’m not a fan of Brad Pitt or his acting skills but I found the boys were so wonderful I could watch them forever. What I loved most about the film is it’s non linear nature, it’s non conformity to conventional narrative structure.
Malick is daring, allowing the story to fluctuate and be told in an unconstrained manner. I enjoyed being lost and having to find my way through the film.
The audiences have been conditioned to a certain type story structure and pace that caters to the MTV inspired 30sec attention span, which is a real problem. I give full support to filmmakers who attempt to break that mold and cross the boundaries and Tree of Life does just that.
I’ll go see it again.

Jun 27
About a month ago, my friend Tara and I ventured off to the Morning Mist Farm. There we met Mary Loudin who lives on 24 acres of forest, meadow and swamp land. She prolongs lives of chickens and has a pet vulture. Her place is a little paradise. 
Check it out ::: http://vimeo.com/25868681
Otherwise, I recently read an article by Roger Ebert about film projections in theaters.It talked about the use of 3D projectors to screen 2D films - the problem being that 3D projection uses polarizers which absorb 50% of the light, resulting in a drastically darker image on screen. And this is most theaters! Since reading the article I’ve been paying close attention and have noticed the difference.Read the article, it’s insightful.
On films:I saw Terrence Malick’s Tree of Life. There are definitely parts of the film that are challenging to engage with, i.e. what seemed like a 20min sequence of planets, cosmos, cells etc.Perhaps it was challenging to me, not because of the content (I rather enjoy watching depictions of the universe) but more because the representations weren’t so spectacular. Now, of course visually this film is absolutely stunning…as if shot is just perfect. I’m not a fan of Brad Pitt or his acting skills but I found the boys were so wonderful I could watch them forever. What I loved most about the film is it’s non linear nature, it’s non conformity to conventional narrative structure.Malick is daring, allowing the story to fluctuate and be told in an unconstrained manner. I enjoyed being lost and having to find my way through the film.The audiences have been conditioned to a certain type story structure and pace that caters to the MTV inspired 30sec attention span, which is a real problem. I give full support to filmmakers who attempt to break that mold and cross the boundaries and Tree of Life does just that.I’ll go see it again.

Across the pond ::: http://vimeo.com/21910490

A few months back I met Sandra at a storytelling workshop where she told the most interesting tale. I’d been meaning to get together with her since. Finally we met up, today. And I was inspired to edit and assemble this clip at once.  Here’s the story of Sandra and John J…

Otherwise, I just got word that NYWIFT will screen Thread at Anthology Film Archives on June 28th…exciting!  Off to the desert on Friday  - got some new lenses that need testing out!

Apr 04
Across the pond ::: http://vimeo.com/21910490
A few months back I met Sandra at a storytelling workshop where she told the most interesting tale. I’d been meaning to get together with her since. Finally we met up, today. And I was inspired to edit and assemble this clip at once.  Here’s the story of Sandra and John J…
Otherwise, I just got word that NYWIFT will screen Thread at Anthology Film Archives on June 28th…exciting!  Off to the desert on Friday  - got some new lenses that need testing out!
It’s been a super busy year so far. Since last year I’ve been working with Benjamin Moylen on a short film that addresses schizophrenia. It’s not finally complete, in its 13 minutes of length. Here is a very small excerpt from a the film. Ben is a character portrait of a person living with schizophrenia. The film addresses behaviors and challenges associated with the condition and illustrates how it is channelled into an artistic process.
I was lucky to have lots of advice and assistance on the film namely from the Brooklyn Filmmakers Collective, my comrades from Hunter’s IMA MFA Program and the brilliant Laura Poitras.
You might enjoy the teaser ::: http://vimeo.com/45010218
On a filmic note :::Yes, I’m late with this one…but…Michael Haneke's Cache is a must see, (he also just won Palme d’Or at Cannes for his new film Amour)Brilliantly constructed, it investigates social infrastructures as a direct result of of French colonial practices andhow these translate into the modernity as social tensions, immigration intolerance, phobia of the outsider and pseudo liberalism…all this through a window of a guilty conscious of the protagonist.
Here’s an interesting interview with the director.An insightful quote from it :::”In all of my films, I try to fuel mistrust in our faith in reality. We know nothing about the world, except the things we have experienced directly. And we can examine these things. But everything else we experience through the media. And this functions like Chinese whispers, a piece of information is related from one person to the next. You only have to look at what Bush does with that. I see it as my aesthetic duty to reflect this. It’s no coincidence that post-War literature signalled the end of classical narrative literature. It came from the experience of fascism, and the same applies to film.”
Enjoy.
It’s been a super busy year so far. Since last year I’ve been working with Benjamin Moylen on a short film that addresses schizophrenia. It’s not finally complete, in its 13 minutes of length. Here is a very small excerpt from a the film. Ben is a character portrait of a person living with schizophrenia. The film addresses behaviors and challenges associated with the condition and illustrates how it is channelled into an artistic process.
I was lucky to have lots of advice and assistance on the film namely from the Brooklyn Filmmakers Collective, my comrades from Hunter’s IMA MFA Program and the brilliant Laura Poitras.
You might enjoy the teaser ::: http://vimeo.com/45010218
On a filmic note :::Yes, I’m late with this one…but…Michael Haneke's Cache is a must see, (he also just won Palme d’Or at Cannes for his new film Amour)Brilliantly constructed, it investigates social infrastructures as a direct result of of French colonial practices andhow these translate into the modernity as social tensions, immigration intolerance, phobia of the outsider and pseudo liberalism…all this through a window of a guilty conscious of the protagonist.
Here’s an interesting interview with the director.An insightful quote from it :::”In all of my films, I try to fuel mistrust in our faith in reality. We know nothing about the world, except the things we have experienced directly. And we can examine these things. But everything else we experience through the media. And this functions like Chinese whispers, a piece of information is related from one person to the next. You only have to look at what Bush does with that. I see it as my aesthetic duty to reflect this. It’s no coincidence that post-War literature signalled the end of classical narrative literature. It came from the experience of fascism, and the same applies to film.”
Enjoy.

It’s been a super busy year so far. Since last year I’ve been working with Benjamin Moylen on a short film that addresses schizophrenia. It’s not finally complete, in its 13 minutes of length. Here is a very small excerpt from a the film. Ben is a character portrait of a person living with schizophrenia. The film addresses behaviors and challenges associated with the condition and illustrates how it is channelled into an artistic process.


I was lucky to have lots of advice and assistance on the film namely from the Brooklyn Filmmakers Collective, my comrades from Hunter’s IMA MFA Program and the brilliant Laura Poitras.

You might enjoy the teaser ::: http://vimeo.com/45010218

On a filmic note :::
Yes, I’m late with this one…but…Michael Haneke's Cache is a must see, (he also just won Palme d’Or at Cannes for his new film Amour)
Brilliantly constructed, it investigates social infrastructures as a direct result of of French colonial practices and
how these translate into the modernity as social tensions, immigration intolerance, phobia of the outsider and pseudo liberalism…
all this through a window of a guilty conscious of the protagonist.

Here’s an interesting interview with the director.
An insightful quote from it :::
In all of my films, I try to fuel mistrust in our faith in reality. We know nothing about the world, except the things we have experienced directly. And we can examine these things. But everything else we experience through the media. And this functions like Chinese whispers, a piece of information is related from one person to the next. You only have to look at what Bush does with that. I see it as my aesthetic duty to reflect this. It’s no coincidence that post-War literature signalled the end of classical narrative literature. It came from the experience of fascism, and the same applies to film.

Enjoy.

About a month ago, my friend Tara and I ventured off to the Morning Mist Farm. There we met Mary Loudin who lives on 24 acres of forest, meadow and swamp land. She prolongs lives of chickens and has a pet vulture. Her place is a little paradise. 
Check it out ::: http://vimeo.com/25868681
Otherwise, I recently read an article by Roger Ebert about film projections in theaters.It talked about the use of 3D projectors to screen 2D films - the problem being that 3D projection uses polarizers which absorb 50% of the light, resulting in a drastically darker image on screen. And this is most theaters! Since reading the article I’ve been paying close attention and have noticed the difference.Read the article, it’s insightful.
On films:I saw Terrence Malick’s Tree of Life. There are definitely parts of the film that are challenging to engage with, i.e. what seemed like a 20min sequence of planets, cosmos, cells etc.Perhaps it was challenging to me, not because of the content (I rather enjoy watching depictions of the universe) but more because the representations weren’t so spectacular. Now, of course visually this film is absolutely stunning…as if shot is just perfect. I’m not a fan of Brad Pitt or his acting skills but I found the boys were so wonderful I could watch them forever. What I loved most about the film is it’s non linear nature, it’s non conformity to conventional narrative structure.Malick is daring, allowing the story to fluctuate and be told in an unconstrained manner. I enjoyed being lost and having to find my way through the film.The audiences have been conditioned to a certain type story structure and pace that caters to the MTV inspired 30sec attention span, which is a real problem. I give full support to filmmakers who attempt to break that mold and cross the boundaries and Tree of Life does just that.I’ll go see it again.
About a month ago, my friend Tara and I ventured off to the Morning Mist Farm. There we met Mary Loudin who lives on 24 acres of forest, meadow and swamp land. She prolongs lives of chickens and has a pet vulture. Her place is a little paradise. 
Check it out ::: http://vimeo.com/25868681
Otherwise, I recently read an article by Roger Ebert about film projections in theaters.It talked about the use of 3D projectors to screen 2D films - the problem being that 3D projection uses polarizers which absorb 50% of the light, resulting in a drastically darker image on screen. And this is most theaters! Since reading the article I’ve been paying close attention and have noticed the difference.Read the article, it’s insightful.
On films:I saw Terrence Malick’s Tree of Life. There are definitely parts of the film that are challenging to engage with, i.e. what seemed like a 20min sequence of planets, cosmos, cells etc.Perhaps it was challenging to me, not because of the content (I rather enjoy watching depictions of the universe) but more because the representations weren’t so spectacular. Now, of course visually this film is absolutely stunning…as if shot is just perfect. I’m not a fan of Brad Pitt or his acting skills but I found the boys were so wonderful I could watch them forever. What I loved most about the film is it’s non linear nature, it’s non conformity to conventional narrative structure.Malick is daring, allowing the story to fluctuate and be told in an unconstrained manner. I enjoyed being lost and having to find my way through the film.The audiences have been conditioned to a certain type story structure and pace that caters to the MTV inspired 30sec attention span, which is a real problem. I give full support to filmmakers who attempt to break that mold and cross the boundaries and Tree of Life does just that.I’ll go see it again.

About a month ago, my friend Tara and I ventured off to the Morning Mist Farm. There we met Mary Loudin who lives on 24 acres of forest, meadow and swamp land. She prolongs lives of chickens and has a pet vulture. Her place is a little paradise.

Check it out ::: http://vimeo.com/25868681

Otherwise, I recently read an article by Roger Ebert about film projections in theaters.
It talked about the use of 3D projectors to screen 2D films - the problem being that 3D projection uses polarizers which absorb 50% of the light, resulting in a drastically darker image on screen. And this is most theaters! Since reading the article I’ve been paying close attention and have noticed the difference.
Read the article, it’s insightful.

On films:
I saw Terrence Malick’s Tree of Life. There are definitely parts of the film that are challenging to engage with, i.e. what seemed like a 20min sequence of planets, cosmos, cells etc.
Perhaps it was challenging to me, not because of the content (I rather enjoy watching depictions of the universe) but more because the representations weren’t so spectacular. Now, of course visually this film is absolutely stunning…as if shot is just perfect. I’m not a fan of Brad Pitt or his acting skills but I found the boys were so wonderful I could watch them forever. What I loved most about the film is it’s non linear nature, it’s non conformity to conventional narrative structure.
Malick is daring, allowing the story to fluctuate and be told in an unconstrained manner. I enjoyed being lost and having to find my way through the film.
The audiences have been conditioned to a certain type story structure and pace that caters to the MTV inspired 30sec attention span, which is a real problem. I give full support to filmmakers who attempt to break that mold and cross the boundaries and Tree of Life does just that.
I’ll go see it again.

I V A A S K S

Posted on Sunday April 4th 2010 at 05:33pm. Its tags are listed below.

Across the pond ::: http://vimeo.com/21910490
A few months back I met Sandra at a storytelling workshop where she told the most interesting tale. I’d been meaning to get together with her since. Finally we met up, today. And I was inspired to edit and assemble this clip at once.  Here’s the story of Sandra and John J…
Otherwise, I just got word that NYWIFT will screen Thread at Anthology Film Archives on June 28th…exciting!  Off to the desert on Friday  - got some new lenses that need testing out!
Across the pond ::: http://vimeo.com/21910490
A few months back I met Sandra at a storytelling workshop where she told the most interesting tale. I’d been meaning to get together with her since. Finally we met up, today. And I was inspired to edit and assemble this clip at once.  Here’s the story of Sandra and John J…
Otherwise, I just got word that NYWIFT will screen Thread at Anthology Film Archives on June 28th…exciting!  Off to the desert on Friday  - got some new lenses that need testing out!

Across the pond ::: http://vimeo.com/21910490

A few months back I met Sandra at a storytelling workshop where she told the most interesting tale. I’d been meaning to get together with her since. Finally we met up, today. And I was inspired to edit and assemble this clip at once.  Here’s the story of Sandra and John J…

Otherwise, I just got word that NYWIFT will screen Thread at Anthology Film Archives on June 28th…exciting!  Off to the desert on Friday  - got some new lenses that need testing out!