I V A A S K S

Documenting The Masses

— @IvaRad on Twitter.

Tagged New York:

June’s Steel Drum Orchestras ::: http://vimeo.com/45010190

This is very quick and dirty.
Last summer my partner in crime Sarah Hagey and I made a short film on Despers USA,
a full steel drum orchestra from Trinidad. Throughout the summer, various bands gather
throughout brooklyn to practice and prepare for the annual competition in September.
Last year’s winners were Adlib, this is a small excerpt of their performance that Sarah and I
had a pleasure of checking out. The Despers put on a night that featured the best of the best
and asked us to film the event. We haven’t yet had a chance to edit the entire thing.
But here’s a little taste, I was elevated by Adlib and perhaps you will be too.

Our short film, Despers USA is screening at Rooftop films on June 29th, and the
Despers are performing!

Be sure to check it out - they transport you into a trance!

Otherwise, I’m currently in Cyprus working on my first feature films and so the posts are less
frequent but are nevertheless coming…I will be posting some interesting stuff over the summer.


In the meantime,
One of my new all time favorite films 5 Broken Cameras.
Absolutely ingenius, done jointly by a Palestinian and an Israeli director.
It’s conveys the problems as you have never seen it before, cleverly and emotionally structured.
Brilliant editing too.

Find it!

Jun 18
June’s Steel Drum Orchestras ::: http://vimeo.com/45010190
This is very quick and dirty.Last summer my partner in crime Sarah Hagey and I made a short film on Despers USA,a full steel drum orchestra from Trinidad. Throughout the summer, various bands gatherthroughout brooklyn to practice and prepare for the annual competition in September.Last year’s winners were Adlib, this is a small excerpt of their performance that Sarah and Ihad a pleasure of checking out. The Despers put on a night that featured the best of the bestand asked us to film the event. We haven’t yet had a chance to edit the entire thing.But here’s a little taste, I was elevated by Adlib and perhaps you will be too.
Our short film, Despers USA is screening at Rooftop films on June 29th, and theDespers are performing!
Be sure to check it out - they transport you into a trance!
Otherwise, I’m currently in Cyprus working on my first feature films and so the posts are lessfrequent but are nevertheless coming…I will be posting some interesting stuff over the summer.
In the meantime,One of my new all time favorite films 5 Broken Cameras.Absolutely ingenius, done jointly by a Palestinian and an Israeli director.It’s conveys the problems as you have never seen it before, cleverly and emotionally structured.Brilliant editing too.
Find it!

Toward the end of last year ::: http://vimeo.com/39156555

My partner in crime Martyna and I filmed, quite a few actions that extended form the Occupy Wall Street movement, namely the student protests and teach-ins.
One of these was organized by Students United For A Free Cuny in which Louis Reyes Rivera, (poet, lecturer, activist, educator, freedom fighter among other things) passed on some of his wisdom from the 1969 Student Take Over of City College to a new generation of young activists.

Rivera has since passed, earlier this month…this film is dedicated to his memory.
Perhaps his words will resonate with you.
Enjoy.

On a filmic note :::
I just watched Nuri Bilge Ceylan’s Distant - apparently available in its entirety on youtube though i don’t recommend you watch it this way.
The cinematography is mesmerizing (and youtube degrades it).
In watching, in its meditative pace, the viewer feels sucked in - enters another’s life completely.

But…
What I was really inspired by this week was a film by Srdjan Keca, whom I met at the Berlinale Talent Campus last month. His A Letter To Dad is premiering at Full Frame next month. Brilliantly and sensitively crafted… transformative.

Catch it, somewhere.

Mar 26
Toward the end of last year ::: http://vimeo.com/39156555
My partner in crime Martyna and I filmed, quite a few actions that extended form the Occupy Wall Street movement, namely the student protests and teach-ins.One of these was organized by Students United For A Free Cuny in which Louis Reyes Rivera, (poet, lecturer, activist, educator, freedom fighter among other things) passed on some of his wisdom from the 1969 Student Take Over of City College to a new generation of young activists.
Rivera has since passed, earlier this month…this film is dedicated to his memory.Perhaps his words will resonate with you.Enjoy.
On a filmic note :::I just watched Nuri Bilge Ceylan’s Distant - apparently available in its entirety on youtube though i don’t recommend you watch it this way.The cinematography is mesmerizing (and youtube degrades it).In watching, in its meditative pace, the viewer feels sucked in - enters another’s life completely.
But…What I was really inspired by this week was a film by Srdjan Keca, whom I met at the Berlinale Talent Campus last month. His A Letter To Dad is premiering at Full Frame next month. Brilliantly and sensitively crafted… transformative.
Catch it, somewhere.

On Martin Luther King’s Day, a special treat… http://vimeo.com/35467813

With the elections at hand…and many people dreading the Republican wrath, I was reminded of Angela Davis’ talk at OWS last year (it’s already last year!). Here’s a little something on the Third Party System and OWS.

I’ll also include here a quote I enjoyed from the”Pedagogy Of The Oppressed”:

"The oppressed, having internalized the image of the oppressor and adopted his guidelines, are fearful of freedom. Freedom would require them to eject this image and replace it with autonomy and responsibility. Freedom is acquired by conquest, not by gift. It must be pursued constantly and responsibly. Freedom is not an ideal located outside of man; nor is it an idea which becomes myth. It is rather the indispensable condition for the quest for human completion."
Paulo Freire

On the film from, I just recently watched “I Am Cuba/Soy Cuba" a 1964 film by Mikhail Kalatozov… a brilliant resistance film but also visually the most compelling camera work and the increadible tracking shots, check out this funeral scene. It’s a beauty.

A few months ago, Scott Macaulay of Filmmaker Magazine recommended another must see, Gary Tarn's “Black Sun”. A brilliantly crafted documentary that’s a little reminiscent of Sans Soleil, not only is it artfully executed, Hugues de Montalembert (the storyteller) takes us into realms we forget to explore.

Jan 16
On Martin Luther King’s Day, a special treat… http://vimeo.com/35467813
With the elections at hand…and many people dreading the Republican wrath, I was reminded of Angela Davis’ talk at OWS last year (it’s already last year!). Here’s a little something on the Third Party System and OWS.
I’ll also include here a quote I enjoyed from the”Pedagogy Of The Oppressed”:
"The oppressed, having internalized the image of the oppressor and adopted his guidelines, are fearful of freedom. Freedom would require them to eject this image and replace it with autonomy and responsibility. Freedom is acquired by conquest, not by gift. It must be pursued constantly and responsibly. Freedom is not an ideal located outside of man; nor is it an idea which becomes myth. It is rather the indispensable condition for the quest for human completion."- Paulo Freire
On the film from, I just recently watched “I Am Cuba/Soy Cuba" a 1964 film by Mikhail Kalatozov… a brilliant resistance film but also visually the most compelling camera work and the increadible tracking shots, check out this funeral scene. It’s a beauty.
A few months ago, Scott Macaulay of Filmmaker Magazine recommended another must see, Gary Tarn's “Black Sun”. A brilliantly crafted documentary that’s a little reminiscent of Sans Soleil, not only is it artfully executed, Hugues de Montalembert (the storyteller) takes us into realms we forget to explore.

November was a dance month,

WATCH ::: http://vimeo.com/34694148

I saw a beautiful performance piece put together by some friends :::
A brilliant composer (and my collaborator) Alexander Berne whose music transforms, Karolien Soete a talented artist and the Stefanie Nelson Dance Group.
I was touched…here’s a little extract of it.

On the topic of dance…PINA in 3D! Yes!
Probably the first film I really enjoyed watching in 3D. Though I found some of the cuts between interviews and performances a bit awkward, the film is beautiful.
Pina's quotes are inspiring as is Wenders' imaginative direction…and the dancers leave you breathless. To paraphrase Pina's words, “sometimes you're left speechless, when words fail to evoke…then there is dance.” Indeed, watching it I remembered how to feel.

I also recently saw Bombay Beach by Alma Har’el.
Though beautifully shot, dreamy and poetic, the film left no mark. I was struggling to find any transformative purpose to the film.
It portrays impoverished America, romanticizes it and brings it to a theater near you, to watch and feel better about not being an inhabitant of Bombay Beach. The protagonist (a tough old man) opens the film to offer some “wise” insights into life but also happens to be racist.
Is there something romantic about poverty? I saw some pretty pictures but learnt nothing new.

Read "What’s Wrong With The Liberal Documentary" by Jill Godmilow to get a better sense of what we should strive for in documentary films.

Dec 26
November was a dance month,
WATCH ::: http://vimeo.com/34694148
I saw a beautiful performance piece put together by some friends :::A brilliant composer (and my collaborator) Alexander Berne whose music transforms, Karolien Soete a talented artist and the Stefanie Nelson Dance Group.I was touched…here’s a little extract of it.
On the topic of dance…PINA in 3D! Yes!Probably the first film I really enjoyed watching in 3D. Though I found some of the cuts between interviews and performances a bit awkward, the film is beautiful.Pina's quotes are inspiring as is Wenders' imaginative direction…and the dancers leave you breathless. To paraphrase Pina's words, “sometimes you're left speechless, when words fail to evoke…then there is dance.” Indeed, watching it I remembered how to feel.
I also recently saw Bombay Beach by Alma Har’el.Though beautifully shot, dreamy and poetic, the film left no mark. I was struggling to find any transformative purpose to the film.It portrays impoverished America, romanticizes it and brings it to a theater near you, to watch and feel better about not being an inhabitant of Bombay Beach. The protagonist (a tough old man) opens the film to offer some “wise” insights into life but also happens to be racist.Is there something romantic about poverty? I saw some pretty pictures but learnt nothing new.
Read "What’s Wrong With The Liberal Documentary" by Jill Godmilow to get a better sense of what we should strive for in documentary films.

On a lighter note,

WATCH ::: http://vimeo.com/32553320

Every summer steel drum orchestras gather in panyards across Brooklyn to gear up for the annual Steel Band Panorama Competition. The Despers come together every night throughout the summer. The sound is captivating, indeed trance-like. We, my brilliant film partner Sarah and I, left each time elevated. I was in cinematic heaven.

And speaking of cinematic heaven, this past week I checked out a few “ethnographic” oldies.
Film Forum ran a retrospective of Robert Gardner’s films and Margaret Mead Film Festival did the same for Jean Rouch.

I checked out Gardner’s Dead Birds and Forest Of Bliss. Both are cinematically brilliant, absolutely gorgeous. He carefully chooses his compositions, constructs his shots mysteriously, slowly revealing. He pays attention to details such as plants, insects and the silence of the atmosphere. The viewer enters the film, engrossed. He also uses the voice of god type of narration to inform the viewer about the Dani culture and the two main characters. He goes so far to tell us their thoughts, disappointments and exaggerations and I can’t help but wonder how he has come up with them?
It’s staged to a point (so are Flaherty and Rouch’s films) and somewhat problematic in the sense of exotic othering (he doesn’t mention his intent to the Dani people) but I find myself unable to dismiss its value. It’s fascinating. Here’s a tough and interesting critique of the film by Jay Ruby.

Forest of Bliss is equally as beautiful, though here Gardner looses his voiceover and also refrains from subtitles. We watch and interpret for ourselves. The films circles, repeating images and enclosing the viewer in what seems a small radius on the Ganges…death is theme but so is life…and life is struggle in this film.

Jean Rouch’s Jaguar is funny, entertaining and a sort of docu-fiction.
In constructing the story, he stages and directs the actions of his characters. He also uses his friends in the films and as crew members.
After some criticisms of his early films, he here gives the voice back to the people filmed by having them watch themselves and come up with their own narration to the film. They themselves comment on life in Accra, Africa, culture etc. (they make fun of different tribes and their nudity and gestures)..the exchanges are humorous and at times tiring, there is no natural sound of the filmed scenes and so the viewer is not really entering their world.

The people of colonized countries are or perhaps were somewhat subservient toward the colonizers and I wonder to what extent the narration is constructed to “please” Rouch. There is also a part in the film where one of the characters, upon arriving to Accra finds himself in a managerial position and treats his workers unkindly - this part immediately linked me back to a clip of Rouch I had watched prior to Jaguar.

Not an easy task, documenting, representing, respecting the theme, people and the message.
Let’s keep questioning ourselves, reflecting back to ourselves.

And in closing, here are the two men together, The Screening Room chat between Gardner and Rouch

Nov 21
On a lighter note,
WATCH ::: http://vimeo.com/32553320
Every summer steel drum orchestras gather in panyards across Brooklyn to gear up for the annual Steel Band Panorama Competition. The Despers come together every night throughout the summer. The sound is captivating, indeed trance-like. We, my brilliant film partner Sarah and I, left each time elevated. I was in cinematic heaven.
And speaking of cinematic heaven, this past week I checked out a few “ethnographic” oldies.Film Forum ran a retrospective of Robert Gardner’s films and Margaret Mead Film Festival did the same for Jean Rouch.
I checked out Gardner’s Dead Birds and Forest Of Bliss. Both are cinematically brilliant, absolutely gorgeous. He carefully chooses his compositions, constructs his shots mysteriously, slowly revealing. He pays attention to details such as plants, insects and the silence of the atmosphere. The viewer enters the film, engrossed. He also uses the voice of god type of narration to inform the viewer about the Dani culture and the two main characters. He goes so far to tell us their thoughts, disappointments and exaggerations and I can’t help but wonder how he has come up with them?It’s staged to a point (so are Flaherty and Rouch’s films) and somewhat problematic in the sense of exotic othering (he doesn’t mention his intent to the Dani people) but I find myself unable to dismiss its value. It’s fascinating. Here’s a tough and interesting critique of the film by Jay Ruby.
Forest of Bliss is equally as beautiful, though here Gardner looses his voiceover and also refrains from subtitles. We watch and interpret for ourselves. The films circles, repeating images and enclosing the viewer in what seems a small radius on the Ganges…death is theme but so is life…and life is struggle in this film.
Jean Rouch’s Jaguar is funny, entertaining and a sort of docu-fiction.In constructing the story, he stages and directs the actions of his characters. He also uses his friends in the films and as crew members.After some criticisms of his early films, he here gives the voice back to the people filmed by having them watch themselves and come up with their own narration to the film. They themselves comment on life in Accra, Africa, culture etc. (they make fun of different tribes and their nudity and gestures)..the exchanges are humorous and at times tiring, there is no natural sound of the filmed scenes and so the viewer is not really entering their world.
The people of colonized countries are or perhaps were somewhat subservient toward the colonizers and I wonder to what extent the narration is constructed to “please” Rouch. There is also a part in the film where one of the characters, upon arriving to Accra finds himself in a managerial position and treats his workers unkindly - this part immediately linked me back to a clip of Rouch I had watched prior to Jaguar.
Not an easy task, documenting, representing, respecting the theme, people and the message.Let’s keep questioning ourselves, reflecting back to ourselves.
And in closing, here are the two men together, The Screening Room chat between Gardner and Rouch

"In 1969, a group of black and Puerto Rican students occupied City College demanding the integration of CUNY, which at the time had an overwhelmingly white student body. The occupation spread to other CUNY campuses, forcing the Board of Trustees to implement a ground-breaking new admissions policy."

http://vimeo.com/31285186

Such occupations also occurred in the 1980s and 2000s.
It’s that time again.

As Graduate Film students at Hunter College in New York, we’re very excited to see how the spreading Occupy Wall Street movement is giving new momentum to the militant protest culture of Cuny (City University, NYC).

We filmed the second General Assembly at Hunter College, and the first “Occupy Cuny” teach-in at Washington Square Park on October 21st, 2011. During the last weeks, we learned how quickly small protest gatherings can turn into new social movements. This is a document about the struggle of students and adjunct faculty at Cuny. This local struggle is part of an international student movement against neoliberal dictatorship.
This is only the beginning. The time for action is now.

Find out how to support, participate, take action:
cunygeneralassembly.wordpress.com
studentsunitedforafreecuny.wordpress.com
resistandmultiply.wordpress.com (at Hunter College)
cunyadjunctproject.org
nycga.net (Occupy Wall Street)
occupywallst.org

Being in the midst of events, as they are manifesting is exciting. I was recently reminded of some brilliant films like Harlan County and Primary,
there is something very special in capturing moments that are of historical significance, even more so participating in them.

And the latest inspiration is Jean Rouch and Edgar Morin's experiment Chronique d’un été (Chronicle of A Summer). One of first introductions to Cinéma Vérité, it illustrates the problems of film reality, how it’s depicted, portrayed and relayed to the audience. The film poses questions “Are you happy?” and “How do you live?” in an attempt to comment on the state of affairs in 1960 Paris. What I was most impressed by is the concept itself; the idea of approaching a theme/situation/topic from the point of view of social engagement and conversation, a study, a research in real time “authenticity of life as it is lived”. The film’s outcome was not what the parties had anticipated but rather it was a revelation of the many layers of representation…the subjects assuming a role on the camera, their awareness of assuming the role, the creation of a “socio-drama to permit each person to play out his life role before the camera.”

(read : “Chronicle of a Film,” by Edgar Morin in Ciné-Ethnography: Jean Rouch ed. by Steven Feld)

Oct 26
"In 1969, a group of black and Puerto Rican students occupied City College demanding the integration of CUNY, which at the time had an overwhelmingly white student body. The occupation spread to other CUNY campuses, forcing the Board of Trustees to implement a ground-breaking new admissions policy."
http://vimeo.com/31285186
Such occupations also occurred in the 1980s and 2000s.It’s that time again.
As Graduate Film students at Hunter College in New York, we’re very excited to see how the spreading Occupy Wall Street movement is giving new momentum to the militant protest culture of Cuny (City University, NYC).
We filmed the second General Assembly at Hunter College, and the first “Occupy Cuny” teach-in at Washington Square Park on October 21st, 2011. During the last weeks, we learned how quickly small protest gatherings can turn into new social movements. This is a document about the struggle of students and adjunct faculty at Cuny. This local struggle is part of an international student movement against neoliberal dictatorship.This is only the beginning. The time for action is now.
Find out how to support, participate, take action:cunygeneralassembly.wordpress.comstudentsunitedforafreecuny.wordpress.comresistandmultiply.wordpress.com (at Hunter College)cunyadjunctproject.orgnycga.net (Occupy Wall Street)occupywallst.org
Being in the midst of events, as they are manifesting is exciting. I was recently reminded of some brilliant films like Harlan County and Primary,there is something very special in capturing moments that are of historical significance, even more so participating in them.
And the latest inspiration is Jean Rouch and Edgar Morin's experiment Chronique d’un été (Chronicle of A Summer). One of first introductions to Cinéma Vérité, it illustrates the problems of film reality, how it’s depicted, portrayed and relayed to the audience. The film poses questions “Are you happy?” and “How do you live?” in an attempt to comment on the state of affairs in 1960 Paris. What I was most impressed by is the concept itself; the idea of approaching a theme/situation/topic from the point of view of social engagement and conversation, a study, a research in real time “authenticity of life as it is lived”. The film’s outcome was not what the parties had anticipated but rather it was a revelation of the many layers of representation…the subjects assuming a role on the camera, their awareness of assuming the role, the creation of a “socio-drama to permit each person to play out his life role before the camera.”
(read : “Chronicle of a Film,” by Edgar Morin in Ciné-Ethnography: Jean Rouch ed. by Steven Feld)

We the people have found our voice.
(NYC General Assembly, September 27, 2011)

WATCH ::: http://vimeo.com/30241489

If it’s our sharing that makes us powerful, why return to normal?
This life is more worth living than the one we left behind.
(Leaflet, Solidarity March with Occupy Wall Street, October 5, 2011)

How do our voices of dissent encounter each other?
Do we really want to merge our raging cacophony into a unified political agenda?
What if the voice of the people is always in a mode of becoming?
Welcome to the hidden track of Occupy Wall Street:
We are discovering new ways in which our desires can resonate together.
This space is our sonogram of potential.

Find the latest news, learn how to participate, and support:
occupywallst.org

I was reading a fantastic article on Alain Resnais’s Night and Fog "Documenting the Ineffable" by Sandy Flitterman-Lewis…i very much recommend it…the closing paragraph included a quote from theologian Abraham Joshua Heschel:::

"be sure that every little deed counts, that very word has power, and that we can, everyone, do our share to redeem the world…build a life as if it was a work of art…and remember that life is a celebration.”

…beautiful.

Oct 08
We the people have found our voice.(NYC General Assembly, September 27, 2011)
WATCH ::: http://vimeo.com/30241489
If it’s our sharing that makes us powerful, why return to normal?This life is more worth living than the one we left behind.(Leaflet, Solidarity March with Occupy Wall Street, October 5, 2011)
How do our voices of dissent encounter each other?Do we really want to merge our raging cacophony into a unified political agenda?What if the voice of the people is always in a mode of becoming?Welcome to the hidden track of Occupy Wall Street:We are discovering new ways in which our desires can resonate together.This space is our sonogram of potential.
Find the latest news, learn how to participate, and support:occupywallst.org
I was reading a fantastic article on Alain Resnais’s Night and Fog "Documenting the Ineffable" by Sandy Flitterman-Lewis…i very much recommend it…the closing paragraph included a quote from theologian Abraham Joshua Heschel:::
"be sure that every little deed counts, that very word has power, and that we can, everyone, do our share to redeem the world…build a life as if it was a work of art…and remember that life is a celebration.”
…beautiful.

Sometime this winter ::: http://vimeo.com/24860101

It’s been a crazy busy time, writing my first script, working on a feature doc, writing papers and generally working really hard.  Now, it’s 100 degrees, things have slowed down and I get to be creative with my short clips again.

I attended my friend Aneish’s grandma’s 80th birthday party. Tiny had a huge party at Maestro’s in the Bronx. There were about 200 people, who flew over from Jamaica, London and all over the country. Brilliant celebration with a huge family. It was beautiful and I was in cinematic heaven. Enjoy the sounds of Jamaica.

I recently watched Carlos Reygadas' Battle In Heaven (Carlos happens to be one of my favorite directors), and though it didn’t touch me as much as Silent Light or Japon, like all his films it’s a visual, meditative masterpiece…each shot is daring and perfect…everything exists in what’s not being said and what’s not being shown.

I wrote a not so short analysis of it, check it out if you have some reading time.

More, soon.

May 30
Sometime this winter ::: http://vimeo.com/24860101
It’s been a crazy busy time, writing my first script, working on a feature doc, writing papers and generally working really hard.  Now, it’s 100 degrees, things have slowed down and I get to be creative with my short clips again.
I attended my friend Aneish’s grandma’s 80th birthday party. Tiny had a huge party at Maestro’s in the Bronx. There were about 200 people, who flew over from Jamaica, London and all over the country. Brilliant celebration with a huge family. It was beautiful and I was in cinematic heaven. Enjoy the sounds of Jamaica.
I recently watched Carlos Reygadas' Battle In Heaven (Carlos happens to be one of my favorite directors), and though it didn’t touch me as much as Silent Light or Japon, like all his films it’s a visual, meditative masterpiece…each shot is daring and perfect…everything exists in what’s not being said and what’s not being shown.
I wrote a not so short analysis of it, check it out if you have some reading time.
More, soon.

So, on Friday…my partner in crime Martyna Starosta and I went to Time Square last week to rebirth Jenny Holzer’s 1986 installation “Protect Me From What I Want”. We attacked the masses.

Here’s what they had to offer ::: http://vimeo.com/22868550

On a different note, Nelson is screening at Scene:Brooklyn on May 12th, which lead to this nice article on the film and ivaasks from Bed-Stuy Patch.

If you get a chance check out Cinema Komunisto at the Tribeca Film Festival. It’s a cleverly crafted film that documents the history of Yugoslavia, communism and Tito though careful analysis of the history of Yugoslavian film. An interesting concept told with a great emotional thread. I was brought to tears a few times - but being Yugoslavian and nostalgic I am an easy target.

I was disappointed that the film omitted referencing the Black Wave (an interesting article on Zilnik and the Black Wave era) and some of the brilliant Yugoslavian films - the result of which makes the viewer leave the cinema feeling that most films from this country were bad. Hopefully thats not what the audience took away from it.

Anyway, catch it if you can. 

(Sidenote: At NAB - I was supper excited to check out the Sony Cameras. I’m in love with the Sony F3 and the FS100 is an affordable version of it (not without issues) but still lovely.  Of course, everyone is talking about the FCP X - I can’t wait for automatic sound syncing, color matching with a click and subsampling options).

Apr 18
So, on Friday…my partner in crime Martyna Starosta and I went to Time Square last week to rebirth Jenny Holzer’s 1986 installation “Protect Me From What I Want”. We attacked the masses.
Here’s what they had to offer ::: http://vimeo.com/22868550
On a different note, Nelson is screening at Scene:Brooklyn on May 12th, which lead to this nice article on the film and ivaasks from Bed-Stuy Patch.
If you get a chance check out Cinema Komunisto at the Tribeca Film Festival. It’s a cleverly crafted film that documents the history of Yugoslavia, communism and Tito though careful analysis of the history of Yugoslavian film. An interesting concept told with a great emotional thread. I was brought to tears a few times - but being Yugoslavian and nostalgic I am an easy target.
I was disappointed that the film omitted referencing the Black Wave (an interesting article on Zilnik and the Black Wave era) and some of the brilliant Yugoslavian films - the result of which makes the viewer leave the cinema feeling that most films from this country were bad. Hopefully thats not what the audience took away from it.
Anyway, catch it if you can. 
(Sidenote: At NAB - I was supper excited to check out the Sony Cameras. I’m in love with the Sony F3 and the FS100 is an affordable version of it (not without issues) but still lovely.  Of course, everyone is talking about the FCP X - I can’t wait for automatic sound syncing, color matching with a click and subsampling options).

This week I enrolled in the 5 day International Documentary Challenge with a group of school friends.

The idea was to make a short doc in 5 days, the theme and genre of which we find out on the first day of the challenge.  Easy enough!  The theme was Movement, the genre a character study.  We decided to document Matt Lewis a firm believer of Harold Camping’s theory that May 21st is Judgement Day.

Though I can’t post the video online just yet…it will be made available once the judging is over.  Most challenging of the challenge is orienting oneself to the group dynamic and adapting ideas to the the ideas of the team…not so easy but a great learning experience.

In the mean time, two fantastic movies I saw recently. A 1964 film by Hiroshi Teshigahara, and my new personal favorite Woman In The Dunes.  Brilliant. Intense. With music by Tôru Takemitsu…Film Forum recently had a retrospective of his work (music composed for film).

And Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s recent film Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives. So beautiful crafted in its simplicity and abstraction. Fascinating. Film Screening tomorrow and More clips soon.

Mar 07
This week I enrolled in the 5 day International Documentary Challenge with a group of school friends.
The idea was to make a short doc in 5 days, the theme and genre of which we find out on the first day of the challenge.  Easy enough!  The theme was Movement, the genre a character study.  We decided to document Matt Lewis a firm believer of Harold Camping’s theory that May 21st is Judgement Day.
Though I can’t post the video online just yet…it will be made available once the judging is over.  Most challenging of the challenge is orienting oneself to the group dynamic and adapting ideas to the the ideas of the team…not so easy but a great learning experience.
In the mean time, two fantastic movies I saw recently. A 1964 film by Hiroshi Teshigahara, and my new personal favorite Woman In The Dunes.  Brilliant. Intense. With music by Tôru Takemitsu…Film Forum recently had a retrospective of his work (music composed for film).
And Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s recent film Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives. So beautiful crafted in its simplicity and abstraction. Fascinating. Film Screening tomorrow and More clips soon.

This a project i’ve been working on since last summer. Spent my days hanging out with the Kite Flyers of Brooklyn after being introduced by my friend Giovanni.

This is a short documentary on the Pakistani tradition of Kite Battling,  as a sport, it’s quite meditative and beautiful.

WATCH ::: https://vimeo.com/16835171

First place it’s showing is at the Screen Loud Film Festival. More good news in May, Following Crickets screens in Austria at E.V.A. Experimental Video Art Festival.

Feb 14
This a project i’ve been working on since last summer. Spent my days hanging out with the Kite Flyers of Brooklyn after being introduced by my friend Giovanni.
This is a short documentary on the Pakistani tradition of Kite Battling,  as a sport, it’s quite meditative and beautiful.
WATCH ::: https://vimeo.com/16835171
First place it’s showing is at the Screen Loud Film Festival. More good news in May, Following Crickets screens in Austria at E.V.A. Experimental Video Art Festival.

So after what felt like a marathon 4 months…I’m taking a little breather…on an island in the sun, Cyprus. (70 degrees! yes…)

I’ll be filming here and will be back with some new island flavor soon. In the meantime, maybe you’ll enjoy this audio project on Identity : I-Identity

Mostly, it incorporates recordings of my grandma reciting a recipe, momma (the accented english), dad, sister, close friends and myself in an attempt to explore:

What is it that gives us our identity? 

What forms our particular identifications with things?

How strong are our roots in the identification process?

And what happens when those roots are disrupted?

How does our family and environment shape our identity?

Is Identity necessary?

Who am I when I’m still - silent?

Enjoy.

Dec 19

On a Thursday night i ventured off to Hunts Point in the Bronx to write a story for Hunts Point Express on the Urban Word program at The Point

I was awed and inspired, maybe you’ll be too ::: http://vimeo.com/17486259

check out 13 year old activist, poet, spoken word mc Nene Ali

It’s been a marathon month, or three months…with 4 projects due in one week time is limited but…i did discover a new favorite blog with lots of brilliant film discussion, doc ideas, inspiring projects etc, check it out collabdocs .

Oh and p.s. I did switch to a 5D, from 7D…more on that next week.

Dec 05
On a Thursday night i ventured off to Hunts Point in the Bronx to write a story for Hunts Point Express on the Urban Word program at The Point…
I was awed and inspired, maybe you’ll be too ::: http://vimeo.com/17486259
check out 13 year old activist, poet, spoken word mc Nene Ali. 
It’s been a marathon month, or three months…with 4 projects due in one week time is limited but…i did discover a new favorite blog with lots of brilliant film discussion, doc ideas, inspiring projects etc, check it out collabdocs .
Oh and p.s. I did switch to a 5D, from 7D…more on that next week.

On my way to and from Hunter (College), I sometimes stop to reinforce my peanut addiction…one of those days I ran into Nelson whose cash machine is decorated with photos from Vietnam…

of course, I had to ask…here’s Nelson’s story ::: http://vimeo.com/17072307

Also, i bought this new Zeiss lens which allows for this brilliant image…BUT…major vignetting when closing to anywhere near f3…big issue (you can see some blackness in the close ups)…and i thought i was getting a good deal…so, stay away from Zebra Pancolar 1.8/50 50mm Zeiss Jena DDR.

And lastly, check out this cool interactive film by Chris Milk

Nov 21
On my way to and from Hunter (College), I sometimes stop to reinforce my peanut addiction…one of those days I ran into Nelson whose cash machine is decorated with photos from Vietnam…
of course, I had to ask…here’s Nelson’s story ::: http://vimeo.com/17072307
Also, i bought this new Zeiss lens which allows for this brilliant image…BUT…major vignetting when closing to anywhere near f3…big issue (you can see some blackness in the close ups)…and i thought i was getting a good deal…so, stay away from Zebra Pancolar 1.8/50 50mm Zeiss Jena DDR.
And lastly, check out this cool interactive film by Chris Milk
June’s Steel Drum Orchestras ::: http://vimeo.com/45010190
This is very quick and dirty.Last summer my partner in crime Sarah Hagey and I made a short film on Despers USA,a full steel drum orchestra from Trinidad. Throughout the summer, various bands gatherthroughout brooklyn to practice and prepare for the annual competition in September.Last year’s winners were Adlib, this is a small excerpt of their performance that Sarah and Ihad a pleasure of checking out. The Despers put on a night that featured the best of the bestand asked us to film the event. We haven’t yet had a chance to edit the entire thing.But here’s a little taste, I was elevated by Adlib and perhaps you will be too.
Our short film, Despers USA is screening at Rooftop films on June 29th, and theDespers are performing!
Be sure to check it out - they transport you into a trance!
Otherwise, I’m currently in Cyprus working on my first feature films and so the posts are lessfrequent but are nevertheless coming…I will be posting some interesting stuff over the summer.
In the meantime,One of my new all time favorite films 5 Broken Cameras.Absolutely ingenius, done jointly by a Palestinian and an Israeli director.It’s conveys the problems as you have never seen it before, cleverly and emotionally structured.Brilliant editing too.
Find it!
June’s Steel Drum Orchestras ::: http://vimeo.com/45010190
This is very quick and dirty.Last summer my partner in crime Sarah Hagey and I made a short film on Despers USA,a full steel drum orchestra from Trinidad. Throughout the summer, various bands gatherthroughout brooklyn to practice and prepare for the annual competition in September.Last year’s winners were Adlib, this is a small excerpt of their performance that Sarah and Ihad a pleasure of checking out. The Despers put on a night that featured the best of the bestand asked us to film the event. We haven’t yet had a chance to edit the entire thing.But here’s a little taste, I was elevated by Adlib and perhaps you will be too.
Our short film, Despers USA is screening at Rooftop films on June 29th, and theDespers are performing!
Be sure to check it out - they transport you into a trance!
Otherwise, I’m currently in Cyprus working on my first feature films and so the posts are lessfrequent but are nevertheless coming…I will be posting some interesting stuff over the summer.
In the meantime,One of my new all time favorite films 5 Broken Cameras.Absolutely ingenius, done jointly by a Palestinian and an Israeli director.It’s conveys the problems as you have never seen it before, cleverly and emotionally structured.Brilliant editing too.
Find it!

June’s Steel Drum Orchestras ::: http://vimeo.com/45010190

This is very quick and dirty.
Last summer my partner in crime Sarah Hagey and I made a short film on Despers USA,
a full steel drum orchestra from Trinidad. Throughout the summer, various bands gather
throughout brooklyn to practice and prepare for the annual competition in September.
Last year’s winners were Adlib, this is a small excerpt of their performance that Sarah and I
had a pleasure of checking out. The Despers put on a night that featured the best of the best
and asked us to film the event. We haven’t yet had a chance to edit the entire thing.
But here’s a little taste, I was elevated by Adlib and perhaps you will be too.

Our short film, Despers USA is screening at Rooftop films on June 29th, and the
Despers are performing!

Be sure to check it out - they transport you into a trance!

Otherwise, I’m currently in Cyprus working on my first feature films and so the posts are less
frequent but are nevertheless coming…I will be posting some interesting stuff over the summer.


In the meantime,
One of my new all time favorite films 5 Broken Cameras.
Absolutely ingenius, done jointly by a Palestinian and an Israeli director.
It’s conveys the problems as you have never seen it before, cleverly and emotionally structured.
Brilliant editing too.

Find it!

Toward the end of last year ::: http://vimeo.com/39156555
My partner in crime Martyna and I filmed, quite a few actions that extended form the Occupy Wall Street movement, namely the student protests and teach-ins.One of these was organized by Students United For A Free Cuny in which Louis Reyes Rivera, (poet, lecturer, activist, educator, freedom fighter among other things) passed on some of his wisdom from the 1969 Student Take Over of City College to a new generation of young activists.
Rivera has since passed, earlier this month…this film is dedicated to his memory.Perhaps his words will resonate with you.Enjoy.
On a filmic note :::I just watched Nuri Bilge Ceylan’s Distant - apparently available in its entirety on youtube though i don’t recommend you watch it this way.The cinematography is mesmerizing (and youtube degrades it).In watching, in its meditative pace, the viewer feels sucked in - enters another’s life completely.
But…What I was really inspired by this week was a film by Srdjan Keca, whom I met at the Berlinale Talent Campus last month. His A Letter To Dad is premiering at Full Frame next month. Brilliantly and sensitively crafted… transformative.
Catch it, somewhere.
Toward the end of last year ::: http://vimeo.com/39156555
My partner in crime Martyna and I filmed, quite a few actions that extended form the Occupy Wall Street movement, namely the student protests and teach-ins.One of these was organized by Students United For A Free Cuny in which Louis Reyes Rivera, (poet, lecturer, activist, educator, freedom fighter among other things) passed on some of his wisdom from the 1969 Student Take Over of City College to a new generation of young activists.
Rivera has since passed, earlier this month…this film is dedicated to his memory.Perhaps his words will resonate with you.Enjoy.
On a filmic note :::I just watched Nuri Bilge Ceylan’s Distant - apparently available in its entirety on youtube though i don’t recommend you watch it this way.The cinematography is mesmerizing (and youtube degrades it).In watching, in its meditative pace, the viewer feels sucked in - enters another’s life completely.
But…What I was really inspired by this week was a film by Srdjan Keca, whom I met at the Berlinale Talent Campus last month. His A Letter To Dad is premiering at Full Frame next month. Brilliantly and sensitively crafted… transformative.
Catch it, somewhere.

Toward the end of last year ::: http://vimeo.com/39156555

My partner in crime Martyna and I filmed, quite a few actions that extended form the Occupy Wall Street movement, namely the student protests and teach-ins.
One of these was organized by Students United For A Free Cuny in which Louis Reyes Rivera, (poet, lecturer, activist, educator, freedom fighter among other things) passed on some of his wisdom from the 1969 Student Take Over of City College to a new generation of young activists.

Rivera has since passed, earlier this month…this film is dedicated to his memory.
Perhaps his words will resonate with you.
Enjoy.

On a filmic note :::
I just watched Nuri Bilge Ceylan’s Distant - apparently available in its entirety on youtube though i don’t recommend you watch it this way.
The cinematography is mesmerizing (and youtube degrades it).
In watching, in its meditative pace, the viewer feels sucked in - enters another’s life completely.

But…
What I was really inspired by this week was a film by Srdjan Keca, whom I met at the Berlinale Talent Campus last month. His A Letter To Dad is premiering at Full Frame next month. Brilliantly and sensitively crafted… transformative.

Catch it, somewhere.

On Martin Luther King’s Day, a special treat… http://vimeo.com/35467813
With the elections at hand…and many people dreading the Republican wrath, I was reminded of Angela Davis’ talk at OWS last year (it’s already last year!). Here’s a little something on the Third Party System and OWS.
I’ll also include here a quote I enjoyed from the”Pedagogy Of The Oppressed”:
"The oppressed, having internalized the image of the oppressor and adopted his guidelines, are fearful of freedom. Freedom would require them to eject this image and replace it with autonomy and responsibility. Freedom is acquired by conquest, not by gift. It must be pursued constantly and responsibly. Freedom is not an ideal located outside of man; nor is it an idea which becomes myth. It is rather the indispensable condition for the quest for human completion."- Paulo Freire
On the film from, I just recently watched “I Am Cuba/Soy Cuba" a 1964 film by Mikhail Kalatozov… a brilliant resistance film but also visually the most compelling camera work and the increadible tracking shots, check out this funeral scene. It’s a beauty.
A few months ago, Scott Macaulay of Filmmaker Magazine recommended another must see, Gary Tarn's “Black Sun”. A brilliantly crafted documentary that’s a little reminiscent of Sans Soleil, not only is it artfully executed, Hugues de Montalembert (the storyteller) takes us into realms we forget to explore.
On Martin Luther King’s Day, a special treat… http://vimeo.com/35467813
With the elections at hand…and many people dreading the Republican wrath, I was reminded of Angela Davis’ talk at OWS last year (it’s already last year!). Here’s a little something on the Third Party System and OWS.
I’ll also include here a quote I enjoyed from the”Pedagogy Of The Oppressed”:
"The oppressed, having internalized the image of the oppressor and adopted his guidelines, are fearful of freedom. Freedom would require them to eject this image and replace it with autonomy and responsibility. Freedom is acquired by conquest, not by gift. It must be pursued constantly and responsibly. Freedom is not an ideal located outside of man; nor is it an idea which becomes myth. It is rather the indispensable condition for the quest for human completion."- Paulo Freire
On the film from, I just recently watched “I Am Cuba/Soy Cuba" a 1964 film by Mikhail Kalatozov… a brilliant resistance film but also visually the most compelling camera work and the increadible tracking shots, check out this funeral scene. It’s a beauty.
A few months ago, Scott Macaulay of Filmmaker Magazine recommended another must see, Gary Tarn's “Black Sun”. A brilliantly crafted documentary that’s a little reminiscent of Sans Soleil, not only is it artfully executed, Hugues de Montalembert (the storyteller) takes us into realms we forget to explore.

On Martin Luther King’s Day, a special treat… http://vimeo.com/35467813

With the elections at hand…and many people dreading the Republican wrath, I was reminded of Angela Davis’ talk at OWS last year (it’s already last year!). Here’s a little something on the Third Party System and OWS.

I’ll also include here a quote I enjoyed from the”Pedagogy Of The Oppressed”:

"The oppressed, having internalized the image of the oppressor and adopted his guidelines, are fearful of freedom. Freedom would require them to eject this image and replace it with autonomy and responsibility. Freedom is acquired by conquest, not by gift. It must be pursued constantly and responsibly. Freedom is not an ideal located outside of man; nor is it an idea which becomes myth. It is rather the indispensable condition for the quest for human completion."
Paulo Freire

On the film from, I just recently watched “I Am Cuba/Soy Cuba" a 1964 film by Mikhail Kalatozov… a brilliant resistance film but also visually the most compelling camera work and the increadible tracking shots, check out this funeral scene. It’s a beauty.

A few months ago, Scott Macaulay of Filmmaker Magazine recommended another must see, Gary Tarn's “Black Sun”. A brilliantly crafted documentary that’s a little reminiscent of Sans Soleil, not only is it artfully executed, Hugues de Montalembert (the storyteller) takes us into realms we forget to explore.

November was a dance month,
WATCH ::: http://vimeo.com/34694148
I saw a beautiful performance piece put together by some friends :::A brilliant composer (and my collaborator) Alexander Berne whose music transforms, Karolien Soete a talented artist and the Stefanie Nelson Dance Group.I was touched…here’s a little extract of it.
On the topic of dance…PINA in 3D! Yes!Probably the first film I really enjoyed watching in 3D. Though I found some of the cuts between interviews and performances a bit awkward, the film is beautiful.Pina's quotes are inspiring as is Wenders' imaginative direction…and the dancers leave you breathless. To paraphrase Pina's words, “sometimes you're left speechless, when words fail to evoke…then there is dance.” Indeed, watching it I remembered how to feel.
I also recently saw Bombay Beach by Alma Har’el.Though beautifully shot, dreamy and poetic, the film left no mark. I was struggling to find any transformative purpose to the film.It portrays impoverished America, romanticizes it and brings it to a theater near you, to watch and feel better about not being an inhabitant of Bombay Beach. The protagonist (a tough old man) opens the film to offer some “wise” insights into life but also happens to be racist.Is there something romantic about poverty? I saw some pretty pictures but learnt nothing new.
Read "What’s Wrong With The Liberal Documentary" by Jill Godmilow to get a better sense of what we should strive for in documentary films.
November was a dance month,
WATCH ::: http://vimeo.com/34694148
I saw a beautiful performance piece put together by some friends :::A brilliant composer (and my collaborator) Alexander Berne whose music transforms, Karolien Soete a talented artist and the Stefanie Nelson Dance Group.I was touched…here’s a little extract of it.
On the topic of dance…PINA in 3D! Yes!Probably the first film I really enjoyed watching in 3D. Though I found some of the cuts between interviews and performances a bit awkward, the film is beautiful.Pina's quotes are inspiring as is Wenders' imaginative direction…and the dancers leave you breathless. To paraphrase Pina's words, “sometimes you're left speechless, when words fail to evoke…then there is dance.” Indeed, watching it I remembered how to feel.
I also recently saw Bombay Beach by Alma Har’el.Though beautifully shot, dreamy and poetic, the film left no mark. I was struggling to find any transformative purpose to the film.It portrays impoverished America, romanticizes it and brings it to a theater near you, to watch and feel better about not being an inhabitant of Bombay Beach. The protagonist (a tough old man) opens the film to offer some “wise” insights into life but also happens to be racist.Is there something romantic about poverty? I saw some pretty pictures but learnt nothing new.
Read "What’s Wrong With The Liberal Documentary" by Jill Godmilow to get a better sense of what we should strive for in documentary films.

November was a dance month,

WATCH ::: http://vimeo.com/34694148

I saw a beautiful performance piece put together by some friends :::
A brilliant composer (and my collaborator) Alexander Berne whose music transforms, Karolien Soete a talented artist and the Stefanie Nelson Dance Group.
I was touched…here’s a little extract of it.

On the topic of dance…PINA in 3D! Yes!
Probably the first film I really enjoyed watching in 3D. Though I found some of the cuts between interviews and performances a bit awkward, the film is beautiful.
Pina's quotes are inspiring as is Wenders' imaginative direction…and the dancers leave you breathless. To paraphrase Pina's words, “sometimes you're left speechless, when words fail to evoke…then there is dance.” Indeed, watching it I remembered how to feel.

I also recently saw Bombay Beach by Alma Har’el.
Though beautifully shot, dreamy and poetic, the film left no mark. I was struggling to find any transformative purpose to the film.
It portrays impoverished America, romanticizes it and brings it to a theater near you, to watch and feel better about not being an inhabitant of Bombay Beach. The protagonist (a tough old man) opens the film to offer some “wise” insights into life but also happens to be racist.
Is there something romantic about poverty? I saw some pretty pictures but learnt nothing new.

Read "What’s Wrong With The Liberal Documentary" by Jill Godmilow to get a better sense of what we should strive for in documentary films.

On a lighter note,
WATCH ::: http://vimeo.com/32553320
Every summer steel drum orchestras gather in panyards across Brooklyn to gear up for the annual Steel Band Panorama Competition. The Despers come together every night throughout the summer. The sound is captivating, indeed trance-like. We, my brilliant film partner Sarah and I, left each time elevated. I was in cinematic heaven.
And speaking of cinematic heaven, this past week I checked out a few “ethnographic” oldies.Film Forum ran a retrospective of Robert Gardner’s films and Margaret Mead Film Festival did the same for Jean Rouch.
I checked out Gardner’s Dead Birds and Forest Of Bliss. Both are cinematically brilliant, absolutely gorgeous. He carefully chooses his compositions, constructs his shots mysteriously, slowly revealing. He pays attention to details such as plants, insects and the silence of the atmosphere. The viewer enters the film, engrossed. He also uses the voice of god type of narration to inform the viewer about the Dani culture and the two main characters. He goes so far to tell us their thoughts, disappointments and exaggerations and I can’t help but wonder how he has come up with them?It’s staged to a point (so are Flaherty and Rouch’s films) and somewhat problematic in the sense of exotic othering (he doesn’t mention his intent to the Dani people) but I find myself unable to dismiss its value. It’s fascinating. Here’s a tough and interesting critique of the film by Jay Ruby.
Forest of Bliss is equally as beautiful, though here Gardner looses his voiceover and also refrains from subtitles. We watch and interpret for ourselves. The films circles, repeating images and enclosing the viewer in what seems a small radius on the Ganges…death is theme but so is life…and life is struggle in this film.
Jean Rouch’s Jaguar is funny, entertaining and a sort of docu-fiction.In constructing the story, he stages and directs the actions of his characters. He also uses his friends in the films and as crew members.After some criticisms of his early films, he here gives the voice back to the people filmed by having them watch themselves and come up with their own narration to the film. They themselves comment on life in Accra, Africa, culture etc. (they make fun of different tribes and their nudity and gestures)..the exchanges are humorous and at times tiring, there is no natural sound of the filmed scenes and so the viewer is not really entering their world.
The people of colonized countries are or perhaps were somewhat subservient toward the colonizers and I wonder to what extent the narration is constructed to “please” Rouch. There is also a part in the film where one of the characters, upon arriving to Accra finds himself in a managerial position and treats his workers unkindly - this part immediately linked me back to a clip of Rouch I had watched prior to Jaguar.
Not an easy task, documenting, representing, respecting the theme, people and the message.Let’s keep questioning ourselves, reflecting back to ourselves.
And in closing, here are the two men together, The Screening Room chat between Gardner and Rouch
On a lighter note,
WATCH ::: http://vimeo.com/32553320
Every summer steel drum orchestras gather in panyards across Brooklyn to gear up for the annual Steel Band Panorama Competition. The Despers come together every night throughout the summer. The sound is captivating, indeed trance-like. We, my brilliant film partner Sarah and I, left each time elevated. I was in cinematic heaven.
And speaking of cinematic heaven, this past week I checked out a few “ethnographic” oldies.Film Forum ran a retrospective of Robert Gardner’s films and Margaret Mead Film Festival did the same for Jean Rouch.
I checked out Gardner’s Dead Birds and Forest Of Bliss. Both are cinematically brilliant, absolutely gorgeous. He carefully chooses his compositions, constructs his shots mysteriously, slowly revealing. He pays attention to details such as plants, insects and the silence of the atmosphere. The viewer enters the film, engrossed. He also uses the voice of god type of narration to inform the viewer about the Dani culture and the two main characters. He goes so far to tell us their thoughts, disappointments and exaggerations and I can’t help but wonder how he has come up with them?It’s staged to a point (so are Flaherty and Rouch’s films) and somewhat problematic in the sense of exotic othering (he doesn’t mention his intent to the Dani people) but I find myself unable to dismiss its value. It’s fascinating. Here’s a tough and interesting critique of the film by Jay Ruby.
Forest of Bliss is equally as beautiful, though here Gardner looses his voiceover and also refrains from subtitles. We watch and interpret for ourselves. The films circles, repeating images and enclosing the viewer in what seems a small radius on the Ganges…death is theme but so is life…and life is struggle in this film.
Jean Rouch’s Jaguar is funny, entertaining and a sort of docu-fiction.In constructing the story, he stages and directs the actions of his characters. He also uses his friends in the films and as crew members.After some criticisms of his early films, he here gives the voice back to the people filmed by having them watch themselves and come up with their own narration to the film. They themselves comment on life in Accra, Africa, culture etc. (they make fun of different tribes and their nudity and gestures)..the exchanges are humorous and at times tiring, there is no natural sound of the filmed scenes and so the viewer is not really entering their world.
The people of colonized countries are or perhaps were somewhat subservient toward the colonizers and I wonder to what extent the narration is constructed to “please” Rouch. There is also a part in the film where one of the characters, upon arriving to Accra finds himself in a managerial position and treats his workers unkindly - this part immediately linked me back to a clip of Rouch I had watched prior to Jaguar.
Not an easy task, documenting, representing, respecting the theme, people and the message.Let’s keep questioning ourselves, reflecting back to ourselves.
And in closing, here are the two men together, The Screening Room chat between Gardner and Rouch

On a lighter note,

WATCH ::: http://vimeo.com/32553320

Every summer steel drum orchestras gather in panyards across Brooklyn to gear up for the annual Steel Band Panorama Competition. The Despers come together every night throughout the summer. The sound is captivating, indeed trance-like. We, my brilliant film partner Sarah and I, left each time elevated. I was in cinematic heaven.

And speaking of cinematic heaven, this past week I checked out a few “ethnographic” oldies.
Film Forum ran a retrospective of Robert Gardner’s films and Margaret Mead Film Festival did the same for Jean Rouch.

I checked out Gardner’s Dead Birds and Forest Of Bliss. Both are cinematically brilliant, absolutely gorgeous. He carefully chooses his compositions, constructs his shots mysteriously, slowly revealing. He pays attention to details such as plants, insects and the silence of the atmosphere. The viewer enters the film, engrossed. He also uses the voice of god type of narration to inform the viewer about the Dani culture and the two main characters. He goes so far to tell us their thoughts, disappointments and exaggerations and I can’t help but wonder how he has come up with them?
It’s staged to a point (so are Flaherty and Rouch’s films) and somewhat problematic in the sense of exotic othering (he doesn’t mention his intent to the Dani people) but I find myself unable to dismiss its value. It’s fascinating. Here’s a tough and interesting critique of the film by Jay Ruby.

Forest of Bliss is equally as beautiful, though here Gardner looses his voiceover and also refrains from subtitles. We watch and interpret for ourselves. The films circles, repeating images and enclosing the viewer in what seems a small radius on the Ganges…death is theme but so is life…and life is struggle in this film.

Jean Rouch’s Jaguar is funny, entertaining and a sort of docu-fiction.
In constructing the story, he stages and directs the actions of his characters. He also uses his friends in the films and as crew members.
After some criticisms of his early films, he here gives the voice back to the people filmed by having them watch themselves and come up with their own narration to the film. They themselves comment on life in Accra, Africa, culture etc. (they make fun of different tribes and their nudity and gestures)..the exchanges are humorous and at times tiring, there is no natural sound of the filmed scenes and so the viewer is not really entering their world.

The people of colonized countries are or perhaps were somewhat subservient toward the colonizers and I wonder to what extent the narration is constructed to “please” Rouch. There is also a part in the film where one of the characters, upon arriving to Accra finds himself in a managerial position and treats his workers unkindly - this part immediately linked me back to a clip of Rouch I had watched prior to Jaguar.

Not an easy task, documenting, representing, respecting the theme, people and the message.
Let’s keep questioning ourselves, reflecting back to ourselves.

And in closing, here are the two men together, The Screening Room chat between Gardner and Rouch

"In 1969, a group of black and Puerto Rican students occupied City College demanding the integration of CUNY, which at the time had an overwhelmingly white student body. The occupation spread to other CUNY campuses, forcing the Board of Trustees to implement a ground-breaking new admissions policy."
http://vimeo.com/31285186
Such occupations also occurred in the 1980s and 2000s.It’s that time again.
As Graduate Film students at Hunter College in New York, we’re very excited to see how the spreading Occupy Wall Street movement is giving new momentum to the militant protest culture of Cuny (City University, NYC).
We filmed the second General Assembly at Hunter College, and the first “Occupy Cuny” teach-in at Washington Square Park on October 21st, 2011. During the last weeks, we learned how quickly small protest gatherings can turn into new social movements. This is a document about the struggle of students and adjunct faculty at Cuny. This local struggle is part of an international student movement against neoliberal dictatorship.This is only the beginning. The time for action is now.
Find out how to support, participate, take action:cunygeneralassembly.wordpress.comstudentsunitedforafreecuny.wordpress.comresistandmultiply.wordpress.com (at Hunter College)cunyadjunctproject.orgnycga.net (Occupy Wall Street)occupywallst.org
Being in the midst of events, as they are manifesting is exciting. I was recently reminded of some brilliant films like Harlan County and Primary,there is something very special in capturing moments that are of historical significance, even more so participating in them.
And the latest inspiration is Jean Rouch and Edgar Morin's experiment Chronique d’un été (Chronicle of A Summer). One of first introductions to Cinéma Vérité, it illustrates the problems of film reality, how it’s depicted, portrayed and relayed to the audience. The film poses questions “Are you happy?” and “How do you live?” in an attempt to comment on the state of affairs in 1960 Paris. What I was most impressed by is the concept itself; the idea of approaching a theme/situation/topic from the point of view of social engagement and conversation, a study, a research in real time “authenticity of life as it is lived”. The film’s outcome was not what the parties had anticipated but rather it was a revelation of the many layers of representation…the subjects assuming a role on the camera, their awareness of assuming the role, the creation of a “socio-drama to permit each person to play out his life role before the camera.”
(read : “Chronicle of a Film,” by Edgar Morin in Ciné-Ethnography: Jean Rouch ed. by Steven Feld)
"In 1969, a group of black and Puerto Rican students occupied City College demanding the integration of CUNY, which at the time had an overwhelmingly white student body. The occupation spread to other CUNY campuses, forcing the Board of Trustees to implement a ground-breaking new admissions policy."
http://vimeo.com/31285186
Such occupations also occurred in the 1980s and 2000s.It’s that time again.
As Graduate Film students at Hunter College in New York, we’re very excited to see how the spreading Occupy Wall Street movement is giving new momentum to the militant protest culture of Cuny (City University, NYC).
We filmed the second General Assembly at Hunter College, and the first “Occupy Cuny” teach-in at Washington Square Park on October 21st, 2011. During the last weeks, we learned how quickly small protest gatherings can turn into new social movements. This is a document about the struggle of students and adjunct faculty at Cuny. This local struggle is part of an international student movement against neoliberal dictatorship.This is only the beginning. The time for action is now.
Find out how to support, participate, take action:cunygeneralassembly.wordpress.comstudentsunitedforafreecuny.wordpress.comresistandmultiply.wordpress.com (at Hunter College)cunyadjunctproject.orgnycga.net (Occupy Wall Street)occupywallst.org
Being in the midst of events, as they are manifesting is exciting. I was recently reminded of some brilliant films like Harlan County and Primary,there is something very special in capturing moments that are of historical significance, even more so participating in them.
And the latest inspiration is Jean Rouch and Edgar Morin's experiment Chronique d’un été (Chronicle of A Summer). One of first introductions to Cinéma Vérité, it illustrates the problems of film reality, how it’s depicted, portrayed and relayed to the audience. The film poses questions “Are you happy?” and “How do you live?” in an attempt to comment on the state of affairs in 1960 Paris. What I was most impressed by is the concept itself; the idea of approaching a theme/situation/topic from the point of view of social engagement and conversation, a study, a research in real time “authenticity of life as it is lived”. The film’s outcome was not what the parties had anticipated but rather it was a revelation of the many layers of representation…the subjects assuming a role on the camera, their awareness of assuming the role, the creation of a “socio-drama to permit each person to play out his life role before the camera.”
(read : “Chronicle of a Film,” by Edgar Morin in Ciné-Ethnography: Jean Rouch ed. by Steven Feld)

"In 1969, a group of black and Puerto Rican students occupied City College demanding the integration of CUNY, which at the time had an overwhelmingly white student body. The occupation spread to other CUNY campuses, forcing the Board of Trustees to implement a ground-breaking new admissions policy."

http://vimeo.com/31285186

Such occupations also occurred in the 1980s and 2000s.
It’s that time again.

As Graduate Film students at Hunter College in New York, we’re very excited to see how the spreading Occupy Wall Street movement is giving new momentum to the militant protest culture of Cuny (City University, NYC).

We filmed the second General Assembly at Hunter College, and the first “Occupy Cuny” teach-in at Washington Square Park on October 21st, 2011. During the last weeks, we learned how quickly small protest gatherings can turn into new social movements. This is a document about the struggle of students and adjunct faculty at Cuny. This local struggle is part of an international student movement against neoliberal dictatorship.
This is only the beginning. The time for action is now.

Find out how to support, participate, take action:
cunygeneralassembly.wordpress.com
studentsunitedforafreecuny.wordpress.com
resistandmultiply.wordpress.com (at Hunter College)
cunyadjunctproject.org
nycga.net (Occupy Wall Street)
occupywallst.org

Being in the midst of events, as they are manifesting is exciting. I was recently reminded of some brilliant films like Harlan County and Primary,
there is something very special in capturing moments that are of historical significance, even more so participating in them.

And the latest inspiration is Jean Rouch and Edgar Morin's experiment Chronique d’un été (Chronicle of A Summer). One of first introductions to Cinéma Vérité, it illustrates the problems of film reality, how it’s depicted, portrayed and relayed to the audience. The film poses questions “Are you happy?” and “How do you live?” in an attempt to comment on the state of affairs in 1960 Paris. What I was most impressed by is the concept itself; the idea of approaching a theme/situation/topic from the point of view of social engagement and conversation, a study, a research in real time “authenticity of life as it is lived”. The film’s outcome was not what the parties had anticipated but rather it was a revelation of the many layers of representation…the subjects assuming a role on the camera, their awareness of assuming the role, the creation of a “socio-drama to permit each person to play out his life role before the camera.”

(read : “Chronicle of a Film,” by Edgar Morin in Ciné-Ethnography: Jean Rouch ed. by Steven Feld)

We the people have found our voice.(NYC General Assembly, September 27, 2011)
WATCH ::: http://vimeo.com/30241489
If it’s our sharing that makes us powerful, why return to normal?This life is more worth living than the one we left behind.(Leaflet, Solidarity March with Occupy Wall Street, October 5, 2011)
How do our voices of dissent encounter each other?Do we really want to merge our raging cacophony into a unified political agenda?What if the voice of the people is always in a mode of becoming?Welcome to the hidden track of Occupy Wall Street:We are discovering new ways in which our desires can resonate together.This space is our sonogram of potential.
Find the latest news, learn how to participate, and support:occupywallst.org
I was reading a fantastic article on Alain Resnais’s Night and Fog "Documenting the Ineffable" by Sandy Flitterman-Lewis…i very much recommend it…the closing paragraph included a quote from theologian Abraham Joshua Heschel:::
"be sure that every little deed counts, that very word has power, and that we can, everyone, do our share to redeem the world…build a life as if it was a work of art…and remember that life is a celebration.”
…beautiful.
We the people have found our voice.(NYC General Assembly, September 27, 2011)
WATCH ::: http://vimeo.com/30241489
If it’s our sharing that makes us powerful, why return to normal?This life is more worth living than the one we left behind.(Leaflet, Solidarity March with Occupy Wall Street, October 5, 2011)
How do our voices of dissent encounter each other?Do we really want to merge our raging cacophony into a unified political agenda?What if the voice of the people is always in a mode of becoming?Welcome to the hidden track of Occupy Wall Street:We are discovering new ways in which our desires can resonate together.This space is our sonogram of potential.
Find the latest news, learn how to participate, and support:occupywallst.org
I was reading a fantastic article on Alain Resnais’s Night and Fog "Documenting the Ineffable" by Sandy Flitterman-Lewis…i very much recommend it…the closing paragraph included a quote from theologian Abraham Joshua Heschel:::
"be sure that every little deed counts, that very word has power, and that we can, everyone, do our share to redeem the world…build a life as if it was a work of art…and remember that life is a celebration.”
…beautiful.

We the people have found our voice.
(NYC General Assembly, September 27, 2011)

WATCH ::: http://vimeo.com/30241489

If it’s our sharing that makes us powerful, why return to normal?
This life is more worth living than the one we left behind.
(Leaflet, Solidarity March with Occupy Wall Street, October 5, 2011)

How do our voices of dissent encounter each other?
Do we really want to merge our raging cacophony into a unified political agenda?
What if the voice of the people is always in a mode of becoming?
Welcome to the hidden track of Occupy Wall Street:
We are discovering new ways in which our desires can resonate together.
This space is our sonogram of potential.

Find the latest news, learn how to participate, and support:
occupywallst.org

I was reading a fantastic article on Alain Resnais’s Night and Fog "Documenting the Ineffable" by Sandy Flitterman-Lewis…i very much recommend it…the closing paragraph included a quote from theologian Abraham Joshua Heschel:::

"be sure that every little deed counts, that very word has power, and that we can, everyone, do our share to redeem the world…build a life as if it was a work of art…and remember that life is a celebration.”

…beautiful.

Martyna and I hit the Wall Street area on Wednesday and Thursday to document the events of the occupation.
WATCH ::: http://vimeo.com/29513113
Today is the 7th day of the occupation.The idea to occupy the financial district in New York City was inspired by recent uprisings in Spain, Greece, Egypt, and Tunisia which most of us were following online. Please forward our video to likeminded people via email, facebook, twitter - and make the voices of dissent circulate.
Find the latest news, learn how to participate and support.Most importantly, spread the word, share this.
Martyna and I hit the Wall Street area on Wednesday and Thursday to document the events of the occupation.
WATCH ::: http://vimeo.com/29513113
Today is the 7th day of the occupation.The idea to occupy the financial district in New York City was inspired by recent uprisings in Spain, Greece, Egypt, and Tunisia which most of us were following online. Please forward our video to likeminded people via email, facebook, twitter - and make the voices of dissent circulate.
Find the latest news, learn how to participate and support.Most importantly, spread the word, share this.

Martyna and I hit the Wall Street area on Wednesday and Thursday to document the events of the occupation.

WATCH ::: http://vimeo.com/29513113

Today is the 7th day of the occupation.
The idea to occupy the financial district in New York City was inspired by recent uprisings in Spain, Greece, Egypt, and Tunisia which most of us were following online. Please forward our video to likeminded people via email, facebook, twitter - and make the voices of dissent circulate.

Find the latest news, learn how to participate and support.
Most importantly, spread the word, share this.

I V A A S K S

Posted on Monday May 30th 2011 at 06:16pm. Its tags are listed below.

Sometime this winter ::: http://vimeo.com/24860101
It’s been a crazy busy time, writing my first script, working on a feature doc, writing papers and generally working really hard.  Now, it’s 100 degrees, things have slowed down and I get to be creative with my short clips again.
I attended my friend Aneish’s grandma’s 80th birthday party. Tiny had a huge party at Maestro’s in the Bronx. There were about 200 people, who flew over from Jamaica, London and all over the country. Brilliant celebration with a huge family. It was beautiful and I was in cinematic heaven. Enjoy the sounds of Jamaica.
I recently watched Carlos Reygadas' Battle In Heaven (Carlos happens to be one of my favorite directors), and though it didn’t touch me as much as Silent Light or Japon, like all his films it’s a visual, meditative masterpiece…each shot is daring and perfect…everything exists in what’s not being said and what’s not being shown.
I wrote a not so short analysis of it, check it out if you have some reading time.
More, soon.
Sometime this winter ::: http://vimeo.com/24860101
It’s been a crazy busy time, writing my first script, working on a feature doc, writing papers and generally working really hard.  Now, it’s 100 degrees, things have slowed down and I get to be creative with my short clips again.
I attended my friend Aneish’s grandma’s 80th birthday party. Tiny had a huge party at Maestro’s in the Bronx. There were about 200 people, who flew over from Jamaica, London and all over the country. Brilliant celebration with a huge family. It was beautiful and I was in cinematic heaven. Enjoy the sounds of Jamaica.
I recently watched Carlos Reygadas' Battle In Heaven (Carlos happens to be one of my favorite directors), and though it didn’t touch me as much as Silent Light or Japon, like all his films it’s a visual, meditative masterpiece…each shot is daring and perfect…everything exists in what’s not being said and what’s not being shown.
I wrote a not so short analysis of it, check it out if you have some reading time.
More, soon.

Sometime this winter ::: http://vimeo.com/24860101

It’s been a crazy busy time, writing my first script, working on a feature doc, writing papers and generally working really hard.  Now, it’s 100 degrees, things have slowed down and I get to be creative with my short clips again.

I attended my friend Aneish’s grandma’s 80th birthday party. Tiny had a huge party at Maestro’s in the Bronx. There were about 200 people, who flew over from Jamaica, London and all over the country. Brilliant celebration with a huge family. It was beautiful and I was in cinematic heaven. Enjoy the sounds of Jamaica.

I recently watched Carlos Reygadas' Battle In Heaven (Carlos happens to be one of my favorite directors), and though it didn’t touch me as much as Silent Light or Japon, like all his films it’s a visual, meditative masterpiece…each shot is daring and perfect…everything exists in what’s not being said and what’s not being shown.

I wrote a not so short analysis of it, check it out if you have some reading time.

More, soon.

So, on Friday…my partner in crime Martyna Starosta and I went to Time Square last week to rebirth Jenny Holzer’s 1986 installation “Protect Me From What I Want”. We attacked the masses.
Here’s what they had to offer ::: http://vimeo.com/22868550
On a different note, Nelson is screening at Scene:Brooklyn on May 12th, which lead to this nice article on the film and ivaasks from Bed-Stuy Patch.
If you get a chance check out Cinema Komunisto at the Tribeca Film Festival. It’s a cleverly crafted film that documents the history of Yugoslavia, communism and Tito though careful analysis of the history of Yugoslavian film. An interesting concept told with a great emotional thread. I was brought to tears a few times - but being Yugoslavian and nostalgic I am an easy target.
I was disappointed that the film omitted referencing the Black Wave (an interesting article on Zilnik and the Black Wave era) and some of the brilliant Yugoslavian films - the result of which makes the viewer leave the cinema feeling that most films from this country were bad. Hopefully thats not what the audience took away from it.
Anyway, catch it if you can. 
(Sidenote: At NAB - I was supper excited to check out the Sony Cameras. I’m in love with the Sony F3 and the FS100 is an affordable version of it (not without issues) but still lovely.  Of course, everyone is talking about the FCP X - I can’t wait for automatic sound syncing, color matching with a click and subsampling options).
So, on Friday…my partner in crime Martyna Starosta and I went to Time Square last week to rebirth Jenny Holzer’s 1986 installation “Protect Me From What I Want”. We attacked the masses.
Here’s what they had to offer ::: http://vimeo.com/22868550
On a different note, Nelson is screening at Scene:Brooklyn on May 12th, which lead to this nice article on the film and ivaasks from Bed-Stuy Patch.
If you get a chance check out Cinema Komunisto at the Tribeca Film Festival. It’s a cleverly crafted film that documents the history of Yugoslavia, communism and Tito though careful analysis of the history of Yugoslavian film. An interesting concept told with a great emotional thread. I was brought to tears a few times - but being Yugoslavian and nostalgic I am an easy target.
I was disappointed that the film omitted referencing the Black Wave (an interesting article on Zilnik and the Black Wave era) and some of the brilliant Yugoslavian films - the result of which makes the viewer leave the cinema feeling that most films from this country were bad. Hopefully thats not what the audience took away from it.
Anyway, catch it if you can. 
(Sidenote: At NAB - I was supper excited to check out the Sony Cameras. I’m in love with the Sony F3 and the FS100 is an affordable version of it (not without issues) but still lovely.  Of course, everyone is talking about the FCP X - I can’t wait for automatic sound syncing, color matching with a click and subsampling options).

So, on Friday…my partner in crime Martyna Starosta and I went to Time Square last week to rebirth Jenny Holzer’s 1986 installation “Protect Me From What I Want”. We attacked the masses.

Here’s what they had to offer ::: http://vimeo.com/22868550

On a different note, Nelson is screening at Scene:Brooklyn on May 12th, which lead to this nice article on the film and ivaasks from Bed-Stuy Patch.

If you get a chance check out Cinema Komunisto at the Tribeca Film Festival. It’s a cleverly crafted film that documents the history of Yugoslavia, communism and Tito though careful analysis of the history of Yugoslavian film. An interesting concept told with a great emotional thread. I was brought to tears a few times - but being Yugoslavian and nostalgic I am an easy target.

I was disappointed that the film omitted referencing the Black Wave (an interesting article on Zilnik and the Black Wave era) and some of the brilliant Yugoslavian films - the result of which makes the viewer leave the cinema feeling that most films from this country were bad. Hopefully thats not what the audience took away from it.

Anyway, catch it if you can. 

(Sidenote: At NAB - I was supper excited to check out the Sony Cameras. I’m in love with the Sony F3 and the FS100 is an affordable version of it (not without issues) but still lovely.  Of course, everyone is talking about the FCP X - I can’t wait for automatic sound syncing, color matching with a click and subsampling options).

This week I enrolled in the 5 day International Documentary Challenge with a group of school friends.
The idea was to make a short doc in 5 days, the theme and genre of which we find out on the first day of the challenge.  Easy enough!  The theme was Movement, the genre a character study.  We decided to document Matt Lewis a firm believer of Harold Camping’s theory that May 21st is Judgement Day.
Though I can’t post the video online just yet…it will be made available once the judging is over.  Most challenging of the challenge is orienting oneself to the group dynamic and adapting ideas to the the ideas of the team…not so easy but a great learning experience.
In the mean time, two fantastic movies I saw recently. A 1964 film by Hiroshi Teshigahara, and my new personal favorite Woman In The Dunes.  Brilliant. Intense. With music by Tôru Takemitsu…Film Forum recently had a retrospective of his work (music composed for film).
And Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s recent film Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives. So beautiful crafted in its simplicity and abstraction. Fascinating. Film Screening tomorrow and More clips soon.
This week I enrolled in the 5 day International Documentary Challenge with a group of school friends.
The idea was to make a short doc in 5 days, the theme and genre of which we find out on the first day of the challenge.  Easy enough!  The theme was Movement, the genre a character study.  We decided to document Matt Lewis a firm believer of Harold Camping’s theory that May 21st is Judgement Day.
Though I can’t post the video online just yet…it will be made available once the judging is over.  Most challenging of the challenge is orienting oneself to the group dynamic and adapting ideas to the the ideas of the team…not so easy but a great learning experience.
In the mean time, two fantastic movies I saw recently. A 1964 film by Hiroshi Teshigahara, and my new personal favorite Woman In The Dunes.  Brilliant. Intense. With music by Tôru Takemitsu…Film Forum recently had a retrospective of his work (music composed for film).
And Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s recent film Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives. So beautiful crafted in its simplicity and abstraction. Fascinating. Film Screening tomorrow and More clips soon.

This week I enrolled in the 5 day International Documentary Challenge with a group of school friends.

The idea was to make a short doc in 5 days, the theme and genre of which we find out on the first day of the challenge.  Easy enough!  The theme was Movement, the genre a character study.  We decided to document Matt Lewis a firm believer of Harold Camping’s theory that May 21st is Judgement Day.

Though I can’t post the video online just yet…it will be made available once the judging is over.  Most challenging of the challenge is orienting oneself to the group dynamic and adapting ideas to the the ideas of the team…not so easy but a great learning experience.

In the mean time, two fantastic movies I saw recently. A 1964 film by Hiroshi Teshigahara, and my new personal favorite Woman In The Dunes.  Brilliant. Intense. With music by Tôru Takemitsu…Film Forum recently had a retrospective of his work (music composed for film).

And Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s recent film Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives. So beautiful crafted in its simplicity and abstraction. Fascinating. Film Screening tomorrow and More clips soon.

This a project i’ve been working on since last summer. Spent my days hanging out with the Kite Flyers of Brooklyn after being introduced by my friend Giovanni.
This is a short documentary on the Pakistani tradition of Kite Battling,  as a sport, it’s quite meditative and beautiful.
WATCH ::: https://vimeo.com/16835171
First place it’s showing is at the Screen Loud Film Festival. More good news in May, Following Crickets screens in Austria at E.V.A. Experimental Video Art Festival.
This a project i’ve been working on since last summer. Spent my days hanging out with the Kite Flyers of Brooklyn after being introduced by my friend Giovanni.
This is a short documentary on the Pakistani tradition of Kite Battling,  as a sport, it’s quite meditative and beautiful.
WATCH ::: https://vimeo.com/16835171
First place it’s showing is at the Screen Loud Film Festival. More good news in May, Following Crickets screens in Austria at E.V.A. Experimental Video Art Festival.

This a project i’ve been working on since last summer. Spent my days hanging out with the Kite Flyers of Brooklyn after being introduced by my friend Giovanni.

This is a short documentary on the Pakistani tradition of Kite Battling,  as a sport, it’s quite meditative and beautiful.

WATCH ::: https://vimeo.com/16835171

First place it’s showing is at the Screen Loud Film Festival. More good news in May, Following Crickets screens in Austria at E.V.A. Experimental Video Art Festival.

I V A A S K S

Posted on Sunday December 19th 2010 at 04:50pm. Its tags are listed below.

Iva Rad
—  I-Identity

So after what felt like a marathon 4 months…I’m taking a little breather…on an island in the sun, Cyprus. (70 degrees! yes…)

I’ll be filming here and will be back with some new island flavor soon. In the meantime, maybe you’ll enjoy this audio project on Identity : I-Identity

Mostly, it incorporates recordings of my grandma reciting a recipe, momma (the accented english), dad, sister, close friends and myself in an attempt to explore:

What is it that gives us our identity? 

What forms our particular identifications with things?

How strong are our roots in the identification process?

And what happens when those roots are disrupted?

How does our family and environment shape our identity?

Is Identity necessary?

Who am I when I’m still - silent?

Enjoy.

On a Thursday night i ventured off to Hunts Point in the Bronx to write a story for Hunts Point Express on the Urban Word program at The Point…
I was awed and inspired, maybe you’ll be too ::: http://vimeo.com/17486259
check out 13 year old activist, poet, spoken word mc Nene Ali. 
It’s been a marathon month, or three months…with 4 projects due in one week time is limited but…i did discover a new favorite blog with lots of brilliant film discussion, doc ideas, inspiring projects etc, check it out collabdocs .
Oh and p.s. I did switch to a 5D, from 7D…more on that next week.
On a Thursday night i ventured off to Hunts Point in the Bronx to write a story for Hunts Point Express on the Urban Word program at The Point…
I was awed and inspired, maybe you’ll be too ::: http://vimeo.com/17486259
check out 13 year old activist, poet, spoken word mc Nene Ali. 
It’s been a marathon month, or three months…with 4 projects due in one week time is limited but…i did discover a new favorite blog with lots of brilliant film discussion, doc ideas, inspiring projects etc, check it out collabdocs .
Oh and p.s. I did switch to a 5D, from 7D…more on that next week.

On a Thursday night i ventured off to Hunts Point in the Bronx to write a story for Hunts Point Express on the Urban Word program at The Point

I was awed and inspired, maybe you’ll be too ::: http://vimeo.com/17486259

check out 13 year old activist, poet, spoken word mc Nene Ali

It’s been a marathon month, or three months…with 4 projects due in one week time is limited but…i did discover a new favorite blog with lots of brilliant film discussion, doc ideas, inspiring projects etc, check it out collabdocs .

Oh and p.s. I did switch to a 5D, from 7D…more on that next week.

On my way to and from Hunter (College), I sometimes stop to reinforce my peanut addiction…one of those days I ran into Nelson whose cash machine is decorated with photos from Vietnam…
of course, I had to ask…here’s Nelson’s story ::: http://vimeo.com/17072307
Also, i bought this new Zeiss lens which allows for this brilliant image…BUT…major vignetting when closing to anywhere near f3…big issue (you can see some blackness in the close ups)…and i thought i was getting a good deal…so, stay away from Zebra Pancolar 1.8/50 50mm Zeiss Jena DDR.
And lastly, check out this cool interactive film by Chris Milk
On my way to and from Hunter (College), I sometimes stop to reinforce my peanut addiction…one of those days I ran into Nelson whose cash machine is decorated with photos from Vietnam…
of course, I had to ask…here’s Nelson’s story ::: http://vimeo.com/17072307
Also, i bought this new Zeiss lens which allows for this brilliant image…BUT…major vignetting when closing to anywhere near f3…big issue (you can see some blackness in the close ups)…and i thought i was getting a good deal…so, stay away from Zebra Pancolar 1.8/50 50mm Zeiss Jena DDR.
And lastly, check out this cool interactive film by Chris Milk

On my way to and from Hunter (College), I sometimes stop to reinforce my peanut addiction…one of those days I ran into Nelson whose cash machine is decorated with photos from Vietnam…

of course, I had to ask…here’s Nelson’s story ::: http://vimeo.com/17072307

Also, i bought this new Zeiss lens which allows for this brilliant image…BUT…major vignetting when closing to anywhere near f3…big issue (you can see some blackness in the close ups)…and i thought i was getting a good deal…so, stay away from Zebra Pancolar 1.8/50 50mm Zeiss Jena DDR.

And lastly, check out this cool interactive film by Chris Milk